User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-National
Category: Policy
Last updated: May 23 2018 14:20 IST RSS 2.0
 
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TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
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Damming evidence: Communities turn to reusing wastewater as scarcity threatens 23.5.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
The move marks a paradigm shift in water storage and conservation methods.
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Scott Pruitt, praised for effectiveness, hits procedural, legal snags in his rush to roll back EPA rules 21.5.2018 Washington Post
The delays threaten to tarnish the EPA administrator’s image as an potent warrior in President Trump’s battle against federal regulations, a reputation that has so far saved his job amid an array of investigations into ethical and management lapses.
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After contentious primary, Pa. Republicans prepare to nominate challenger to Gov. Tom Wolf 12.5.2018 Philly.com News
The stakes are high: the GOP controls the legislature, and a Republican governor would likely try to move the commonwealth in a conservative direction on everything from tax policy to public education to Medicaid eligibility and abortion rights. Democrats see Gov. Wolf's reelection as a key check on those efforts, even as the legislature has thwarted much of his agenda.
The Energy 202: Mothers lobbied Scott Pruitt to ban a toxic chemical. Two days later, EPA signaled it would. 11.5.2018 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Mothers lobbied Scott Pruitt to ban a toxic chemical. Two days later, EPA signaled it would.
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What will happen to solar panels after their useful lives are over? 11.5.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
It's a good sign that solar energy use is growing, but the infrastructure to sunset these cells barely exists.
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Pro tip to President Trump and Kim Jong Un: Don't litter in Singapore 11.5.2018 LA Times: Commentary
A memo justifying my first-class travel 10.5.2018 Washington Post: Op-Eds
A memo justifying my first-class travel
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The state of Tennessee's circular economy 9.5.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
The Volunteer State is missing economic and policy opportunities to recover and reuse materials for the domestic commodity market.
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Third Pruitt Aide This Week Is Leaving EPA 4.5.2018 Wall St. Journal: Policy
The agency’s top spokeswoman is leaving the agency to work for a Republican senator.
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Europe Just Banned the Chemicals That Lay Waste to Honeybees. But They’re Still Everywhere in the US. 3.5.2018 Mother Jones
In late April, the European Union banned a blockbuster trio of neonicotinoid insecticides, marketed by chemical giants Syngenta and Bayer. The decision, motivated by mounting evidence of harm to bees exposed to the chemicals, entrenches a temporary moratorium the EU placed on them back in 2013.  Here in the United States, use of neonicotinoids continues unabated. […]
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Straw-on-request laws seem silly, but they sure change the conversation about plastic trash 1.5.2018 LA Times: Commentary
Measure to block take-out container laws advances but is unlikely to become law 25.4.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
A bill that would overturn local ordinances that ban non-recyclable containers cleared a committee, but may not make it to a floor vote.
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Canary in the Coal Pond 23.4.2018 Truthout.com
New reports provide an unprecedented look at contaminants leaking from coal ash ponds and landfills. But the chasm between information and environmental protection may deepen thanks to a proposed Trump administration rollback that would lessen the consequences and weaken requirements for polluting power plants. Coal ash slurry pours into the first of two settling ponds adjacent to the Riverbend Steam Station on Mountain Island Lake in Gaston County, North Carolina, January 23, 2008. (Photo: Jeff Willhelm / Charlotte Observer / MCT via Getty Images) In tests conducted in late 2017, one in three coal-fired power plants nationwide detected "statistically significant" amounts of contaminants, including harmful chemicals like arsenic, in the groundwater around their facilities. This information, which utility companies had to post on their websites in March, became public for the first time under an Obama-era environmental rule regulating coal ash, the waste generated from burning coal. Mixed with water and ...
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The Trump Administration Wants to Make Groundwater Less Safe in Coal Country 21.4.2018 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared on ProPublica. In tests conducted in late 2017, one in three coal-fired power plants nationwide detected “statistically significant” amounts of contaminants, including harmful chemicals like arsenic, in the groundwater around their facilities. This information, which utility companies had to post on their websites in March, became public for the first time under […]
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4 ways to cut your carbon footprint that are way more powerful than recycling 19.4.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Researchers have identified the four highest-impact actions individuals can take to help the climate. You may not like them.
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The Daily 202: Trump’s plan to pardon ‘Scooter’ Libby sends a message to witnesses in Mueller probe 13.4.2018 Washington Post: Politics
There’s a Comey connection.
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Maharashtra extends deadline to dispose banned plastic items to three months 12.4.2018 Mumbai – The Indian Express
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Without warning system, schools often 'pass the trash' -- and expose kids to danger 6.4.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Federal education laws are supposed to protect students from the cycle of educator-based misconduct -- abuse, dismissal, rehire and abuse again. But no one is tracking compliance.
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As waves of homeless descend onto trains, L.A. tries a new strategy: social workers on the subway 6.4.2018 LA Times: Commentary
Metro has hired outreach workers who try to house the homeless who sleep on the subway. The agency says its hope is that spending $1.2 million on helping homeless people, instead of ticketing them, may make a difference in the long run.
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