User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Sep 19 2016 21:30 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Environmental Concerns -- and Anger -- Grow in Month After Thousand-Year Flood Strikes Louisiana 19.9.2016 Truthout - All Articles
In the aftermath of the 1000-year flood that hit southern Louisiana in August, environmental and public health concerns are mounting as the waters recede. Residents want to know why many areas that never flooded before were left in ruin this time, raising questions about the role water management played in potentially exacerbating the flood. The smell of mold lingers on streets where the contents from flooded homes and businesses are stacked in piles along the curbside, as well as in neighborhoods next to landfills where storm debris is taken. Polluted Floodwaters I met up with Frank Bonifay whose home and business are in the Spanish Lake Basin region, about 20 miles south of Baton Rouge.  We went to his home on Alligator Bayou Road, which for weeks after the flood was only accessible by boat.  Car in front of flooded home off Ridge Road in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, on September 2. ©2016 Julie Dermansky On our way we drove past the Honeywell Geismar chemical plant near Saint Gabriel, where workers ...
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These African Countries Don't Want Your Used Clothing Anymore 19.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This article is part of HuffPost’s “ Reclaim ” campaign, an ongoing project spotlighting the world’s waste crisis and how we can begin to solve it. Clearing your closet of last season’s gently worn clothes and donating them to an aid group probably makes you feel pretty good. After all, you may be helping someone in need and breathing life into items that might otherwise decompose in a landfill. But a number of countries in East Africa are fed up with the onslaught of secondhand items they receive from Western nonprofits and wholesalers, and want to ban such imports altogether. In 2014, a handful of East African countries imported more than $300 million worth of secondhand clothing from the United States and other wealthy countries. The used items have created a robust market in East Africa and thereby a decent amount of jobs. But experts say the vast amount of these imports have devastated local clothing industries and led the region to rely far too heavily on the West.  In March, the East African ...
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France leads the charge against single-use plastics 19.9.2016 TreeHugger
First came a ban on plastic bags, now there's a ban on disposable dishes and cutlery: How France is an impressive leader in the battle against plastic pollution.
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Global Movement Envisions a Future Free From Plastic Pollution: Major U.S. Companies Must Rise to the Challenge 17.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Today, a new global vision for a future free from plastic pollution has been released by a network of 90 NGOs. The vision lays out 10 principles with the ultimate goal being "a future free from plastic pollution." It represents the first step in a global movement to change society's perception and use of plastics.

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Why the 'Break Free From Plastic' movement is a really big deal 16.9.2016 TreeHugger
Finally, more than 100 NGOs from all around the world have joined forces to fight global plastic pollution, and they need you to join the movement.
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Zero Waste Cities: At The Forefront Of The Sustainable Development Goals Agenda 15.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A call to rethink our relationship with the stuff that we use and discard is fundamental to the sustainability agenda. Making "cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable" will prove to be one of the most critically important SDGs of this century. In particular, SDG 11.6 commits us all "by 2030, [to] reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality, municipal and other waste management". In the context of an unprecedentedly rapid pace of urban population growth - not only does most of the global population now live in cities, it is foreseen that by 2050, 70% of the population will live in the urban context , effective management of municipal solid waste poses one of the biggest challenges . Badly managed municipal solid waste contributes to resource depletion, economic lock-in, air pollution, and public health impacts such as diarrhoea, asthma, dengue fever, and other serious health effects such as cancer. ...
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This Company Makes Damaged Clothes New Again, Sells Them At A Discount 13.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This article is part of HuffPost’s “ Reclaim ” campaign, an ongoing project spotlighting the world’s waste crisis and how we can begin to solve it. As discarded clothing piles up in landfills around the country , a handful of companies are trying to save some of those garments and give them new life.  The Renewal Workshop  is one of these. It takes shirts, jackets and other items damaged during manufacturing, then repairs and resells them for 30 to 50 percent off the original price, co-founder Nicole Bassett told The Huffington Post. Its goal is to prevent imperfect items, which traditional retailers can’t sell in stores, from being tossed in the trash.  The Renewal Workshop is currently raising funds on  Indiegogo  and will begin selling these so-called “renewed” garments on its website in late October.  Companies fighting clothing waste have their work cut out for them. The average American throws out 70 pounds of clothing or household textiles a year. Only 15 percent of that  is recycled , according ...
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Meet the 22-year-olds solving the plastic waste problem 13.9.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Start-up BioCellection, founded by two 20-somethings who identified a bacteria that will eat up plastic waste, is in negotiations for the first commercial use of its polystyrene recycling technology.
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Now You Can Do Your Thrift Shopping Online, And It's About Time 8.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This article is part of HuffPost’s “ Reclaim ” campaign, an ongoing project spotlighting the world’s waste crisis and how we can begin to solve it. A slew of successful online secondhand stores has made it easier than ever for consumers to buy and sell old clothing. The leaders of the upstart industry tout the environmental benefits of this new kind of thrift shopping experience. But will it be enough to meaningfully reduce the staggering amount of textiles pouring into our landfills  every year, or is it just a way for savvy shoppers to ease their guilty consciences about the waste they produce? For now, clothing resale is too small-scale to make a dent in landfill waste. And even if it does, it should not be confused for an environmental panacea. But if it forces us to question the way we shop and rethink the way we get rid of our old stuff, it’s a step in the right direction.  “Even if we manage to come up with the ultimate technology solution, the positive impact of all of that is still outweighed by ...
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Fish scales made into biodegradable energy generator 7.9.2016 TreeHugger
Indian researchers put fish waste to good use.
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How do you beat hunger and food waste? Try compost 5.9.2016 High Country News Most Recent
ReUnity turns restaurant scraps into soil — and connects Santa Fe with rural farms in the process.
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No, Sweden does not recycle 99 percent of its waste. 30.8.2016 TreeHugger
It incinerates about half of it, which is a very different thing.
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Waste Not, Save More 24.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
On average, each person in the US  throws away five pounds of solid waste each day . While many eco-conscious citizens do their due diligence to  recycle , compost, and reduce waste, others remain  apathetic  about preserving the environment. Wherever you might land on the eco-friendly scale, innovative "Pay As You Throw" (PAYT) programs are incentivizing people nationwide to increase (or start) recycling and composting through a usage-pricing model. Basically, the less trash you send to a landfill, the less you pay. Over 7,000 communities in the  US report  using this green solution, with cities seeing an average of 45 percent less trash. Though various types of PAYT programs have been tested, waste-reduction company WasteZero reports the most cost-effective and convenient option for reducing waste is  using specialized bags . With this approach, residents purchase uniquely printed bags approved by their municipality, just like you would purchase garbage bags from a store. Trash collectors only pick up ...
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Addressing Food Waste Through Date Labeling 24.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Food waste has become a hot topic. Finding ways to waste less food and recycle unavoidable waste - such as plate scraps and peels - is on the minds of businesses, lawmakers, nonprofit organizations and consumers and there is no silver bullet solution. It will take big and small changes to yield results. We know that approximately 40 percent of the food grown in the U.S. is wasted. In fact, food waste is the single largest category of material going into our landfills. While it happens all along the supply chain, American consumers account for 44 percent of food waste sent to landfill, making households the largest source of food waste in the country. Part of that food waste, as demonstrated in studies by groups like the Harvard Law and Policy Clinic and the Institute of Food Scientists, is due to confusion over date labels, and industry is working to find a solution. One such solution is date labeling. The consumer packaged goods (CPG) and retail industries recognize consumers are confused about date ...
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Fixing America's Waste Problem 20.8.2016 Environmental News Network
America’s massive, growing landfills are the result of many decades of bad policies and decisions. And it will take a concerted, society-wide effort to solve this problem. Let’s dive deeper into just how big our landfill waste problem is and how we can begin to shift toward a circular economy.
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This Town Is Sick of Drinking Polluted Water 19.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Michelle Chen

In Alabama’s Black Belt, a region where the vestiges of slavery still manifest in chronic poverty and crumbling infrastructure, a more recent legacy of mining and industry is haunting the land through poisoned waterways and toxic soil.

Yet the region has long been the rural core of civil-rights struggles, and along the Black Belt, local citizens are trying to revive a legacy of activism as they struggle to restore their environment.

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Headlines for August 10, 2016 10.8.2016 Democracy Now!
Many See Trump's Latest Comments as Call to Assassinate Rival Clinton, Sen. Susan Collins: Trump Would Make World "More Dangerous", Emails Show Ties Between Clinton Foundation & State Dept., New York Mag: Roger Ailes Used Fox Funds to Spy on Journalists, DOJ: Baltimore Police Engage in Illegal, Racially Biased Policing, Brazil: Senators Vote to Proceed with Rousseff Impeachment, U.N.: More Than 2 Million in Aleppo Without Water or Electricity, Yemen: 20 Killed in U.S.-Backed, Saudi-Led Airstrikes, Pentagon: U.S. Approves $1 Billion Weapons Sale to Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia: Dozens of Protesters Killed by Government Forces, Greenland: Ice Melting May Unearth U.S. Military's Buried Radioactive Waste, Bolivia: State of Emergency Declared Amid Worst Wildfire in 10 Years, California: Uncontrolled Pilot Wildfire Swells by 50%, Mexico: Nearly 50 Die in Mudslides After Massive Rainfall, UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi Resigns After Student Protests
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App Lets You Buy Leftover Food From Restaurants And It's Really Cheap 10.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Here’s a situation where takeout is more cost efficient than cooking at home.  Too Good To Go , an app operating in the UK, allows users to order leftover food at a discount from restaurants, according to the website. The goal is to help curb waste from establishments that typically toss out perfectly edible food at the end of the day.   Users simply log in, pick a restaurant, and pay through the app. Then they pick up their food at designated times ― usually around closing or after peak meal times, according to the Telegraph. “Food waste just seems like one of the dumbest problems we have in this world,” co-founder James Crummie told Business Green . “The restaurant industry is wasting about 600,000 tonnes of food each year, and in the UK alone there are one million people on emergency food parcels from food banks. Why do we have these two massive social issues that are completely connected, yet there is not much going on to address them?” Users also have the option to  give meals to people in need by ...
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8 companies to watch in the circular economy 10.8.2016 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
The circular economy is anything but theoretical — startups and big companies alike already are experimenting with the concept to forge new business models and buttress existing ones. Here are eight of the most notable.
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The Positive Impact of Environmental "Gamification" 8.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Getting people excited about environmental issues can take a bit of strategy. Natural resource depletion, global warming, landfill waste and water contamination are topics that can be intimidating when presented to the average consumer, especially for the demographic we most hope to reach: young people and future stewards. With so much on the line for establishing sustainable infrastructures for future generations, it is important that we find ways to engage youth and make motivations for environmentalism positive and fun. Making complex concepts like sustainability and the importance of circular waste solutions compelling to young consumers can be a real game: literally and figuratively. One of the most popular, and effective, methods for engaging consumers is gamification, the simple concept of taking elements of a game and applying them to other areas of activity, like learning about implementing green habits. "Gamifying" environmental action campaigns has proven to be a very successful way to get ...
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