User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Jul 02 2016 02:24 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trash by the numbers: Startling statistics about US garbage 2.7.2016 TreeHugger
Americans do everything with gusto, including generating waste.
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The EPA Could Have Protected These People From Breathing Coal Dust Every Day. So Why Didn't It? 30.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
BOKOSHE, Oklahoma — Here in the land of wind-whipped, rolling plains, the gray dust, which sparkles in just the right light, seems inescapable. Residents of this town near the Arkansas line say they have spotted it on their grass, trees, ponds, barns, furniture and cars. The source of Bokoshe’s enduring misery is coal ash, an often-toxic byproduct of burning coal for electricity. Clouds of it, swirling like tornadoes at times, descend upon people while they sit in their yards and mow their lawns. The powdery material clogs swimming pools, air conditioners and chicken coops. The ash, which contains harmful metals such as arsenic, chromium and lead, comes from a state-permitted disposal pit — operated by a company named Making Money Having Fun — fed by a power plant eight miles outside of town. Residents here began complaining about the dust to state regulators in 1998. More than a decade later, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency got involved and in 2014 finally acknowledged that the pit has shown ...
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Food Crusader Battling Walmart Could Emerge Victorious — With Your Help 29.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Walmart is the white whale to Jordan Figueiredo's Captain Ahab -- at once the elusive target and the mammoth opponent of the 37-year-old food activist’s obsessive, years-long crusade. The California-based municipal recycling expert just wants the world’s biggest retailer to start selling misshapen, dinged-up fruits and vegetables. “In terms of sustainability, social benefits and even from a PR standpoint for grocers, it’s low-hanging fruit, literally,” said Figueiredo. “Walmart has so many stores -- if they start selling ugly fruits and vegetables, everyone can.” Figueiredo spends more than 25 hours a week outside his day job for the Castro Valley, California, city government working on his fruit and vegetable campaign. For much of the last decade, he has campaigned to reduce the roughly 40 percent of food that each year goes uneaten, most of which ends up in landfills, where it rots and emits planet-warming methane into the atmosphere. That’s an appalling statistic when you consider that one in seven ...
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Walmart Refuses To Sell 'Ugly' Fruits And Vegetables. That Needs To Change. 29.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Walmart is the white whale to Jordan Figueiredo's Captain Ahab -- at once the elusive target and the mammoth opponent of the 37-year-old food activist’s obsessive, years-long crusade. The California-based municipal recycling expert just wants the world’s biggest retailer to start selling misshapen, dinged-up fruits and vegetables. “In terms of sustainability, social benefits and even from a PR standpoint for grocers, it’s low-hanging fruit, literally,” said Figueiredo. “Walmart has so many stores -- if they start selling ugly fruits and vegetables, everyone can.” Figueiredo spends more than 25 hours a week outside his day job for the Castro Valley, California, city government working on his fruit and vegetable campaign. For much of the last decade, he has campaigned to reduce the roughly 40 percent of food that each year goes uneaten, most of which ends up in landfills, where it rots and emits planet-warming methane into the atmosphere. That’s an appalling statistic when you consider that one in seven ...
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What Brexit might mean for climate, energy, pollution and yes, light bulbs 28.6.2016 TreeHugger
It's the Telegraph newspaper trying to convince people to vote leave, but it is indicative.
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Small-town mayor tells Toronto to keeps its own trash 28.6.2016 TreeHugger
The city doesn't like to deal with its own trash, preferring to outsource the dirty work to smaller communities, but now the community of Ingersoll is fighting back fiercely.
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This Walmart Worker Threw Away Food On The Job, Then Went Home Hungry 28.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When David Alvarez worked at a Walmart in Tampa, Florida, he regularly chucked unsold tomatoes, potatoes and bananas into compost bins behind the store. Meanwhile, the food on his own table was much less fulfilling -- sandwiches, ramen noodles, milk. It was all he could afford, he said. Alvarez felt like he was "starving to death,” he told The Huffington Post. “I’d been on food stamps the whole time I’d been out there at Walmart, because you just cannot make it on what they pay.” For most of his time as a “produce associate,” Alvarez, 56, made $9.15 an hour -- about a buck more than the Florida minimum wage , but not enough to eat well, he noted. Alvarez was fired in March, he said, for speaking at a rally in support of a $15-an-hour minimum wage. Kevin Gardner, a Walmart spokesperson, told HuffPost that Alvarez was laid off for violating company policies, though he declined to specify which ones. But Alvarez’s time working for Walmart revealed a disappointing truth: Stores regularly toss food that is ...
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Committing to recycling the “non-recyclable” 27.6.2016 TreeHugger
Companies and manufacturers are creating custom solutions for their difficult-to-recycle waste
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Where Did 'Dumpster Fire' Come From? Where Is It Rolling? 24.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In 2009, sportswriter Mike Wise had just started a radio show at 106.7 The Fan , a Washington D.C.-area sports station. Wise, now a senior writer at The Undefeated, noticed that one of his work buddies, a traffic reporter at the station named Liz Drabick , had an evocative pet phrase. "Whenever someone was having a really bad day, or someone was completely out of sorts, she'd just go, 'Oh man, guy's a dumpster fire.' Or she'd go, 'Oh, that whole organization is a dumpster fire,'" Wise recalled in a phone conversation recently. "And I was like, Hey, that's pretty good." That very year, he used it in a column about the Washington football team, writing, "[I]f Jim Zorn has to answer one more question about his job security, it's time to also hold the coach's players and his superiors accountable for this dumpster fire -- this abomination of a loss." Wise was hardly the first to commit a metaphorical "dumpster fire" to print, but 2009 was a different time. His smidgen of hesitation as to whether his readers ...
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Sustainability Is More Than Recycling 23.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A dozen years ago sustainability was an uncommon word, and was used occasionally to describe anything that would maintain over time. Then the term gained new meaning as increasingly scientific studies were published with data relating to climate change and its impact on our planet. Former Vice-President Al Gore was one of the first who took those data and tried to make them understandable to the common citizen, which was much needed because scientists tend to communicate in their own jargon, and mainly to their colleagues. The problem with this situation is that when the information that the scientists are holding has a serious impact on how we live, eat, produce, travel, shop, or entertain, we, the public, should have access to it and understand it. Journalists can play an important role here in growing the understanding of their public audiences, since when interviewing experts in the area, journalists can persuade the scientists to translate their knowledge into examples or analogies that a ...
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Following Truthout Investigations, Senate Seeks Alternatives to Burning Military Waste in Open Air 21.6.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Senate recently approved an amendment to the omnibus defense-spending bill designed to pressure the military to move away from openly burning and detonating stockpiles of leftover munitions and other explosive and hazardous wastes at open-air facilities. If approved, a congressional study on alternatives would be a crucial step toward ending the open burning of military waste stockpiles. (Photo: Pixabay ) The Senate recently approved an amendment to the omnibus defense-spending bill designed to pressure the military to move away from openly burning and detonating stockpiles of leftover munitions and other explosive and hazardous wastes at open-air facilities. An amendment to the Senate's version of the National Defense Authorization Act would require the National Academy of Sciences to review the military's massive stockpile of demilitarized munitions and study available and emerging technology that could replace the practice of "open burning, open detonation" for disposing of hazardous and explosive ...
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Hot Mess: States Struggle to Deal with Radioactive Fracking Waste 21.6.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Jie Jenny Zou, Center for Public Integrity

This story was produced in collaboration with the Ohio Valley ReSource, a public media partnership covering Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.

The Marcellus Shale has transformed the Appalachian Basin into an energy juggernaut. Even amid a recent drilling slowdown, regional daily production averages enough natural gas to power more than 200,000 U.S. homes for a year.  

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Edible Cups Let You Throw One Back Without Creating Waste 16.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Now you can have your drink -- and eat it, too. Tableware company Loliware sells disposable cups that are both biodegradable and edible -- or in their words, “biodegr(edible).” The idea is that by creating tableware that can be eaten -- or that will quickly degrade if thrown out, according to their website -- consumers can avoid the usual waste that comes from trashing plastic cups at the end of a party. "You can throw them in the grass or disintegrate them in a matter of minutes with hot water," co-founder Chelsea Briganti told the Guardian . "For every cup eaten, we are saving a plastic cup from entering the landfill. Billions of plastic cups are entering the landfill every year. If Loliware replaces even a small percentage, that would have far-reaching impact." Plastics are a major problem: An estimated  8 million tons of plastics leak into the ocean each year, meaning the oceans may contain more plastic than fish by 2050 . Loliware cups avoid this waste issue by being compostable, degrading into soil ...
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Recycling Industrial Waste Materials 16.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Waste outputs for industrial materials like solvents, paints, oils and adhesives are difficult to deal with. Either laden with or exposed to chemicals hazardous to humans and the environment, the proper disposal and containment of these products and their packaging is highly regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and cannot typically be captured or processed by municipal waste systems. Companies, manufacturers and small businesses are thereby responsible for the private management of this waste, which typically entails linear disposal solutions like incineration, land disposal and underground injection wells . Industrial waste materials must be disposed of properly and safely , but like all types of waste, viable waste solutions are contingent upon economics . There is little economic incentive to employ other solutions for discarded industrial waste materials in addition to the usual linear disposal, which is often quite costly to begin with. Non-linear technologies for hazardous ...
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Environmental Justice Activists in Alabama Fight $30 Million Defamation Lawsuit 10.6.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Coal ash at the Arrowhead Landfill in Uniontown, Alabama, on August 20, 2009. (Meggan Haller / The New York Times) Free speech is enshrined in the American ethos. It is a core principle of the Constitution, protected by the First Amendment, and has been defended for centuries in the courts. In Uniontown, Alabama, however, a group of concerned citizens-turned-environmental justice activists are facing a challenge to their basic right to speech, for the simple act of speaking out against the disposal of millions of tons of coal ash in a local landfill.   In April, Green Group Holdings and Howling Coyote, owners of the Arrowhead Landfill, sued four Uniontown residents for defamation. The residents -- Esther Calhoun, Benjamin Eaton, Mary Schaeffer, and Ellis Long -- are members of Black Belt Citizens Fighting for Health and Social Justice , an environmental justice citizens' group that has organized against the waste disposal facility. The group is concerned about health and environmental impacts associated ...
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The State of Reuse in North America: Perception, Reality and Opportunity 9.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In today's society, as we see more and more people try to find sustainably-sourced materials and live 'green,' one would think that awareness about reuse and what it means as we move toward zero waste and the circular economy would be high. Or, at least, higher than it has been in decades. However, a recent survey found that people underestimate how much they throw out and how important reuse is to reducing their clothing footprint. To better understand why people do and do not reuse and actions we can take to change this behavior, we, Savers , commissioned a survey of 3,000 North Americans. The survey revealed the public's misconceptions about how much they throw away, but also their misunderstanding of the options available for keeping reusable items out of landfills, especially for clothing and textiles. It also showed that people greatly underestimate the power of reuse, including how it helps support local communities and positively impacts the environment. On a hopeful note, the study also ...
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The Green Cone is a backyard solar digester that reduces 90% of food waste 8.6.2016 TreeHugger
This ingenious digester/composter, made in Ontario, is the simple, natural way to divert food waste from landfills.
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Festival Camping Should Not Be a Throwaway Experience 7.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Elizabeth Glazner The Bonnaroo Music + Arts Festival will present 150 performances over four days at a 700-acre farm in rural Tennessee beginning Thursday. In its 15th year, the event is one of many major corporate-owned and profitable grand-scale productions descended from Woodstock, the fabled 1969 music and arts festival that devolved into brilliant but utter chaos because way too many fans jammed its 600-acre pastural site, which then got soaked with unexpected rain. Beer cans, glass bottles, rotting food, makeshift latrines, clothing, drug paraphernalia, cookware, chairs, sleeping bags, and even camping tents were all left behind by Woodstock's 400,000 attendees. According to anthropologist/blogger Corey McQuinn in a post "Free Love is a Battlefield: The Archaeology of Woodstock 1969," the festival's promoters flew over the once-bucolic cow pasture after the event and saw a giant peace sign made from the immense pile of trash. RELATED: The Music Industry's Battle Against Plastic Junk | Partying ...
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Election Fraud Hits Roque De La Fuente, Presidential Candidate 3.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
For Tuesday's primary, Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente will appear on the ballot as a Presidential contender for the Democrats. A millionaire businessman and entrepreneur for 41 years, he has rubbed elbows with Governor and President Ronald Reagan many times. JF: Why are you running for President of the United States? RD: Because John Kennedy is not running, Ronald Reagan is not running, Martin Luther King is not running, or anybody I think would make a big difference. If I saw someone that I believe could do a good job, I would have stayed home and watched the race from outside. JF: I understand you wanting to pull on the heartstrings of those who loved Reagan. RD: When he was President, I actually voted for him. JF: Let's assume we've gone through the primary and you're not the nominee for the Democratic Party. How would you attain ballot access and in how many states? RD: Let's talk about the Democratic Party. There are currently a total of 50 states and 6 territories. I was able to qualify in 46 of them. ...
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Big News on Coal Ash Pollution, in North Carolina and Beyond 1.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The drama surrounding the cleanup of dangerous, leaking coal ash ponds continues to unfold in North Carolina. Last week the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) announced its assessmen t of the state's many polluted sites and earlier this week the state legislature proposed changes to the existing law governing coal ash cleanup. But before we dig into the details, let's be clear about what's at stake. Clean water is one of those things that many of us, thankfully, can take for granted. We trust what comes out of our taps; and we should, as no one should have to fear that this essential ingredient in our daily lives poses a danger. Sadly, that's simply not the case for many folks facing the threat of toxic coal ash contamination in their drinking water. Coal ash is a waste byproduct of burning coal, and it's produced in huge amounts (it's the s econd biggest waste stream in the US , after municipal garbage). Coal ash often is stored in ponds near the power plant where it was made and, because most ...
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