User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-Independent
Category: River Systems :: Rio Grande River
Last updated: Sep 20 2019 23:33 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The prospect of more Airbnbs tempts a struggling New Mexico town 20.9.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Vacation rentals have gutted the culture of nearby communities, but a new project in Questa flips the narrative.
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Colorado farmers fight to save their water and their community’s future 16.9.2019 Current Issue
‘We can either wait on Mother Nature — or we can give it a shot ourselves.’
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Who pays for infrastructure in Borderland colonias? 5.8.2019 Current Issue
In places like Vado, New Mexico, good roads are hard to find.
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A memoir of sorrow and grace 4.6.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Pam Houston conveys the pleasures and challenges of rural life.
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Bighorns deserve better 24.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
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Trump's family separation policy inflicts pain and fuels hate 5.7.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics Summer days are long and hot in the Rio Grande Valley, the verdant flood plain that stretches 100 miles along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas, from McAllen to Brownsville. This is the epicentre of President Donald Trump's self-created immigrant family separation crisis, with at least 2,047 children torn from their parents' arms and imprisoned. The main child detention centre in Brownsville is in an old Walmart, its vast interior space filled now not with products manufactured by low-wage workers in distant foreign factories, but with 1,400 children penned inside of chain-link cages with Mylar sheets for comfort. Southwest Key, the nonprofit agency that runs this detention center, actually calls it Casa Padre, "Father's House," a painful reminder to so many children separated from their fathers. Detention of immigrant families has been happening for years and even accelerated under President Barack Obama. But, on May 7, the cruel triumvirate of Trump, his famously anti-immigrant adviser ...
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Trump Will Deploy Military to the Border Amid Immigration Crackdown 4.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
On Tuesday, President Trump said that he would deploy the military to the border with Mexico -- following several hardline tweets on immigration meant to appease his nativist base. The White House is pushing a number of policies that could harm vulnerable women and children arriving at the border. Meanwhile, activists say they have been targeted by immigration police for speaking out against the crackdown. Immigrants wait to be transported to a central processing center shortly after they crossed the border from Mexico into the United States on Monday, March 26, 2018, in the Rio Grande Valley Sector near McAllen, Texas. (Photo: Loren Elliott / AFP / Getty Images) President Trump said on Tuesday that he would deploy the military to the southern border with Mexico until the government agrees to build his proposed border wall for keeping out undocumented immigrants. "We are going to be guarding our border with our military. That's a big step," Trump said. The comments come as the Trump administration rolls ...
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Communities in US and Mexico at Risk From Sewage, Pollution and Disease 4.3.2018 Truthout.com
Thanks to reader support, Truthout can deliver the news seven days a week, 365 days a year. Keep independent journalism going strong: Make a tax-deductible donation right now. Imperial Beach, California -- U.S. Border Patrol Agent Christopher Harris steers his truck along the hilly road next to the border fence separating this beach community in the extreme southwest corner of the U.S. from Tijuana, Baja California's largest city. On a late November afternoon, Harris tours three different canyons along the border. At the bottom of each canyon, a ribbon of dark wastewater originates in Tijuana and flows into the wetlands of the Tijuana Slough National Wildlife Refuge on its way to the Pacific Ocean. Drainage to Pacific Tijuana Slough. (Photo: John Dougherty) No one in the United States is certain whether the effluent is coming from Tijuana's failing wastewater-treatment system or if it is illegally dumped in the canyon creek beds in Tijuana. On this day, it flowed through dry creek beds, where Harris says ...
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A Southwest water dispute reaches the Supreme Court 23.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Why a fight over groundwater has left farmers in New Mexico feeling stranded.
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Five Ideas for Creating a Sustainable Future 2.1.2018 Truthout.com
Join the movement for independent media -- no ads, no corporate pressure, just the facts. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout today! Much news about the environment in 2017 focused on controversies over Trump administration actions, such as proposals to promote more use of coal and budget cuts at relevant federal agencies. At the same time, however, many scholars across the United States are pursuing innovations that could help create a more sustainable world. Here we spotlight five examples from our 2017 archives. 1. Restoring the Rio Grande Although many Americans may not realize it, the United States and Mexico work together on many environmental issues along their joint border, including drinking water, sanitation and flood control. Gabriel Diaz Montemayor, assistant professor of landscape architecture at the University of Texas at Austin,  proposes a bolder vision : greening the entire Rio Grande Valley, which forms more than half of the border. Restoring vegetation along the ...
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Ancestral Pueblo logging practices could save New Mexico pinelands 6.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Researchers look to the past to better fight fire.
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A hard look at history’s bitter truths and selective memory 11.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Statues should offer more comprehensive interpretations of past events.
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Indigenous knowledge untangles the mystery of Mesa Verde 2.10.2017 Current Issue
Pueblo people are helping archaeologists understand the science of human migrations.
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Climate Change Refugees Face Militarized Borders 1.10.2017 Truthout.com
Rising seas and raging hurricanes could destroy your town. Drought and mudslides could destroy your livelihood. But none of that matters to those empowered to control a nation-state's territorial boundaries, says author Todd Miller whose book, Storming the Wall, looks at corporate border militarization against climate refugees and the emerging movements for environmental justice. A US Border Patrol agent scans the US-Mexico border while on a bridge over the Rio Grande on March 13, 2017, in Roma, Texas. "In the eyes of the nation-state, a person migrating because of climate reasons is meaningless," says author and journalist Todd Miller. (Photo: John Moore / Getty Images) As more and more climate-ravaged communities are forced to relocate by droughts, floods and superstorms, the business of fortifying borders is booming. In his new book, Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security, Todd Miller travels around the world reporting on the corporate border militarization cash grab, and ...
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While Obama Humanizes Undocumented Immigrants And Calls Them Americans, Trump Calls Them 'Vomit' 12.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
When it comes to talking about undocumented immigrants, our two most recent presidents could not be more different.
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The days of $10 senior National Park passes are ending 11.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
And seniors are rushing to get one before they’re gone.
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Supreme Court Tosses Case On Cross-Border Shootings Back To Lower Court 26.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The Supreme Court on Monday declined to decide on whether non-citizens have constitutional rights at the border, and ordered the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit to reconsider the question of whether the families of Mexican nationals killed by U.S. border authorities can sue in federal court. The lower court will again decide whether the family of Sergio Hernandez, a 15-year-old Mexican national fatally shot by a U.S. border patrol agent near the U.S.-Mexico border in 2010, has the right to sue the agent. Previously, the 5th Circuit found that Hernandez didn’t have constitutional protections. On Monday, the Supreme Court vacated that ruling and ordered the lower court to reconsider the case.  “The facts alleged in the complaint depict a disturbing incident resulting in a heartbreaking loss of life. Whether petitioners may recover damages for that loss in this suit depends on questions that are best answered by the Court of Appeals in the first instance,” reads the ruling.  Three justices ...
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No, Trump Will Not Be Building The Border Wall On Mexico's Side Of The Border 30.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The Trump administration is not planning on claiming land on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border for purposes of building a border wall, an administration official confirmed to The Huffington Post. The possibility of such a seizure was raised in vague remarks by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke this week, when he spoke about the difficulty of building a partition between the two countries along the Rio Grande. “The border is complicated, as far as building a physical wall,” Zinke reportedly said. “The Rio Grande, what side of the river are you going to put the wall? We’re not going to put it on our side and cede the river to Mexico. And we’re probably not going to put it in the middle of the river.” Democrats argued that Zinke’s remark implied that the administration was actively contemplating building a wall in Mexico, which would be both legally dubious and diplomatically problematic. But Zinke’s spokeswoman Heather Swift said this was a misreading.  “Secretary Zinke was talking about a combo of ...
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Supreme Court Torn Over Whether Constitution Should Apply To Cross-Border Shootings 22.2.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON ― As the administration of President Donald Trump readies a new crackdown on undocumented immigrants , the Supreme Court on Tuesday weighed a difficult case that could open federal courts to Mexican nationals whose family members are killed at the border by U.S. authorities. The  sobering case of Sergio Hernandez  ― a 15-year-old standing on Mexican soil when he was shot in the head by a U.S. Border Patrol agent from the American side ― found the justices wrestling with whether a non-citizen has any constitutional rights at the border. The answer will determine whether a federal law enforcement officer who violates a person’s fundamental right to not be killed can be sued. “You have a very sympathetic case,” Justice Stephen Breyer told Bob Hilliard, the lawyer representing Hernandez’s parents, who didn’t attend the hearing. The family hopes the American justice system can help them  press their civil rights claims against U.S. Border Patrol Agent Jesús Mesa, who killed their son in ...
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The Border Is A Constitution-Free Zone For Agents Who Shoot And Kill. But Maybe Not For Long. 20.2.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
CIUDAD JUÁREZ, Mexico — María Guadalupe Güereca wanted to hold her son. Instead, Mexican police held her back from the crime scene. So she watched him from above the canal that carries the Rio Grande between the American city of El Paso, Texas, and the Mexican city of Ciudad Juárez. Her 15-year-old son, Sergio Hernández, had been playing with a group of boys along the river, when U.S. Border Patrol agent Jesús Mesa Jr. went to apprehend them, apparently viewing them either as drug smugglers or people trying to cross the border illegally. He grabbed one of the boys on the U.S. side of the river canal, as the rest fled. Sensing that someone was throwing rocks, he turned toward Sergio, who had taken cover behind the bridge piling on the Mexican side of the river, and shot him in the face. The medics who arrived on the scene soon ceded their job to the coroners. But Güereca swears she saw her son move. “My boy was alive when I got there,” Güereca said. “But they wouldn’t let me down to see him.” With the ...
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