User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: May 06 2016 20:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Contamination at Largest US Air Force Base in Asia: Kadena, Okinawa 6.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Documents obtained under the US Freedom of Information Act reveal how years of accidents and neglect at the Kadena Air Base in Okinawa have been polluting local land and water with hazardous chemicals including arsenic, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, asbestos and dioxin. Located in the center of Okinawa Island, Kadena Air Base is the largest United States Air Force installation in Asia. Equipped with two 3.7 kilometer runways and thousands of hangars, homes and workshops, the base and its adjoining arsenal at Chibana sprawl across 46 square kilometers of Okinawa's main island. Approximately 20,000 American service members, contractors and their families live or work here alongside 3,000 Japanese employees. More than 16,000 Okinawans own the land upon which the installation sits. Kadena Air Base hosts the biggest combat wing in the USAF -- the 18th Wing -- and, during the past seven decades, the installation has served as an important launch pad for wars in Korea, Vietnam and Iraq. Given the long ...
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Why All New Yorkers Should Support the Bag Bill 5.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This post is co-authored with Diana Blackwell is a resident of Fred Samuel Houses, a member of the Citizens Committee for New York City, and WeAct for Environmental Justice. As you read this, chances are you've already used one today. Lightweight, durable, and convenient, plastic bags have become a staple of commerce -- so ubiquitous that most cashiers and shopkeepers usually don't even ask if you really need one. But with New Yorkers using over 9 billion plastic bags a year, contributing over 90,000 tons of solid waste to our landfills, and costing taxpayers $12.5 million to haul to landfills, our carefree attitude about bags is causing our city a big problem. Fortunately it's one we can do something about. A bill being discussed in the City Council will drastically cut plastic bag waste by encouraging the use of reusable bags through a charge of five cents per bag at checkout. There are those that claim the bill will have an adverse impact on low-income New Yorkers. But no New Yorker will be forced to ...
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NYC Businesses Agree To Cut Waste In Half By June 3.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW YORK, May 2 (Reuters) - More than 30 New York City businesses, including Whole Foods Market Inc, Walt Disney Co's ABC and Anheuser Busch, have agreed to cut the trash they send to landfills by half by June, the mayor's office said on Monday. The "Zero Waste Challenge" is part of Mayor Bill de Blasio's ambitious goal to reduce the city's waste output by 90 percent by 2030, through increased recycling, reduced packaging and composting. In 2015, the city's sanitation department collected 3.2 million tons of waste. "We're doing what we can to make recycling and composting as accessible as possible to New Yorkers, but everyone will need to do their part to make a more sustainable New York City a reality," de Blasio said in a statement. "These businesses are leading the way." New York, with more than 8 million residents, is the largest city in the Western Hemisphere to adopt such a far-reaching plan. Los Angeles has announced a similar plan to reduce its waste by 90 percent by 2025. Participants in the ...
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TVs ending up in the dumps because they are too expensive to recycle 30.4.2016 TreeHugger
There are so many of them, and the glass is full of lead.
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Your daily coffee habit could contribute to a carbon neutral fuel 28.4.2016 TreeHugger
50,000 tonnes of coffee grounds will be turned into clean-burning and carbon neutral biomass pellets in the UK this year by the startup Bio-Bean.
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5 ways to reduce one pound (and more) of waste a week 22.4.2016 TreeHugger
How would you reduce one pound of waste per week from your lifestyle?
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Coffee Go-Ground 21.4.2016 Planet Ark News
Do you start your day unable to mutter much aside from the word 'coffee'? Australians drink 6 billion cups of coffee a year, so to coincide with a new report about how to deal with coffee ground waste we've put together some times on ways to make your daily hit (or hits) more sustainable.
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Trash talking: Cities finding smarter ways to collect our waste 20.4.2016 TreeHugger
How urban waste management is wising up.
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Wielding the Law to Safeguard the Land 20.4.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Legal work isn't usually glamorous. In movies, lawsuits are portrayed as epic, exciting battles -- in practice, legal work can be a slow and arduous process. Thankfully, as two of the 2016  Goldman Environmental Prize  recipients well know, it can also bring unparalleled results.  Zuzana Caputova has seen such results first hand. For years, she has been fighting an unpermitted landfill just outside of her small town of Pezinok, Slovakia. Built in the 1960s, the landfill sits a mere 500 feet from a residential area. Caputova could smell the landfill from her home, and worried about her children's health. Rates of cancer, respiratory illnesses, and allergies were increasing in her community of just over 20,000 people, and one type of leukemia was being reported at eight times the national average. Then, in 2003, construction began on a second landfill within city limits, despite a 2002 ordinance banning waste dumps within the city. This time, Caputova, a lawyer by training, decided she had to do something ...
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The unfortunate irony of Earth Day cleanups 18.4.2016 TreeHugger
Though paved with the best intentions, annual litter cleanups add 12 million plastic trash bags to landfills every year; this nonprofit suggests a solution.
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Civil Rights Complainants Denounce Company’s Intimidation Tactics 12.4.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Civil Rights Complainants today denounced Green Group Holdings, owners of the Arrowhead Landfill in Uniontown, Ala., for filing a lawsuit Wednesday targeting members of Black Belt Citizens Fighting for Health and Justice. Green Group Holdings’ lawsuit was filed in federal court in Mobile, Alabama.

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How to Reduce Premature Deaths Linked to Environmental Risks 8.4.2016 Truthout.com
The World Health Organization reports that 12.6 million people die globally each year as a result of environmental exposures, such as air pollution and secondhand smoke. Luckily, there are relatively simple solutions to save lives around the world, like reducing tobacco and coal use. (Photo: Gianluca Di natale ) Millions of deaths around the world are preventable every year without any additional spending on research for treatment. And the cause has nothing to do with gun violence or war. According to a new  report  from the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 12.6 million people die globally each year as a result of environmental exposures. More than 8 million of those deaths are caused by exposures to non-infectious or parasitic forms of environmental risks, including air pollution and secondhand smoke. Low- and middle-income countries in Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific and Africa account for most of those deaths. But some of the environmental risk is coming from the United States, which ...
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Sanders and Clinton Back Bioenergy, but Activists Say It's the Wrong Alternative 7.4.2016 Truthout - All Articles
For more original Truthout election coverage, check out our election section, "Beyond the Sound Bites: Election 2016." The number one form of "renewable" energy in the United States is bioenergy, an energy source derived from burning trees, crops, manure, trash or waste for electricity and/or heat, or converting transportation fuels. According to the Energy Information Administration, 49.6 percent of renewable energy in the US in 2014 came from bioenergy; 18 percent, from wind; and 4.4 percent, from solar photovoltaics. With 82 percent of US energy generated from fossil fuels , barring a reduction in energy consumption, policies facilitating the transition away from oil, gas and coal will likely continue to rely, in large part, on bioenergy.  Bioenergy poses risks because of its carbon emissions, contributions to air pollution and freshwater demand. Bioenergy's main selling point is that, unlike foreign oil, it's a locally sourced feedstock, which means more money stays in local economies. Industry and ...
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MSF Surgeon Recalls Kunduz Strike: 'I Didn’t Need Convincing That I Was Going To Die That Night' 6.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
On October 3 2015, MSF’s trauma hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, was destroyed by precise and repeated U.S. airstrikes. The attack killed 42 people, including 14 MSF staff members, 24 patients, and four caretakers, and wounded dozens more. Since 2011, the hospital had been providing free, high-quality surgical care to victims of general trauma, such as traffic accidents, as well as patients with conflict-related injuries. It was the only facility of its kind in the northeastern region of Afghanistan. The attack has had devastating consequences for the victims, their families, MSF teams and Kunduz. Six months later, the hospital remains closed until further notice, leaving thousands of people without vital medical services. Dr. Evangeline Cua is a surgeon from the Philippines who was working in MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Center in Afghanistan when US airstrikes destroyed the hospital on October 3. Here, she shares her story of surviving that horrific night. It happened again last night. I woke up sobbing and ...
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St. Louis' West Lake Landfill: A Runaway, Ticking, Nuclear Time Bomb That Has Residents Terrified 4.4.2016 Truthout.com
EnviroNews Editors' Note: The following news piece represents the third in a 15-part mini-series titled, Nuclear Power in Our World Today, featuring nuclear authority, engineer and whistleblower Arnie Gundersen. The EnviroNews USA special encompasses a wide span of topics, ranging from Manhattan-era madness to the continuously-unfolding crisis on the ground at Fukushima Daiichi in eastern Japan. TRANSCRIPT: Excerpt From Public Meeting on West Lake Landfill: Dawn Chapman: The federal government is [the] responsible party on paper for what happens at West Lake Landfill. Crowd Member #1: And Exelon. Dawn Chapman: And Exelon will write the check for [inaudible] is our understanding. Crowd Member #2: What about Mallinckrodt? Chapman: Mallinckrodt when they entered into a contract with the DOE, the DOE took away all… Mallinckrodt signed away their ability to be charged in just about anything. They have immunity. Josh Cunnings (Narrator): Thank you for tuning in to the EnviroNews USA news desk. I'm your host ...
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How to establish a zero-waste cleaning routine 1.4.2016 TreeHugger
Minimize the number of ingredients and the tools required to keep your house clean, as well as the waste generated by the cleaning process.
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Should we be feeding food waste to livestock? 30.3.2016 Environmental News Network
Food waste is a huge global problem. About a third of the food produced globally for human consumption, approximately 1.3 billion tons each year, is wasted or lost, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Food losses in industrialized countries add up to roughly $680 billion, with $310 billion in losses in developing countries. Produce (fruits and vegetables plus roots and tubers) have the highest rates of waste. Taiwan has a simple solution to reduce food waste: Feed it to livestock. The Guardian reports that Taiwan is “one of a handful of countries that have institutionalized the practice” of feeding food scraps to livestock. About two-third’s of the country’s food waste is fed to its 5.5 million pigs. Pigs are Taiwan’s biggest source of meat.“We realized there was a lot of kitchen waste and that if we put it in incinerators it would hamper incineration because it’s wet,” Chiang Tsu-nong, deputy inspector general with the government’s Bureau of Environmental Inspection, told the ...
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Bacardi wants you to "hold the straw" with your next drink 29.3.2016 TreeHugger
Plastic disposable straws are a tremendous source of pollution, with the equivalent of 125 school buses being filled daily with trashed straws in the USA. Bacardi wants people to refuse straws outright and has made several of its venues straw-free.
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Zero Waste in San Francisco and New York: A Tale of Two Cities 28.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the goals of a sustainable city is to effectively manage material flows into and out of the city. Garbage, or what environmental engineers call solid waste, presents some of the most difficult challenges to urban sustainability. San Francisco may well be on the way to achieving their goal of "zero waste," or to divert all of its garbage away from landfills. Currently, San Francisco diverts 80% of its waste away from landfills. According to New York Times reporter Matt Richtel: "San Francisco also has a world-class reputation for its composting processes, which turns food waste into fine, coffee-like grounds that is sent to farms as fertilizer." And he observes that San Francisco is the "Silicon Valley of recycling." The city and county of San Francisco's SF Environment department has set a goal of zero waste by 2020. That formerly future-sounding date is just four years away. According to the department, about half of the waste now placed in non-recycle bins could be recycled, which would drive ...
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Toxic Coal Ash Could Be Coming to Landfill Near You -- Here's Why It Matters 22.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Power companies are closing down old, air polluting, coal-fired power plants as we move toward cleaner, more sustainable ways to generate electricity. As these plants close, they leave behind a material known as coal ash. Coal ash is a public health hazard if it is not disposed of safely. It is a dangerous substance known to cause cancer and other illnesses and must be kept out of our drinking water. Coal ash contains known carcinogens such as arsenic, lead and mercury. This is why the EPA is now regulating coal ash. As power companies shut down or upgrade their facilities while closing existing coal ash ponds, where much of this toxic material is temporarily stored, the need to permanently dispose of this hazardous byproduct is growing. We now know that some waste disposal companies have been quietly exploiting a loophole in the new EPA rules, allowing them to dump toxic coal ash into municipal solid waste landfills. So far, these companies have dumped millions of tons of coal ash into unlined landfills ...
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