User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Jan 13 2017 21:29 IST RSS 2.0
 
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On Food Waste, the US could learn a lot from Europe 13.1.2017 Environmental News Network
The U.S. tosses a staggering $161 billion worth of food every year. While numerous efforts are underway to address that problem, they are taking place mostly at the local level or in the business sector. While that is necessary, national- and international-level policy has a role to play as well. And that is one area in which Europe is far ahead.
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IoT and Smart City trends boost smart waste collection market 10.1.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Data, data everywhere... even in your trash bin.
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Is IoT the secret ingredient for tackling food waste? 10.1.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Whole Foods is among the early adopters for its Grind2Energy service, now powered by the Internet of Things.
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Three Activist Victories That Flew Under the Radar Over the Holidays 4.1.2017 Truthout.com
Military veterans and tribal leaders march along Highway 1806 in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on December 5, 2016. The Portland City Council has voted to temporarily halt new investments in all corporate securities until it considers a proposal to end investments in companies that have financed the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline and other human rights violations. (Photo: Alyssa Schukar / The New York Times) There were three reasons to celebrate a little this winter holiday -- a court order favoring Flint residents who have no access to safe drinking water; a Portland city council decision to temporarily halt investments under pressure from divestment activists; and a defense bill amendment aimed at reducing military pollution. Military veterans and tribal leaders march along Highway 1806 in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on December 5, 2016. The Portland City Council has voted to temporarily halt new investments in all corporate securities until it considers a proposal to end investments in ...
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Five Easy Changes For a Lower Waste Lifestyle 4.1.2017 Planet Ark News
Get your new year off to a green start with a few simple actions that will soon become easy habits. Adopting a lower waste lifestyle is easier that you might think.
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TerraCycle 2016 Recap: Looking Back on Our 15th Year 31.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This year was one of historic significance. The global community had a front-row seat to developments on the world-stage of international politics, the movements of which have implications for this coming year and all those to follow. More connected by technology than ever, the world's citizens engaged in discussions of pressing issues like human rights and environmental sustainability, speaking to an increased willingness to convert values into action. At TerraCycle, 2016 notched a decade and a half of dedication to the circular economy, corporate social responsibility and the renewal of the world's finite resources. Through free recycling programs, custom recycling solutions and partnerships with some of the world's largest companies, TerraCycle so far has engaged more than 60 million people to recycle in 23 countries, diverting nearly 4 billion units of difficult-to-recycle waste from landfills and incinerators and raising $15 million for charity. Milestones this year include the launch of new ...
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Zero waste is a priority for Maori communities in New Zealand 29.12.2016 TreeHugger
A group called Para Kore has been working since 2009 to spread the message of waste reduction and diversion.
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You Won't Believe How Much Crap Americans Throw Out Over The Holidays 20.12.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This article is part of HuffPost’s Reclaim  campaign, an ongoing project spotlighting the world’s waste crisis and how we can begin to solve it. The spirit of giving is in full force, but with it comes a whole lot of garbage. Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, Americans generate an additional 1 million tons of household waste, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.  One million tons sure sounds like a lot, but it’s not all that surprising when you consider how our consumption habits have evolved when it comes to the holidays.  Increased online sales translate into a surplus of packaging waste. Wrapping gifts sends massive amounts of decorative paper to landfills. And cooking up heaping quantities of food at gatherings means plenty of leftovers in the trash. “The magnitude is what really blows your mind with this one,” said Nicole Civita, a professor and director of the Food Recovery Project with the University of Arkansas School of Law and assistant director of the Rian Fried Center for ...
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Dreamy Danish holiday workshop village is entirely built from trash 20.12.2016 TreeHugger
Artist Thomas Dambo and his team of elves built this wonderful recycled village in Copenhagen where DIYers can make all of their gifts for free.
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Birds Are Becoming Totally Dependent On Our Delicious Landfills 15.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This article is part of HuffPost’s Reclaim campaign, an ongoing project spotlighting the world’s waste crisis and how we can begin to solve it. Conservationists and those concerned about human hunger pretty much agree that the enormous amount of food wasted around the world is a huge problem — and that concerted efforts to reduce food waste are a good thing. But while tackling the issue of food waste, it’s important to consider how doing so could have some unintended, negative consequences for the natural world, says Professor Iain Gordon , deputy vice chancellor of tropical environments and societies at Australia’s James Cook University. Gordon, who has spent his career studying biodiversity and promoting sustainable land use, has researched how some animal species — particularly birds — have become dependent on human food waste. Reducing food waste without taking that into consideration, he says, could have devastating consequences for those species. In many cases, Gordon says, the animals became ...
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Kolkata Wins C40 Award For Best Solid Waste Project Of 2016 2.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Kolkata was honoured today at an awards ceremony in Mexico City. The C40 Cities Awards recognize the world's most inspiring and innovative cities tackling climate change. Sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies and BYD, the C40 Cities Awards ceremony was held during the C40 Mayors Summit, where more than 40 mayors from around the world gathered to create sustainable and liveable cities for citizens. "On behalf of C40, I want to congratulate all the winning cities for their commitment to their citizens and their dedication to tackling climate change," said outgoing C40 Chair and Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes. "Throughout my tenure as C40 Chair, I have been increasingly impressed by the calibre of the C40 Cities Award winners, and I look forward to seeing other mayors around the world adapting and implementing these models in their own cities." "The C40 Cities Awards recognize the best and boldest work being done by mayors to fight climate change and protect people from risks," said C40 President of the ...
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How to Reduce Spending and Your Eco-Footprint This Christmas 1.12.2016 Planet Ark News
With Australians spending over $1,000 at Christmas, some forward planning for meals and presents can lead to big savings for your wallet and eco-footprint.
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How to love a weird and perfect wilderness 28.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A desolate Oregon landscape offers lessons on the modern wild.
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TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky makes garbage the hero 18.11.2016 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Here's how one creative startup made the business case for recycling common trash such as paint, gum and cigarettes into everyday commodities.
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21 Reasons Why Plastic Bottles Ruin Everything: Recycling Won't Fix It, Zero Waste Will. 18.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Drinking from plastic bottles has become such an everyday way of life that many people don't even think about what they are made from, or where they really go after we're done with them. Each American throws out an average of 21 lbs (9.5kg) of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic bottles per year - 200 to 500 bottles per person.[1] That's quite a bit of plastic waste, just to have a drink. We are regularly reminded to recycle, and often hear about how much waste plastic is floating in the ocean . But that's all after these bottles have been created. What about the tsunami of environmental impact involved in manufacturing all this plastic before we even throw them away? Einstein once said, "Intellectuals solve problems, geniuses prevent them." So let's trace the life of a disposable plastic bottle to see why prevention of disposable plastic (not using it in the first place) is the real key to fighting pollution. #1 The key ingredient used to make plastic bottles is crude oil Manufacturing a quart ...
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16 more tips for living without plastic 17.11.2016 TreeHugger
Plastic-free living requires careful and conscientious consumer choices. Here are more ideas to help you along the journey.
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This new gadget promises to transform food scraps into fertilizer in 24 hours 16.11.2016 TreeHugger
The Zera Food Recycler, from Whirlpool Corporation's innovation incubator, WLabs, is a residential "composting" appliance for kitchen scraps.
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Think Outside the Bin 16.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's becoming second nature to throw food scraps in the compost and empty boxes into the recycle bin. But what about unwanted clothing? There's a responsible place for these items too, and it's not your garbage can. When we consider our waste stream, it's clear there are barriers preventing people from properly disposing of unwanted clothing, turning our landfills into laundry piles. Not everyone is aware that clothing and textiles can be reused or recycled, or how to donate these items to keep them out of landfills. This America Recycles Day , harness the power of reuse by thinking outside of your blue recycling bin and challenging yourself and others to make sure clothing doesn't end up in the trash. Spread the word Because clothing is such an essential part of our lives, it's easy to overlook the overwhelmingly negative impact it has on our environment. Consider this: manufacturing a single cotton T-shirt uses up to 700 gallons of water, and after it's tossed into a trash can and left in a landfill to ...
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The Future of Our Environment Depends on This Business Trend 14.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Image Credit Ever since the industrial revolution, we've been polluting our environment with wasteful byproducts. Once we realized how much damage was being caused, society has taken several huge strides towards mitigating this risk. We're researching and developing alternative sources of renewable energy. We're recycling our materials, and each member of our society is making changes to reduce their carbon footprint. More to be Done Unfortunately, it's not quite enough. There are still several severe issues that we haven't managed to solve. Plastics, for example, are major pollutants . They don't biodegrade. Instead of breaking down into tiny particles, they negatively impact the ecology of both land and sea. Worldwide, billions of tons of plastic are consumed worldwide, and most of this ends up in the environment. Sure, we can recycle some of this material, but not all of it can be saved. Most of the time, the typical recovery rate is around 60%. Why We Need Sustainable Packaging Since we haven't found ...
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The Closed Loop Fund, at age two, goes with the flow 14.11.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Can some of the world's largest brands foment a surge in recycling? All it takes is lots of money and grit. A status report.
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