User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-Independent
Category: River Systems :: Green River
Last updated: Sep 01 2017 01:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Money-for-water programs work — but for how long? 30.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In the Colorado River Basin, a pilot project wins over skeptical farmers and ranchers.
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There’s success in money-for-water programs — but for how long? 30.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In the Colorado River Basin, a pilot project wins over skeptical farmers and ranchers.
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NASA's Smartest Satellite Is Gone. Can Private Space Replace It? 9.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Look down on Buenos Aires from the sky, and you can learn a fair bit about the city. It's got a lot of concrete. Also a lot of trees. There's a bright green river delta to the north, which probably explains the ruddy-brown bay to the east. But with the right camera—a hyperspectral one—you can pick up a whole lot more. New colors emerge, hidden hues your eyes and mine aren't wired to see. And these colors reflect even more detail about the scene: the gases coming out of the city, the health of the plants surrounding it, the species of algae coloring the water offshore.
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Drilling threatens Dinosaur National Monument — again 24.7.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Old public-lands battles are rekindled as Interior prioritizes oil and gas.
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Ranch owner builds in the path of pronghorn migration 10.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
It’s not clear if the new building could interfere with the animal’s long-distance travels.
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Stop "Massive Strip Mining" in Utah's Public Lands: Green Groups to BLM 17.6.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nika Knight, staff writer

In the latest chapter of a decades-long battle over oil-rich shale in Utah, this week over a dozen conservation groups submitted public comments urging the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to reject an Estonian oil giant's attempts to sidestep environmental review and start the first commercial oil shale project in the United States.

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Why Rep. Rob Bishop’s promises of wilderness ring false 28.4.2016 Writers on the Range
Famed forester Bob Marshall foreshadowed the loss of untouched lands in Utah.
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Obama's Interior Department Pushes Oil Shale Plan Threatening Massive Climate Pollution, Water Use 7.4.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The Bureau of Land Management announced this week that it is moving toward allowing dirty oil shale development that could be a double whammy for the environment, unleashing nearly a half a billion tons of greenhouse gases and consuming vast amounts Colorado River basin water. It would be the first commercial oil shale production facility in the United ...
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The failed compromises of Rep. Rob Bishop’s public lands master plan 22.2.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The much-anticipated plan has ramped up the tensions between land users that it promised to defuse.
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Wyoming seeks compromise on wildlife migration corridors 1.12.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Migration science has advanced, and the Game & Fish Commission is looking to reassess land use.
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Biking the line between wilderness and civilization 18.7.2015 High Country News Most Recent
A bikepacking trip in Canyonlands offers a new look at a well-travelled landscape.
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Why Some Republicans Don't Want Legal Protection For This Unique Bird 13.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON, July 13 (Reuters) - A wildlife protection fight over a quirky ground-dwelling bird highlights how two U.S. environmental groups have increasingly dominated the process of species protection, sparking a backlash from pro-business Republicans. A Reuters review of hundreds of federal records over a 10-year period shows how the non-profit groups have had success by inundating Washington with petitions for new protected-species listings and lawsuits designed to compel regulators to respond. Photo: vividcorvid/Flickr Many of the new listings achieved by the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) and WildEarth Guardians have been for relatively obscure species, such as snails and fish with compact habitats. But their effort to protect a wide-ranging bird called greater sage grouse has now sparked a backlash from critics who say the Endangered Species Act is being manipulated and abused by environmentalists through aggressive legal actions and closed-door settlements. The federal government must ...
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Dam bill for Green River revives industrialist dream 30.6.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Boosters want Fontenelle Dam to divert more water in southwest Wyoming.
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Explore one of the West's last wild rivers with Google Street View 28.1.2015 TreeHugger
The software lets you virtually float down the Yampa River, which has been largely unchanged by man.
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Federally Approved "Take" of Grizzly Bears Threatens Recovery 15.1.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Obama 'Priority Agenda' for Land, Climate Ignores Fossil Fuel Leasing 10.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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‘Lucking out’ for Wyoming’s winter smog 29.7.2014 From the Blogs
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Utah's majestic landscapes threatened by dirty fuels industry 20.6.2014 TreeHugger
Moab, Utah, is known for its amazing recreation opportunities. Unfortunately it's now becoming known for oil, gas, and coal as well.
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Meet Me in St. Louis: Taking On The World’s Largest Coal Company 17.5.2014 Commondreams.org Views
Scott Parkin

A protest outside of Peabody Coal in St. Louis. (Photo: tolkien1914/cc/flickr)“And daddy won’t you take me back to Muhlenberg County
Down by the Green River where Paradise lay
Well, I’m sorry my son, but you’re too late in asking
Mister Peabody’s coal train has hauled it away”

—John Prine, Paradise

read more

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The Colorado River Rejoins the Sea: A Water-level Account of the Historic Pulse Flow 16.5.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The bow of my kayak parts the soft tops of tamarisk trees as we glide down a straight bulldozed pilot channel in the Colorado River's delta. The water is cool and clear. Fish dart amid scrub brush that, just days earlier, had been surrounded by miles of bone-dry desert. The last time I was here I was hiking amid sandy truck tracks, old tires and scattered trash that filled the former riverbed. It also was my first day on foot after more than 100 days on the water. My friend Will Stauffer-Norris and I had arrived in early 2012, after paddling 1,700 miles from the source of the Green River in Wyoming only to lose the remnants of the river in the vast complex of concrete irrigation canals that begins at the U.S.-Mexico border. From the border fence to the sea, our trip consisted mostly of cracked mud flats, anxious camping in Mexican alfalfa fields, and walls of the invasive tamarisk so thick that the painstaking crawl through them would have made Tai Chi classes and DMV lines appear rushed in ...
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