User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Aug 24 2016 21:09 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Waste Not, Save More 24.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
On average, each person in the US  throws away five pounds of solid waste each day . While many eco-conscious citizens do their due diligence to  recycle , compost, and reduce waste, others remain  apathetic  about preserving the environment. Wherever you might land on the eco-friendly scale, innovative "Pay As You Throw" (PAYT) programs are incentivizing people nationwide to increase (or start) recycling and composting through a usage-pricing model. Basically, the less trash you send to a landfill, the less you pay. Over 7,000 communities in the  US report  using this green solution, with cities seeing an average of 45 percent less trash. Though various types of PAYT programs have been tested, waste-reduction company WasteZero reports the most cost-effective and convenient option for reducing waste is  using specialized bags . With this approach, residents purchase uniquely printed bags approved by their municipality, just like you would purchase garbage bags from a store. Trash collectors only pick up ...
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Addressing Food Waste Through Date Labeling 24.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Food waste has become a hot topic. Finding ways to waste less food and recycle unavoidable waste - such as plate scraps and peels - is on the minds of businesses, lawmakers, nonprofit organizations and consumers and there is no silver bullet solution. It will take big and small changes to yield results. We know that approximately 40 percent of the food grown in the U.S. is wasted. In fact, food waste is the single largest category of material going into our landfills. While it happens all along the supply chain, American consumers account for 44 percent of food waste sent to landfill, making households the largest source of food waste in the country. Part of that food waste, as demonstrated in studies by groups like the Harvard Law and Policy Clinic and the Institute of Food Scientists, is due to confusion over date labels, and industry is working to find a solution. One such solution is date labeling. The consumer packaged goods (CPG) and retail industries recognize consumers are confused about date ...
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Fixing America's Waste Problem 20.8.2016 Environmental News Network
America’s massive, growing landfills are the result of many decades of bad policies and decisions. And it will take a concerted, society-wide effort to solve this problem. Let’s dive deeper into just how big our landfill waste problem is and how we can begin to shift toward a circular economy.
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This Town Is Sick of Drinking Polluted Water 19.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Michelle Chen

In Alabama’s Black Belt, a region where the vestiges of slavery still manifest in chronic poverty and crumbling infrastructure, a more recent legacy of mining and industry is haunting the land through poisoned waterways and toxic soil.

Yet the region has long been the rural core of civil-rights struggles, and along the Black Belt, local citizens are trying to revive a legacy of activism as they struggle to restore their environment.

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Headlines for August 10, 2016 10.8.2016 Democracy Now!
Many See Trump's Latest Comments as Call to Assassinate Rival Clinton, Sen. Susan Collins: Trump Would Make World "More Dangerous", Emails Show Ties Between Clinton Foundation & State Dept., New York Mag: Roger Ailes Used Fox Funds to Spy on Journalists, DOJ: Baltimore Police Engage in Illegal, Racially Biased Policing, Brazil: Senators Vote to Proceed with Rousseff Impeachment, U.N.: More Than 2 Million in Aleppo Without Water or Electricity, Yemen: 20 Killed in U.S.-Backed, Saudi-Led Airstrikes, Pentagon: U.S. Approves $1 Billion Weapons Sale to Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia: Dozens of Protesters Killed by Government Forces, Greenland: Ice Melting May Unearth U.S. Military's Buried Radioactive Waste, Bolivia: State of Emergency Declared Amid Worst Wildfire in 10 Years, California: Uncontrolled Pilot Wildfire Swells by 50%, Mexico: Nearly 50 Die in Mudslides After Massive Rainfall, UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi Resigns After Student Protests
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App Lets You Buy Leftover Food From Restaurants And It's Really Cheap 10.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Here’s a situation where takeout is more cost efficient than cooking at home.  Too Good To Go , an app operating in the UK, allows users to order leftover food at a discount from restaurants, according to the website. The goal is to help curb waste from establishments that typically toss out perfectly edible food at the end of the day.   Users simply log in, pick a restaurant, and pay through the app. Then they pick up their food at designated times ― usually around closing or after peak meal times, according to the Telegraph. “Food waste just seems like one of the dumbest problems we have in this world,” co-founder James Crummie told Business Green . “The restaurant industry is wasting about 600,000 tonnes of food each year, and in the UK alone there are one million people on emergency food parcels from food banks. Why do we have these two massive social issues that are completely connected, yet there is not much going on to address them?” Users also have the option to  give meals to people in need by ...
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8 companies to watch in the circular economy 10.8.2016 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
The circular economy is anything but theoretical — startups and big companies alike already are experimenting with the concept to forge new business models and buttress existing ones. Here are eight of the most notable.
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The Positive Impact of Environmental "Gamification" 8.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Getting people excited about environmental issues can take a bit of strategy. Natural resource depletion, global warming, landfill waste and water contamination are topics that can be intimidating when presented to the average consumer, especially for the demographic we most hope to reach: young people and future stewards. With so much on the line for establishing sustainable infrastructures for future generations, it is important that we find ways to engage youth and make motivations for environmentalism positive and fun. Making complex concepts like sustainability and the importance of circular waste solutions compelling to young consumers can be a real game: literally and figuratively. One of the most popular, and effective, methods for engaging consumers is gamification, the simple concept of taking elements of a game and applying them to other areas of activity, like learning about implementing green habits. "Gamifying" environmental action campaigns has proven to be a very successful way to get ...
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Watch How Mountains Of Trash Spread Across The U.S. Over 100 Years 6.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Americans create a lot of trash ― 254 million tons of it each year. But the landfills that house all that garbage aren’t distributed equally. The recent  Land of Waste report from Save on Energy, a company that lets consumers compare electricity plans, uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data to visualize the spread of landfills across the U.S. and track which states are holding the most trash. Their graphic shows landfills opening and closing across the country, going back one hundred years. Each dot represents a landfill; the larger the dot, the larger the area of the landfill it represents. Landfills that are currently open are in red, while those that have closed are in green. In the early 1900s, dumps were essentially just holes in the ground , and cities also disposed of trash in wetlands and in the ocean. In 1976, a federal law passed  requiring landfills to be lined to keep harmful runoff from leaching into the groundwater. The “leachate” is collected and treated.  The Save on Energy report ...
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These Guys Are Not Your Typical Garbage Collectors 3.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
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Here's Why You Should Pay $125 To Eat In A Dumpster 3.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The next time you splurge on a meal, consider hitting up a dumpster. That’s a possibility now thanks to Salvage Supperclub , which hosts dinners in dumpsters and makes meals from  ingredients that would otherwise have ended up in a landfill.  The goal of the events is to raise awareness about food waste and help people in need.  A recent dumpster dinner in San Francisco, for instance, cost  $125  to attend ― but a quarter of the profits went to nonprofit  Food Runners . The group picks up surplus food from companies and redistributes it to feed the hungry.  Trust us, the recipes will make your mouth water, not gag. Past menu items have included gazpacho made from overripe tomatoes  and bruised beet tartare served on a bed of rescued radish. Since its launch in 2014 in New York City , the event has spread, arriving in Berkeley last year and reaching San Francisco this summer . “The idea behind this multi-course, veg-forward tasting menu is for eaters to see the incredible potential many of us fail to see ...
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The Psychology Behind Why People Don't Recycle 3.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The benefits of recycling  seem straightforward. The practice reduces waste sent to landfills, conserves natural resources, reduces pollution and creates jobs. And the majority of Americans do recycle... sometimes. Far fewer, however, do it consistently. “Recycling is a behavior,” Brian Iacoviello, an assistant psychiatry professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City told The Huffington Post. “Much like exercising or eating healthily, people often engage in this behavior less than they ‘should.’” Indeed, according to a 2011 Ipsos Public Affairs survey, only half of adults recycle daily . Another third of respondents said they recycle less frequently than that, and a full 13 percent revealed that they never recycle. Because the reward for recycling (saving the earth) and the repercussions for infrequently recycling (damaging the environment) aren’t necessarily immediate, it can be hard for people to make the association between their daily habits and those habits’ ...
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Why This Father Feeds His Son Freakish Fruit And Vegetables 2.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Jordan Figueiredo’s son, Evan, hates salads. The 5-year-old, like many 5-year-olds, just can’t get into his greens. But if there’s one thing he can’t get enough of, it’s carrots with legs. Or peaches with noses. Basically, if it’s a fruit or vegetable that doesn’t look the way it’s “supposed” to, Evan is calling dibs. And the weirder it looks, the more he wants it. Evan gets this from his father. The elder Figueiredo works by day as a solid waste specialist for the Castro Valley Sanitation District, about a 40-minute drive outside of San Francisco, working to make sure municipal waste is properly dealt with. In his spare time, Figueiredo works practically around the clock as an anti- food waste activist. In addition to managing EndFoodWaste.org , a resource website, he also runs the popular Ugly Fruit and Veg social media accounts, which feature humorous photos of the unusually shaped fruits and vegetables that most grocery stores refuse to sell. The accounts boast over 70,000 followers on Twitter and ...
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These 4 States Are Doing Something Truly Revolutionary With Food 29.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The mind-boggling amount of food Americans throw away is the kind of problem that seems ripe for nationwide reform. But while federal legislation lingers in Congress , some states have found promising ways to keep edible items out of the trash. As much as 40 percent of the food produced in the U.S. never gets eaten , wasting resources and money, filling landfills and harming the environment. More urgently, there are millions of families who struggle to afford food, while there are mountains of it decaying in the trash. But these states are changing that, using strategies to keep food out of landfills and get it to hungry families. Their policies signal that officials are recognizing the economic, social and environmental benefits that come with making food waste reduction a priority. Here are a few of the states that are ahead of the curve on food waste, and what they’re doing about it.  1. Vermont  Vermont is putting its foot down on food in the garbage. In a few years, Vermont will allow exactly zero ...
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Climate Change This Week: A Hot New High, Kids Show the Way, and More! 27.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
OO Europe's Oil Imports 'Dependent On Unstable Countries' OO Power From "The New Coal", Natural Gas, Expected To Reach A Record High, Despite Climate Concerns - bad news, because besides the bad methane emissions from its production and distribution, burning it adds further emissions. OO US Coal Ash Crisis Builds - Coal production and use has plummeted, but the wastes left behind after burning it keep on coming, and they have been stored in lightly regulated, water-filled basins since at least the 1950s. OO China Pledged To Curb Coal Plants. Greenpeace Says It's Still Adding Them. The construction boom would result in about 400 gigawatts of excess capacity and waste more than $150 billion on building unneeded plants, said the new a report. But ... OO Record Growth In Chinese Renewable Energy Markets OO Coal India Accused Of Bulldozing Human Rights Amid Production Boom says Amnesty International report. <> OO Fossil Fuel Industry Risks Losing $33 Trillion in revenue in the next 25 years due to global ...
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NYC's Big Businesses Now Have To Compost Food Waste 22.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New York City is cracking down on food waste. Starting Tuesday, big businesses that generate a lot of food waste ― including hotels, stadiums, food manufacturers and wholesalers ― will have to separate out their organic waste for composting or other approved processing, according to new city rules. Companies can compost the waste themselves or hire carting services to collect any leftover food , food-soiled paper or yard waste, and transport it to a facility. “The message has gone out that New York City is going to treat its food scraps sustainably,” Eric Goldstein of the Natural Resources Defense Council told Mic.com . “[This will] get them out of landfills and into composting.” Food waste is a major problem in the United States. Up to 40 percent of food in the U.S. goes uneaten, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. Some of the food is composted, but most of it winds up in landfills. In New York City, organic waste alone makes up around one-third of all waste generated by businesses, ...
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How To Tell If You Can Recycle Something, In One Chart 21.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Between the multicolored bins, complex facilities and sticky bottles, recycling can seem very intimidating. But it only takes the tiniest bit of extra effort and research to keep everyday throwaway items from being lost in a landfill forever. That’s why we’ve created a primer that will teach you every basic recycling rule you will ever need to know. Follow these six rules of recycling below and you’ll have your own green routine in no time.  1. Every area has different recycling procedures. Know what yours are. Recycling procedures vary from city to city and state to state , and can determine everything from what you can recycle (plastic, paper, etc.), to how to separate various materials (plastics vs. glass), to where you leave your recycling bins (curbside, drop-off centers, etc.). To make sure you follow the proper procedures, learn about your area’s recycling program by visiting your local municipality’s website  or by  finding a recycling location near you . 2. Pay attention to all of those ...
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The U.S. Wastes Half Of All Produce Because It's Not Instagram-Worthy 14.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
America is so obsessed with beauty that we waste an unconscionable amount of perfectly edible produce just because it doesn’t meet our superficial standards. A new study from the Guardian found that half of all produce grown in the U.S. is discarded because it’s bruised, misshapen, discolored or has some other non-threatening deformity. “It’s all about blemish-free produce,” Jay Johnson, who ships fresh fruit and vegetables from North Carolina and central Florida, told the Guardian. “What happens in our business today is that it is either perfect, or it gets rejected. It is perfect to them, or they turn it down. And then you are stuck.”  Take Action Now Join thousands of Americans calling on Walmart to sell "ugly" fruit and vegetables to help reduce food waste. So, instead of wasting time and energy harvesting fruits and vegetable that supermarkets won’t accept, farmers feed the so-called “ugly” produce to livestock, leave it to rot in fields or transport it directly to the landfill. It’s a concerning ...
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Sacramento Group Rescues 40,000 Tons Of Food Waste, Turns It Into Fuel 12.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In Sacramento, farm-to-table is a nice start, but it doesn’t stop there. Once the food’s consumed, it’s then turned into fuel. Created through a public-private partnership with the University of California, Davis and the Energy Commission, the Sacramento Biodigester is keeping leftovers out of landfills and converting them into fuel that can power school buses, waste disposal trucks and fleet vehicles, according to the California Energy Commission.  Altogether, it diverts 40,000 tons of food waste from landfills, according to Energy Vision. It’s a pretty sizable operation considering that organic waste makes up about 30 percent of what’s dumped into landfills, according to CleanWorld, one of two companies that helped open the Biodigester.  “ Farm to Fork to Fuel to Farm is an effort to turn what would otherwise be a waste stream – which is food waste – into a regional resource,” Tim Taylor, of the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, told Yale Climate Connections.  Take Action ...
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Ontario Passes New Waste-Free Ontario Act 12.7.2016 ENN Network News - ENN
Province Brings in Legislation to Increase Recycling, Create Jobs, Fight Climate Change
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