On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-Independent
Category: River Systems :: San Juan River
Last updated: Nov 27 2017 18:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Contested water settlements inflamed the Navajo Nation’s health crisis 11.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Colonial laws and federal neglect created a worse-case scenario during a global pandemic.
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High Country News visits Bears Ears 27.11.2017 Current Issue
Editorial takes a trip, our holiday party gets closer and welcome new staffers!
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Coal. Guns. Freedom? 21.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
How the Trump administration has seized mythologies around coal.
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Why we should fight against Utah’s war on public lands 18.5.2017 Writers on the Range
And where to submit your comments to protect Bears Ears National Monument.
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The bid for Bears Ears 16.10.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The tribal push for a Bears Ears monument raises thorny questions of homeland and sovereignty.
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The bid for Bears Ears 16.10.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The tribal push for a Bears Ears monument raises thorny questions of homeland and sovereignty.
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Latest: Officials open a criminal investigation of EPA’s role in the Animas river spill 20.8.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Agency contractors were excavating debris at the old mining site when the river flooded with wastewater.
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New measures could reduce Glen Canyon Dam’s impact on the Grand Canyon — a bit 25.7.2016 Current Issue
As long as the dam remains in place, impacts are inevitable.
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In Utah, the fight for a Bears Ears monument heats up 3.5.2016 High Country News Most Recent
In a place where history, culture and geography intermingle, ‘local’ can be hard to define.
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Silverton’s Gold King reckoning 2.5.2016 High Country News Most Recent
How the Animas River disaster forced Silverton to face its pollution problem — and its destiny.
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Flint Is Not The Only Water Crisis America Ignored 24.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The water crisis in Flint is a tragedy. As it has unfolded, we have learned the massive cost that these families have been asked to pay, with their health and their lives and their security. And the reason for this crime against humanity? The pursuit of the almighty dollar by a few people in power. As that reality sets in, so does the shock. The knowledge that our own government, members of our society, could willingly and knowingly poison a population for profit is almost too much to bear. But, the idea was no stranger to Earley or Ambrose or Snyder. The ability of those in power to subjugate their fellow man for personal gain has been a doctrine of this country since it began. From the time of Christopher Columbus's "discovery" until now, this has been business as usual for the Americas. The enslavement of Native peoples in the mid-1500s , the slave trade of African Americans, the Seminole War, the Trail of Tears, the forced sterilization of African American and Native American women, the Indian ...
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How A Firm Helps Small Communities Remove Contamination From Their Water 29.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
John Pujol and his team at SimpleWater, a Berkeley-based engineering firm, have developed a new way to put contaminated wells back into service by making friends with the age-old process of rusting metal. It could be cheaper and easier for many communities dealing with arsenic problems. The way some people look at it, California has plenty of water to survive its periodic droughts. The problem is much of that water isn’t drinkable, and can’t be made drinkable, because it is too contaminated. This is how John Pujol sees the situation. As CEO of SimpleWater , he has helped develop a new method to remove arsenic from groundwater. Arsenic is a naturally occurring element, but beyond a certain concentration it can cause a variety of health problems, including cancer, and can even be fatal when it arises in excessive quantities. More than 2,200 California drinking water sources are tainted by arsenic, and 600 of these exceed the state’s regulatory standard for arsenic contamination. Rigid federal water quality ...
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26 States Fight To Block Obama's Carbon Emissions Plan To Curb Global Warming 27.1.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A group of U.S. states led by coal producer West Virginia and oil producer Texas on Tuesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to put a hold on President Barack Obama's plan to curb carbon dioxide emissions from power plants to combat climate change. The 26 states filed a stay application with U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts after an appeals court in Washington declined last week to block Obama's Clean Power Plan while litigation over its lawfulness goes ahead. "If this court does not enter a stay, the plan will continue to unlawfully impose massive and irreparable harms upon the sovereign states, as well as irreversible changes in the energy markets," lawyers for the states said in the latest filing. There is no immediate deadline by which Roberts must act on the request. He is likely to ask the Obama administration to file a response. He can then act on the application by himself or circulate it among the eight other Supreme Court justices. The states and several major business groups in October launched ...
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Animas River spill: only the latest in 150 years of pollution 17.8.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Mapping the other threats to the Animas and San Juan Rivers.
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Cleaning Up Toxic Yellow Sludge Is Just The Beginning Of EPA's Mine Problems 14.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
SILVERTON, Colorado (AP) -- It will take many years and many millions of dollars simply to manage and not even remove the toxic wastewater from an abandoned mine that unleashed a 100-mile-long torrent of heavy metals into Western rivers, experts said Thursday. Plugging Colorado's Gold King Mine could simply lead to an eventual explosion of poisonous water elsewhere, so the safest solution, they say, would be to install a treatment plant that would indefinitely clean the water from Gold King and three other nearby mines. It would cost millions of dollars, and do nothing to contain the thousands of other toxic streams that are a permanent legacy of mining across the nation. Federal authorities first suggested a treatment plant for Gold King more than a decade ago, but local officials and owners of a nearby mine were reluctant to embrace a federally-sponsored cleanup. "They have been not pursuing the obvious solution," said Rob Robinson, a retired abandoned mines cleanup coordinator for the U.S. Bureau of ...
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Federal Experts: Current El Nino Could Be Historically Strong 13.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This June 19, 2015 aerial photo shows a white heron taking flight over revealed fish nests, normally inches below the waterline in La Plata reservoir in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico. Thanks to El Nino, a warming of the tropical Pacific Ocean that affects global weather, less rain fell to help refill Puerto Rico’s La Plata reservoir, as well as La Plata river in the central island community of Naranjito. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo) WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal meteorologists say the current El Nino is already the second strongest on record for this time of year and could be one of the most potent weather changers of the past 65 years. The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration recorded unusual warmth in the Pacific Ocean in the last three months. El Nino (ehl NEEN'-yoh) is a heating of the equatorial Pacific that changes weather worldwide, mostly affecting the United States in winter. NOAA's Mike Halpert said Thursday the current El Nino likely will rival past super El Ninos in 1997-1998, 1982-83 and ...
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Navajo Nation 'Lifeline' Under Threat from Toxic Mine Spill 12.8.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Toxic Fallout Continues as Colorado Mine Spill Declared Three Times Larger Than Stated 10.8.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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EPA Accidentally Spills Millions Of Gallons Of Waste, Turning River Orange 7.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
  DENVER (AP) — A million-gallon mine waste spill that sent a plume of orange-ish muck down a river in southwest Colorado on Thursday was caused by a federal mine cleanup crew. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said that a cleanup team was working with heavy equipment Wednesday to secure an entrance to the Gold King Mine. Workers instead released an estimated 1 million gallons of mine waste into Cement Creek. "The project was intended to pump and treat the water and reduce metals pollution flowing out of the mine," agency spokesman Rich Mylott said in a statement. The creek runs into the Animas River, which then flows into the San Juan River in New Mexico and joins the Colorado River in Utah. Officials emphasized that there was no threat to drinking water from the spill. But downstream water agencies were warned to avoid Animas water until the plume passes, said David Ostrander, director of EPA's emergency response program in Denver. Officials weren't sure how long it would take the plume to ...
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Leaping Sturgeon Kills Girl In Boat On Florida River 5.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
LAKE CITY, Fla. (AP) — A 5-year-old Florida girl riding in a boat has died after a sturgeon leaped from the Suwannee River and struck her. Wildlife officials said Jaylon Rippy died after being struck Thursday night. Her mother and 9-year-old brother were also injured and taken to a Gainesville hospital. Their condition was not known. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said this is the first fatality recorded from a sturgeon strike on the Suwannee River. Four people have been injured by jumping sturgeon this year. The fish are known for leaping more than 7 feet above the water. They can grow up to 8 feet long and weigh up to 200 pounds and can cause serious injuries. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
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