User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Dec 19 2014 07:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Taking the Green Approach: Four Ways to Reuse Your Old Mattress 19.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Once you've purchased a new mattress, you probably don't want to think about your old bed. However, most people don't realize where their mattresses go after they get rid of them. Mattresses are known to be highly recyclable , but unfortunately many simply throw away their used mattress once they've bought a new one. A mattress takes up precious landfill space and aren't easily compacted like typical trash. So instead of letting your mattress rot away in a trash pile, look to one of these alternatives to let your mattress shine brightly in a new life. Prepare Your Mattress For Its Next Life Before you take any steps to get rid of your mattress, you should take time to clean it first. Start out by vacuuming the top of your bed with your upholstery attachment. This will get rid of most of the dust and dust mites and freshen up your mattress. According to Lifehacker , you can also sift baking soda over mattress to freshen it up for whoever will get your mattress next. A few drops of essential oil in the ...
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Are You Made of Air Pollution? 17.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
How would you like to be made of air pollution? Believe it or not, much of your body actually is. If you could imagine nine out of ten of your atoms suddenly losing their color, the remaining tenth would leave a ghostly translucent form of you behind, as though you were sculpted from smoked glass. That's what you would see if you could envision the eight hundred trillion trillion atoms of carbon that are now embedded in your body. Incredibly, about one in eight of those carbon atoms emerged recently from smokestacks and exhaust pipes. By the end of this century, rising carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of coal, oil, and natural gas will lodge even more fossil carbon in the bodies of your descendants. This is because plants harvest carbon dioxide from the air, and when we dump fossil fuel carbon into the atmosphere much of it runs through the world's food chains and into our bodies. If we continue to burn fossil fuels at current rates until the remaining deposits run out, then people of the next ...
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The True Cost of Turning on the Lights 15.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Turning on the lights as we walk into a dark room might be one of the most automatic acts of living in the modern industrial / post-industrial world. If we thought about the process and consequence of each act of our daily lives, we would not get out the door, much less read a book at night. Though one can't possibly understand any of the myriad miracles of daily life, blind acceptance makes us heedless consumers, and everything does have a consequence, especially turning on a light. Coal-fired electrical generation plant with waste ash ponds in background Moncks Corner, SC When making a case for something, the tendency is to cite facts and numbers, which are big, but hard to grasp. Coal plants are in operation all around the country, burn a staggering amount of coal, and release some of the most toxic stuff known, so poisonous that there is no amount safe for the human body: dioxins, furans, mercury, arsenic, chromium, and lead. Some perspectives: burning coal releases the largest amount of uranium, and ...
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Cultivating Climate Justice Through Compost: The Story of Hernani 14.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
(Image: Compost pile via Shutterstock) When the people of Hernani, Spain, began a residential compost system, they weren’t looking to become heroes of the movement for climate justice. Like thousands of other towns around the world, they were simply looking for an alternative to incineration and the pollution it brings. Hernani is located in Basque country, in the province of Gipuzkoa. In 2002, the Gipuzkoa landfill was nearly full, and the provincial government proposed building two new incinerators to burn the trash. The citizens of Hernani and other municipalities of the province immediately joined together in opposition . In a particularly impressive action, hundreds took the streets for what they called a “zero waste flash mob dance.” Not only did Hernani fight the incinerator plans (and very creatively), they also began implementing zero waste strategies that would help eliminate the need to burn or bury waste at all. Within a few years, Hernani became a center of composting excellence. To start, ...
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Plan ahead to reduce food waste during the holidays 10.12.2014 TreeHugger
If shoppers, cooks, and eaters all contributed a bit more forethought and planning to the contents of their kitchens, much of the 35 million tons of food wasted annually by Americans could be diverted from landfills to human nourishment.
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Michigan May Redefine Fuel From Burning Tires As Renewable Energy 10.12.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A Michigan bill aims to classify fuel made by burning tires and hazardous industrial waste as renewable energy, but environmentalists say that's setting a dangerous precedent. Under the state's Clean, Renewable and Efficient Energy Act of 2008, Michigan utility companies are required to derive 10 percent of their energy from sources like wind and solar power by 2015; the new House Bill 5205 would make it easier for them to hit the target by expanding the definition of renewable energy to include types of solid waste. Introduced by Rep. Aric Nesbitt (R-Lawton), the new bill passed 63-46 last week with support from several Democrats and has been sent to the state Senate. Nesbitt said the legislation would be an economic and environmental boon for the state, because converting previously non-recyclable materials into energy through advanced processes with stringent regulations would reduce landfill waste. "I think this provides Michigan a stepping stone to being a leader in both clean energy and landfill ...
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Cultivating Climate Justice: A Tale of Two Cities 4.12.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Watch Live As Scientists Debate The Benefits And Drawbacks Of GMOs With A Monsanto Executive 4.12.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Tune in live at 6:45 p.m. ET on Wednesday, December 3 for a spirited debate on the risks and rewards of biotechnology and genetically-modified organisms, commonly known as GMOs. The debate, hosted by Intelligence Squared U.S. in New York City, will feature two experts arguing in support of GMOs and two against. Participants will "debate the risks and rewards of genetically modified food in terms of our safety, their impact on the environment, and whether they can help improve food security around the globe," according to the organization. Monsanto Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Dr. Robert Fraley will argue in favor of biotech, alongside Alison Van Eenennaam, a genomics and biotechnology research at University of California Davis. Charles Benbrook, a research professor at Washington State University's Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, and Margaret Mellon, a science policy consultant with the Union of Concerned Scientists, will take the other side. Since their ...
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Cultivating Climate Justice: A Tale of Two Cities 3.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This is part 3 of a four-part article series "Cultivating Climate Justice" which tells the stories of community groups on the frontlines of the pollution, waste and climate crises, working together for systems change. United across six continents, these grassroots groups are defending community rights to clean air, clean water, zero waste, environmental justice, and good jobs. They are all members of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, a network of over 800 organizations from 90+ countries. This series is produced by the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and Other Worlds. Cultivating Climate Justice: A Tale of Two Cities This is a tale of two U.S. cities building solutions to the climate crisis from the bottom up. We start in the Northeast of the country, with Cooperative Energy, Recycling and Organics (CERO) , a newly formed worker-owned cooperative in Boston, Massachusetts. While providing family-supporting jobs for the community, CERO works with businesses on separating ...
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Bhopal Disaster Haunts Survivors 30 Years Later 3.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BHOPAL, India (AP) — Three decades after lethal gas swept through Bhopal, the central Indian city remains haunted by memories of the world's worst industrial disaster. Hundreds of survivors of the gas leak that claimed thousands of lives took to the streets Wednesday to mark the 30th anniversary of the disaster, chanting slogans and carrying placards demanding harsher punishments for those responsible and more compensation for the victims. On the morning of Dec. 3, 1984, a pesticide plant run by Union Carbide leaked about 40 tons of deadly methyl isocyanate gas into the air in Bhopal, quickly killing about 4,000 people. Lingering effects of the poison pushed the death toll to about 15,000 over the next few years, according to Indian government estimates. In all, at least 500,000 people were affected, the government says. Thirty years later, activists say thousands of children are still being born with brain damage, missing palates and twisted limbs because of their parents' exposure to the gas or water ...
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Jiff The Pomeranian As Elvis Presley Is A Hunk Of Burning Cuteness 2.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Like the King once sang, Jiff, we "can't help falling in love with you." Watch Jiff the Pomeranian channel Elvis Presley in this two-legged poolside strut to "Burning Love." A video posted by jiff (@jiffpom) on Nov 11, 2014 at 12:26pm PST Additional props to Jiff -- a professional charmer who holds the world record for walking on two paws -- for an outfit that is strikingly similar to the one Elvis wore in this video performance of the song: You certainly ain't a hounddog, ...
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Cultivating Climate Justice From the Front Lines of the Crisis 29.11.2014 Truthout - All Articles
This is part 2 of a four-part article series "Cultivating Climate Justice" which tells the stories of community groups on the frontlines of the pollution, waste and climate crises, working together for systems change. United across six continents, these grassroots groups are defending community rights to clean air, clean water, zero waste, environmental justice, and good jobs. They are all members of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, a network of over 800 organizations from 90+ countries. This series is produced by the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and Other Worlds   "To anyone who continues to deny the reality that is climate change.... I dare you to go to the islands of the Pacific, the islands of the Caribbean and the islands of the Indian Ocean and see the impacts of rising sea levels; to the mountainous regions of the Himalayas and the Andes to see communities confronting glacial floods, to the Arctic where communities grapple with the fast dwindling polar ice ...
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Cultivating Climate Justice From the Frontlines of the Crisis 29.11.2014 Truthout - All Articles
This is part 2 of a four-part article series "Cultivating Climate Justice" which tells the stories of community groups on the frontlines of the pollution, waste and climate crises, working together for systems change. United across six continents, these grassroots groups are defending community rights to clean air, clean water, zero waste, environmental justice, and good jobs. They are all members of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, a network of over 800 organizations from 90+ countries. This series is produced by the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and Other Worlds   "To anyone who continues to deny the reality that is climate change.... I dare you to go to the islands of the Pacific, the islands of the Caribbean and the islands of the Indian Ocean and see the impacts of rising sea levels; to the mountainous regions of the Himalayas and the Andes to see communities confronting glacial floods, to the Arctic where communities grapple with the fast dwindling polar ice ...
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The Quadrofoil Hopes To Be The Boat Of The Future 29.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If Teslas are the cars of the future , the Quadrofoil hopes to be the boat of the future. The electric personal watercraft looks like something James Bond would drive over Lake Como in a high-speed chase . Sleek and futuristic looking, the watercraft uses hydrofoil technology to “fly” above the surface of the water, making it virtually emission-free. Hydrofoil technology is not new , but according to Quadrofoil's president and CEO, Marjan Rožman, "What is new on Quadrofoil are electric drive and patented steering technology that enable stability and agility at the same time." As the boat reaches a speed of 6 knots (about 7 mph), its hydrofoil wings create lift and raise the boat out of the water, which, Rožman told The Huffington Post, enables it to be driven through most environmentally protected sanctuaries. Its nearly silent, all-electric motor also means there's no oil or exhaust to muck up the marine ecosystem. The design's hollow hull and composite, lightweight construction also makes the vessel ...
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Nine Ways to a Food Waste-Free Thanksgiving 25.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Thanksgiving is a good time to remember to be grateful for farmers, farm laborers, cooks, and food service workers. Unfortunately, while we are giving thanks for the harvest, we are also wasting massive amounts of food. Between Thanksgiving and the New Year, the United States will waste about five million tons of food. In one year, Americans alone waste about 34 million tons. That's a lot of turkey, pie, and Christmas cookies ending up in the trash--instead of in our stomachs. According to author and food waste expert Jonathan Bloom, food waste is not just a moral issue, but also an environmental issue. "A tremendous amount of resources go into growing our food, processing, shipping, cooling and cooking it," said Bloom. "Our food waste could represent as much as six percent of U.S. energy consumption." "Landfills are the second largest human-related source of methane. Food is the second largest component of landfills. In a sense we're aiding global warming when we throw food in the garbage," explains ...
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This holiday season, try to focus less on physical gifts and more on experiential ones 24.11.2014 TreeHugger
Giving physical gifts just for the sake of giving loses its noble purpose when it results in an overstuffed house and more trash in our landfill sites.
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Cultivating Climate Justice from the Front Lines of the Crisis: The Philippines and Australia 24.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This is part 2 of a four-part article series "Cultivating Climate Justice" which tells the stories of community groups on the frontlines of the pollution, waste and climate crises, working together for systems change. United across six continents, these grassroots groups are defending community rights to clean air, clean water, zero waste, environmental justice, and good jobs. They are all members of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, a network of over 800 organizations from 90+ countries. This series is produced by the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and Other Worlds. Cultivating Climate Justice from the Frontlines of the Crisis: The Philippines and Australia "To anyone who continues to deny the reality that is climate change.... I dare you to go to the islands of the Pacific, the islands of the Caribbean and the islands of the Indian Ocean and see the impacts of rising sea levels; to the mountainous regions of the Himalayas and the Andes to see communities confronting ...
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This UK bus is powered by food waste and poop 22.11.2014 TreeHugger
The future of sustainable public transport could come through fueling buses with gas made from two of the things that we seem to have a lot of, human waste and food waste.
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A Poetic Exploration Of The Hunting Tradition In America's North 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photographer Clare Benson comes from a long line of hunters. Growing up in northern Michigan, she remembers her father, now 82 years old, winning archery championships and reminiscing about his time as a hunting guide in the Alaskan wilderness. For her, the tradition of hunting -- and the rugged northern landscape that serves as its backdrop -- represents themes of memory and mortality, ones she's managed to weave in and out of her work for some time. Her series "The Shepard's Daughter" addresses her connection to hunting most directly. The images show Benson, her sister and her father trekking through snow-covered scenes, respectfully carrying the spoils of hunting trips past. She pointedly juxtaposes portraits of her family members lounging in contemplation with photographs of the animals they hunt, skin, cook and eat. Set in a vast world unfamiliar to most urban dwellers, Benson paints a picture of a hunting tradition we don't often encounter. The Shepherd's Daughter, 2012 The project, she explained ...
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Harvard Students File Lawsuit To Push University To Divest From Fossil Fuels 20.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BOSTON (AP) — Seven Harvard University students have filed a lawsuit asking a judge to force the university's governing body to divest from fossil fuel companies. The lawsuit filed Wednesday alleges investment in those companies violates the university's duties as a public charity. The complaint asks the court to compel the Harvard Corporation, the governing body, to stop investing any of its $36.4 billion endowment in gas, coal and oil companies. Harvard students have pressed the university to divest from fossil fuels as a way to slow climate change. "Climate change is now causing harm through mortality, economic damage and political instability," said Benjamin Franta, one of the students who filed the lawsuit. "The Harvard Corporation has a moral and legal duty to avoid investing in activities that cause such grave harms to its students and the public." Spokesman Jeff Neal said university leaders agree that climate change must be confronted but "differ on the means" to do that. Neal says Harvard ...
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