User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Jun 21 2017 23:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Rocky Flats Made Nukes. Then It Made A Mess. Now It's About To Become A Public Park. 21.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ROCKY FLATS, Colo. ― Plutonium, named for the Roman god of the underworld and the dwarf planet at the edge of the solar system, is one of the world’s most dangerous elements. Inhaling just one particle will bombard internal organs, particularly the lungs and liver, with harmful alpha radiation for decades. For the most part, it isn’t naturally occurring. But until just over a decade ago, it was plentiful in this 5,000-acre patch of rolling hills and grasslands. From 1952 to 1989, this picturesque sanctuary was home to a factory that produced plutonium triggers for nuclear weapons ― a lot of them. Nearly all of the approximately 70,000  nuclear weapons produced in the United States include a part made at Rocky Flats. It was designated as a Superfund site in the early 1990s, and the radioactive materials have been removed. It’s scheduled to open to the public for the first time next summer . But rather than welcoming the prospect of thousands of new acres for recreation, some Coloradans are suing to stop ...
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Phoenix launches a hub for the circular economy 15.6.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
A new incubator from the Arizona State University and the city of Phoenix finds ways for both public and private organizations to overhaul waste.
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With all our amazing technology, why do single-use plastics still exist? 13.6.2017 TreeHugger
It seems ludicrous that we haven't developed an alternative for this harmful and persistent material that permeates our lives and planet.
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Painting a Brighter Environmental Future 8.6.2017 Planet Ark News
The Australian paint industry is leading the way in combating waste, providing the first national program of its kind in the world.
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How the circular economy can help your company retain its competitive edge 7.6.2017 GreenBiz.com
SPONSORED: Ever sifted through a landfill? There are tons of valuable materials within. How to harness it is the basis for a vast new business opportunity.
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Margaret Atwood Has Some Fixes For A Crisis That's Slowly 'Killing Us' 7.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story is part of a series on ocean plastics . Margaret Atwood, the author behind hit Hulu series “ The Handmaid’s Tale ,” is well versed in the types of hot-button issues that polarize societies. In a new op-ed, the dystopian author says she’s also keen on tackling a devastating problem that much of the world is barely talking about: plastic waste. Atwood writes in her piece, published in The Guardian on Saturday, that she considers plastics the “modern equivalent of a universal religion.”  “We worship them, whether we admit it or not,” she explains. “Their centre is whatever you happen to be doing, their circumference is everywhere; they’re as essential to our modern lives as the air we breathe, and they’re killing us. They must be stopped.” In Atwood’s lifetime, the world went from barely using any plastic to being unable to live without it. Plastic is cheap, and can be found in pretty much everything we use ― from clothing to diapers to shopping bags. We just as readily discard these products ...
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See Old Chopsticks Turned Into Cool Home Decor 6.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This startup is on a mission to put your sushi addiction to good use ― by saving the environment. ChopValue collects used chopsticks from restaurants in Vancouver, Canada, and turns them into everything from tabletops to shelves to coasters. The idea is to recycle wooden and bamboo chopsticks that would otherwise be tossed in the trash after one meal. “It tells the story of how much underutilized resources we have in the urban environment,” founder Felix Böck told HuffPost. “We’re not artists or environmentalists ― it’s a viable business approach.” ChopValue retrieves discarded chopsticks each week from 65 local restaurants that collect them in bins distributed by the startup. Since its launch last July, the company has recycled around 2.5 million chopsticks ― currently collecting around 250,000 chopsticks per week. Chopsticks are one example of many single-use  products ― like straws or plastic cups ― that environmentalists decry for their wastefulness. Vancouver alone sends at least  100,000 chopsticks ...
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This wood & wool box could be a green alternative to foam coolers 2.6.2017 TreeHugger
WooBox uses two old-school materials to redesign an eco-friendly container for transporting fresh food.
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'Unboxing' videos distract from the real problem of packaging waste 1.6.2017 TreeHugger
What happens to the plastic, ribbon, cardboard, and glitter after the two-minute show is over?
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Why You Should Stop Feeding Your Baby From Trendy Little Food Pouches 29.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story is part of a series on ocean plastics . For the over-stretched parent who doesn’t have time to puree plums or soak grains overnight, portable plastic packs jammed with organic and healthful ingredients are a godsend. On-the-go moms can just twist off the cap and hand a pouch of blueberry flax and oat to a hungry baby to suck on by himself. No spoon or spoon skills required. While these packs are pricey ― a 4-ounce pouch can cost north of $2  ― families are willing to fork over the funds for the convenience factor. But this convenience comes with another price: Most of these plastic pouches can’t be recycled and are destined for landfills ― or worse, the oceans. The demand is growing even though reasonably priced alternatives are available that can be used over and over again.  The problem with the disposable pouches is that they’re made from multiple layers of materials and the recyclable components can’t be separated out, said Brent Bell, vice president of recycling at Waste Management, the ...
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Why Waste-To-Energy Plants Are Problematic 26.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Many Americans don’t know where their trash goes after tossing it. Out of sight, out of mind. They don’t know where their municipal landfill is located or that an incinerator is nearby, ready to burn their waste. That disconnect makes it easy for Americans to discard waste, especially if they’re never forced to confront it. This is a serious problem. Americans waste over 250 million tons of resources every year. We’re the largest generator of waste globally. Roughly 33 million tons of those resources are burned, 136 million tons are buried under ground, and only 89 million tons are recycled or composted. Meanwhile, the vulnerable communities and environments on the receiving end of that trash disposal process are negatively impacted on a daily basis. Case Study: Westchester County, New York State Take New York State’s Westchester County, for example, which is just north of New York City and has been home to some of America’s most powerful politicians, including, most recently, Hillary Clinton and Donald ...
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Why plastic straws should be taxed 26.5.2017 TreeHugger
A small charge has helped people move away from plastic shopping bags, so why not the same approach for straws?
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Here's How Long Your Trash Will Hang Around After You're Dead 22.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story is part of a series on ocean plastics . Some things you toss in the trash will have a longer life span on this planet than you will ― and that’s not good news for the environment.   Americans generated 258 million tons of trash in 2014, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While some of this trash gets recycled or composted, most of it ends up in landfills, where it releases  greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change . A lot of it also ends up in the oceans , where animals can eat  it or get harmed by it ― particularly if it’s plastic trash like bottle caps or fishing nets. And while an apple core might take just two months to decompose, a plastic water bottle can take up to 450 years , according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. What’s more, plastics may never fully disappear , scientists say. When plastic trash is dumped into the ocean, for example, it breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces known as  microplastics . Fish and shellfish eat ...
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In elk poaching case, a glimpse of a simmering land conflict 20.5.2017 High Country News Most Recent
An Oregon rancher is charged for an elk slaughter.
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How I Broke Up With Plastic 17.5.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
19 plastic to-go containers 30 plastic bottles *I’ve also saved about 14 paper bags over the same period. It turns out that choosing paper or even biodegradable  plastic over regular plastic isn’t necessarily better. The best practice is to reduce the usage of all single-use items, no matter what they’re made of. My breakup with throwaway plastics didn’t always go smoothly. I failed to fulfill the basic criteria of the experiment on at least three occasions. Once, I accidentally (I swear!) opened and started drinking a bottle of mineral water offered to me at a concert. It reminded me of how mindlessly and instinctively I use plastic products. The second time was when I went to an Indian restaurant to order takeaway for lunch and forgot to bring my own container — and that sambar rice was too enticing to pass up. (Full disclosure: I have no regrets. it was delicious). The third instance occurred when I went to the supermarket without my own bag (d’oh!) and, faced with way too much to carry, I accepted ...
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How I Broke Up With Plastic 17.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
19 plastic to-go containers 30 plastic bottles *I’ve also saved about 14 paper bags over the same period. It turns out that choosing paper or even biodegradable  plastic over regular plastic isn’t necessarily better. The best practice is to reduce the usage of all single-use items, no matter what they’re made of. My breakup with throwaway plastics didn’t always go smoothly. I failed to fulfill the basic criteria of the experiment on at least three occasions. Once, I accidentally (I swear!) opened and started drinking a bottle of mineral water offered to me at a concert. It reminded me of how mindlessly and instinctively I use plastic products. The second time was when I went to an Indian restaurant to order takeaway for lunch and forgot to bring my own container — and that sambar rice was too enticing to pass up. (Full disclosure: I have no regrets. it was delicious). The third instance occurred when I went to the supermarket without my own bag (d’oh!) and, faced with way too much to carry, I accepted ...
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How Do We Do Better With Our Food Waste? 16.5.2017 Planet Ark News
According to ABC TV's War On Waste series, each week the average Australian family throws out 20% of the food they buy. That's one in every five bags of groceries! This adds up to 3.3 million tonnes of food a year, enough to fill the MCG 6 times over. So what can we do to, basically, just do better?
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A Small Senate Victory Maintains Methane Regulation 15.5.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The Trump administration’s relentless march to repeal federal regulations is not limited to environmental rules, but the environment is a real target. The shame of these attacks is that rather than seeking to improve and refine our approach to environmental protection, we see a destructive effort at dismantling the structure of environmental law. The attack thus far has focused on Obama-era executive orders, since those are easier to change than rules issued by EPA, sometimes under court order, to implement specific statutory requirements. Writing in the New York Times last week, environmental journalist Coral Davenport reported that: …the Senate voted on Wednesday to uphold an Obama-era climate change regulation to control the release of methane from oil and gas wells on public land. Senators voted 51 to 49 to block consideration of a resolution to repeal the 2016 Interior Department rule to curb emissions of methane, a powerful planet-warming greenhouse gas. Senators John McCain of Arizona, Lindsey ...
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10 Things You're Not Doing (But Should) To Help The Ocean 12.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story is part of a series on ocean plastics . Plastics are overwhelming our oceans and landfills. Every year, an estimated 19 billion pounds of plastic garbage end up in the sea. In the U.S. alone, approximately 56 billion pounds of plastic are dumped annually in landfills. Worryingly, it remains unknown exactly how all these plastics ― which don’t biodegrade and could linger in the environment for centuries ― could impact human health and the world around us. But here’s a heartening truth: We can all do something to mitigate this growing plastics crisis. Yes, all. From entrepreneurs and corporations who need to rethink the way plastic products are designed and manufactured; to lawmakers who can push for the protection of fragile environments from plastic pollution; to individuals (that means you) whose seemingly small daily actions can add up to something huge, we all have a role to play.  “The one thing I’ve learned in doing my research is that population density is a huge driver of ocean ...
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Bingo Winning The Recycling Game 12.5.2017 Planet Ark News
Leading waste management and recycling company expands with new facility and public listing on ASX.
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