User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-National
Category: Reduce
Last updated: Oct 28 2020 15:26 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Kraft Heinz sustainability chief reflects on 'interdependence' 28.10.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Kraft Heinz sustainability chief reflects on 'interdependence' Heather Clancy Wed, 10/28/2020 - 01:00 Food company Kraft Heinz has been relatively quiet about its corporate sustainability strategy in the five years since it was formed through the merger of food giants Kraft and Heinz — stepping out in early 2018 to provide an update . In September, the maker of well-known brands such as Kraft Macaroni & Cheese, Planter’s Nuts and Heinz Ketchup — which had $25 billion in revenue last year — spoke up again with a second combined report that shows it stalled on 2020 goals for energy and water through last year (it will miss both) and doubles down on work to create circular production processes for packaging (it’s ahead of schedule and will introduce the first circular Heinz bottle in Europe next year). Kraft Heinz also updated its commitments with new targets pegged to 2025. Here are some of the latest commitments, along with perspective on progress so far: Procure most electricity from renewable sources by ...
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Gillette plans to shave use of virgin plastics by 50% by 2030 27.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Gillette plans to shave use of virgin plastics by 50% by 2030 Deonna Anderson Tue, 10/27/2020 - 02:17 Personal care products brand Gillette, known for its razors, set out to become a more sustainable company one decade again. And over the past 10 years, it has reduced its energy consumption by 392,851 gigajoules and its greenhouse gas emissions by 26 percent. The company has also reached zero-manufacturing-waste-to-landfill status across all of the plants in its global network. On Monday, Gillette announced its 2030 goals to uplevel its sustainability ambitions. Building on the 26 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions — and using a 2009-2010 baseline — Gillette plans to boost that number to a 50 percent reduction by 2030. “We've done a lot over the 10 years. But we're not complacent,” said Gary Coombe, CEO at Gillette. “And we recognize there's still a lot to do.” One of Gillette's 2030 goals is to maintain zero-waste-to-landfill status. To achieve that designation at its World Shaving ...
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These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health 26.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health Oliver Camp Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:30 On the recent World Food Day, the clarion call was clearer than ever: We must fix our food systems to improve human health, drive economic growth and save the planet from environmental collapse. The challenges facing us are wide-ranging. The way the world produces and consumes food causes huge environmental impacts, and yet 3 billion people worldwide are unable to afford a healthy diet, and up to a third of the food we produce is wasted. What’s more, hunger and micronutrient deficiencies are concentrated among the poorest and most vulnerable — often including those who produce the food we eat. Meanwhile, the so-called double burden of malnutrition is on the rise: hunger and malnourishment coexisting with overweight and obesity, often in the same countries, communities or even individuals. Tackling these multiple challenges and threats requires coordinated action from the public sector, private ...
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Voters offered a clear contrast in race between U.S. Rep. Lauren Underwood and state Sen. Jim Oberweis 21.10.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Voters offered a clear contrast in race between U.S. Rep. Lauren Underwood and state Sen. Jim Oberweis.
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Young Activists Aren't Waiting for Anyone 20.10.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

Climate change has joined racism, sexism, and related aggressions in creating a new dynamic demanding redress of America’s inequalities and defining its divisions. On the Republican right, President Donald Trump’s constituencies pursue restoration of an idealized American “greatness” lionizing the superiority of nativist White, aged, wealthy, Christian, publicly avowed heterosexual men to exploit the environment at will.  

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Six mistakes companies make when building a sustainability plan 7.10.2020 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Six mistakes companies make when building a sustainability plan
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Here’s How Big Farms Got a Big Government Pass on Air Pollution 16.9.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published by the Center for Public Integrity.  On nice days, Elsie Herring can sink back into her porch rocking chair, enjoying the rural property that’s been in her family since 1891. Other days, the wind carries a foul-smelling mist that chokes Herring and coats the pink siding of her home. It’s […]
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How Avangard Innovative is working to scale post-consumer resin recycling 12.9.2020 GreenBiz.com
How Avangard Innovative is working to scale post-consumer resin recycling Since Avangard Innovative came onto the recycling scene 30 years ago, the company has expanded its presence to 11 countries. Its goal is to lower waste costs and what’s going into a landfill, said Rick Perez, chairman and CEO of the company.  Perez noted that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the work Avangard Innovative does. “At the end of the day, you have to pivot your business. You have to find a way to make it more valuable,” said Perez, adding that the demand for post-consumer resin is still present. Avangard Innovative has piloted and is now scaling its recycling work by building post-consumer resin facilities in Houston, New Mexico and Nevada. Heather Clancy, editorial director at GreenBiz, interviewed Rick Perez, chairman and CEO at Avangard Innovative, during Circularity 20, which took place on August 25-27, 2020. View archived videos from the conference here . Deonna Anderson Fri, 09/11/2020 - ...
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Carbon 'rainbow': Unilever pledges $1.2B to scrub fossil fuels from cleaning products 8.9.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Carbon 'rainbow': Unilever pledges $1.2B to scrub fossil fuels from cleaning products Cecilia Keating Tue, 09/08/2020 - 00:15 Unilever last week revealed plans to funnel close to $1.2 billion over the next 10 years into initiatives that will allow it to replace chemicals in its cleaning products made from fossil fuel feedstocks with greener alternatives — an investment it described as critical to meeting its aim of achieving net-zero emissions from its products by 2039. The new program, Clean Future, is largely focused on identifying and commercializing alternative sources of carbon for surfactants, the petrochemical molecules found in cleaning products that help remove grease from fabrics and surfaces. More than 46 percent of Unilever's cleaning and laundry products' carbon footprint is incurred by chemicals made from fossil fuel-produced carbon, most of which are used in surfactants.  However, the firm now intends to explore, invest and ramp up carbon capture and use technologies that will eliminate ...
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You can feel less guilty about flying to Aspen now, thanks to a carbon-offset program 4.9.2020 Denver Post: Local
Skip the traffic on I-70 and a take a carbon-offset flight to Aspen.
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Why Do Oil Companies Care So Much About Your Carbon Footprint 31.8.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Grist and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. If only there were an app that would let you track your personal carbon footprint in real-time, like a FitBit. You could watch the weight of your emissions grow as you drove to the store, took a bus to […]
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Where there's hope for speeding up business action on plastics 26.8.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Where there's hope for speeding up business action on plastics Elsa Wenzel Wed, 08/26/2020 - 02:01 In 10 short years, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation (EMF) arguably has done more than any other group to define and advance the circular economy. Its landmark report,  "The New Plastics Economy" (PDF),   sounded the alarm in 2016 that if "business as usual" continues, by 2025 the ocean may hold more plastic than fish by weight. Its commitment by the same name has attracted many of the planet's biggest brand names, among 450-plus signatories, to dramatically slash their use or production of plastic by 2025. PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, Unilever and even Tupperware  have signed on with governments and NGOs to do away with "unnecessary" plastics and innovate so that other plastics will be reused, recycled or composted; and kept out of natural systems. Only five years ago, few corporate leaders had plastic pollution on their official radar. Yet Dame Ellen MacArthur herself is floored by the rapid pace of change in ...
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6 Ways the US Can Curb Climate Change and Grow More Food 21.8.2020 WRI Stories
6 Ways the US Can Curb Climate Change and Grow More Food Comments|Add Comment|PrintHarvesting corn. Photo by United Soybean Board/Flickr American agriculture is among the most productive in the world. It employs 2.6 million people in growing food and other products worth nearly $400 billion annually. Over 20% of that output is shipped abroad, making the United States the largest exporter of agricultural products globally. U.S. agriculture has also grown more efficient in recent years,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Litter, graffiti and vandalism are increasing at state parks, national forests across Colorado 7.8.2020 Denver Post: Local
As more people head outdoors, trash piles have begun to grow.
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Denver’s war on plastics: Another casualty of COVID-19 29.7.2020 Denver Post: Local
As people continue to work and play at home, Denver residents create more trash and that's pushing the city's solid waste division to keep up.
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Closed Loop Partners teams with Walmart, CVS, Target to take on the plastic bag 24.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Closed Loop Partners teams with Walmart, CVS, Target to take on the plastic bag Deonna Anderson Fri, 07/24/2020 - 01:15 Single-use plastic shopping bags are a real problem. They take decades to break down but nearly 100 billion of them are used in the United States every year to cart away goods from retailers. Fewer than 10 percent of those are recycled  — often winding up in landfills and waterways because many recyclers don’t accept them . Now, Closed Loop Partners’ Center for the Circular Economy is partnering with Walmart, CVS Health and Target to address that problem. Their $15 million joint Beyond the Bag Initiative  — similar to a previous collaboration focused on redesigning cups — will focus on creating solutions that reinvent shopping bags and that more effectively divert single-use plastic bags from landfills.  "By coming together to tackle the problem, we aim to accelerate the pace of innovation and the commercialization of sustainable solutions," said Kathleen McLaughlin, executive vice ...
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Trader Joe's to eliminate product names criticized as racist 20.7.2020 LA Times: Business

Trader Joe's says it's retiring in-house labels such as Trader Jose's and Trader Ming's. A petition faulted company for "racist branding and packaging."

This popular waterfall hike joins the list of Colorado trails being loved to death 2.7.2020 Denver Post: News: Local
One day in May, more than 900 cars parked along the road near the trailhead, which only has to small parking lots.
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How Pandora hopes to reach 100% recycled silver and gold 30.6.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
How Pandora hopes to reach 100% recycled silver and gold Deonna Anderson Mon, 06/29/2020 - 16:55 By 2030, Pandora, the world’s largest jewelry brand by volume, will use 100 percent recycled silver and gold in its products. At least that’s the goal the Danish company set at the beginning of June. As it stands, 71 percent of the silver and gold in Pandora jewelry comes from recycled sources. And the company sells a lot of jewelry: Fast Company noted that last year, it sold 96 million pieces of jewelry, or roughly 750,000 pounds of silver, which is more than any other company in the industry. Pandora said it uses palladium, copper and man-made stones, such as nano-crystals and cubic zirconia, in its products but the volume of those materials is small compared to its use of silver, which accounts for over half of all purchased product materials measured by weight. The jewelry company also uses gold at a smaller volume. Pandora’s 100 percent recycled silver and gold commitment comes after the disclosure in ...
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Policy News: June 29, 2020 29.6.2020 EcoTone
In This Issue: President Trump Suspends Entry Under H1-B Visas Through the End of 2020 Senators Introduce Bill Restricting Visas to Researchers with Ties to “Hostile Foreign Actors.” House Democrats Infrastructure Bill Reauthorizes Watershed Restoration Programs, Creates Wildlife Corridor System Full House will vote on bill this week. Congress Senate confirms Sethuraman “Panch” Panchanathan to ...
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