User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Jul 22 2016 04:17 IST RSS 2.0
 
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NYC's Big Businesses Now Have To Compost Food Waste 22.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New York City is cracking down on food waste. Starting Tuesday, big businesses that generate a lot of food waste ― including hotels, stadiums, food manufacturers and wholesalers ― will have to separate out their organic waste for composting or other approved processing, according to new city rules. Companies can compost the waste themselves or hire carting services to collect any leftover food , food-soiled paper or yard waste, and transport it to a facility. “The message has gone out that New York City is going to treat its food scraps sustainably,” Eric Goldstein of the Natural Resources Defense Council told Mic.com . “[This will] get them out of landfills and into composting.” Food waste is a major problem in the United States. Up to 40 percent of food in the U.S. goes uneaten, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. Some of the food is composted, but most of it winds up in landfills. In New York City, organic waste alone makes up around one-third of all waste generated by businesses, ...
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How To Tell If You Can Recycle Something, In One Chart 21.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Between the multicolored bins, complex facilities and sticky bottles, recycling can seem very intimidating. But it only takes the tiniest bit of extra effort and research to keep everyday throwaway items from being lost in a landfill forever. That’s why we’ve created a primer that will teach you every basic recycling rule you will ever need to know. Follow these six rules of recycling below and you’ll have your own green routine in no time.  1. Every area has different recycling procedures. Know what yours are. Recycling procedures vary from city to city and state to state , and can determine everything from what you can recycle (plastic, paper, etc.), to how to separate various materials (plastics vs. glass), to where you leave your recycling bins (curbside, drop-off centers, etc.). To make sure you follow the proper procedures, learn about your area’s recycling program by visiting your local municipality’s website  or by  finding a recycling location near you . 2. Pay attention to all of those ...
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The U.S. Wastes Half Of All Produce Because It's Not Instagram-Worthy 14.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
America is so obsessed with beauty that we waste an unconscionable amount of perfectly edible produce just because it doesn’t meet our superficial standards. A new study from the Guardian found that half of all produce grown in the U.S. is discarded because it’s bruised, misshapen, discolored or has some other non-threatening deformity. “It’s all about blemish-free produce,” Jay Johnson, who ships fresh fruit and vegetables from North Carolina and central Florida, told the Guardian. “What happens in our business today is that it is either perfect, or it gets rejected. It is perfect to them, or they turn it down. And then you are stuck.”  Take Action Now Join thousands of Americans calling on Walmart to sell "ugly" fruit and vegetables to help reduce food waste. So, instead of wasting time and energy harvesting fruits and vegetable that supermarkets won’t accept, farmers feed the so-called “ugly” produce to livestock, leave it to rot in fields or transport it directly to the landfill. It’s a concerning ...
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Sacramento Group Rescues 40,000 Tons Of Food Waste, Turns It Into Fuel 12.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In Sacramento, farm-to-table is a nice start, but it doesn’t stop there. Once the food’s consumed, it’s then turned into fuel. Created through a public-private partnership with the University of California, Davis and the Energy Commission, the Sacramento Biodigester is keeping leftovers out of landfills and converting them into fuel that can power school buses, waste disposal trucks and fleet vehicles, according to the California Energy Commission.  Altogether, it diverts 40,000 tons of food waste from landfills, according to Energy Vision. It’s a pretty sizable operation considering that organic waste makes up about 30 percent of what’s dumped into landfills, according to CleanWorld, one of two companies that helped open the Biodigester.  “ Farm to Fork to Fuel to Farm is an effort to turn what would otherwise be a waste stream – which is food waste – into a regional resource,” Tim Taylor, of the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, told Yale Climate Connections.  Take Action ...
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Ontario Passes New Waste-Free Ontario Act 12.7.2016 ENN Network News - ENN
Province Brings in Legislation to Increase Recycling, Create Jobs, Fight Climate Change
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New York Challenged Businesses To Cut Their Waste In Half -- It Actually Worked 11.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New Yorkers just got one more thing to brag about. Over the course of five months, more than 30 major businesses in New York City managed to cut in half the amount of trash they churn out ― making the huge, humming metropolis a little less wasteful.  Businesses participating in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s “Zero Waste Challenge” have diverted over 35,000 tons of garbage away from landfills and trash incinerators since February, according to a release from the mayor’s office on Monday. Most of that trash was composted, and more than 300 tons of food waste were donated to people in need. The city still has a long way to go toward eliminating waste altogether. It produces 33 million tons of waste each year, much of which is disposed of in neighboring states. Nearly a third of the trash in these landfills is food waste.  De Blasio announced the challenge earlier this year, calling on 31 businesses in New York ― including Whole Foods, Viacom and Anheuser-Busch ― to cut their waste by 50 percent by June. The ...
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French Police Fire Tear Gas Near Euro Cup Final Fan Zone In Paris 11.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Clashes erupted between police and belligerent fans in Paris on Sunday as people tried to break into a closed-off viewing area to see the Euro 2016 soccer final.  Officers fired tear gas and charged at dozens of people trying to break into the area, near the Eiffel Tower, sparking chaotic scenes in the French capital.  Around 90,000 fans watched the match in the specially designated zone that featured an enormous 4,500-square-foot screen showing France and Portugal face off in the final of the soccer tournament. Some supporters weren’t able to get into the zone before it reached capacity, however, and small groups of people repeatedly tried to break into the area, Reuters reported . Riot police tried to disperse the crowds outside the zone throughout the match, at one point using water cannons to try to turn them back. Video posted on social media showed people hurling projectiles at a line of shielded riot police before the officers charged forward. — Remy Buisine (@RemyBuisine) July 10, 2016 Paris had ...
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Why This Congresswoman Thinks Kids Will Lead The Food Waste Revolution 8.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
For the congresswoman leading  the fight for better laws around food waste , using up leftovers was just a way of life. “I come from New England, home of Yankee thrift,” Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-Maine) told The Huffington Post. “Wasting food wasn’t even a concept. But I realized, once I grew up, that this wasn’t the case for most Americans.” In December, Pingree introduced the Food Recovery Act and the Food Date Labeling Act in the House ― the first-ever  congressional bills on the issue. The legislation takes an expansive view of food waste , with provisions on everything from farm waste to imperfect produce to more extensive USDA research. Pingree gave HuffPost an inside look at her campaign during a phone interview that touched on how food waste intersects with cultural values, climate change and education. Take Action Now Sign the petition at Change.org How did you first become interested in food waste as a target of legislation? It first came to my attention at The New York Times’ Food for Tomorrow ...
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GOP Senator Skipping Convention 'To Watch Some Dumpster Fires' 8.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Between the  party infighting , fundraising issues  and a presumptive nominee with a history of inciting both violence and vigorous opposition , the Republican National Convention is set to be a giant flaming pile of trash.  It’s so bad that one Republican lawmaker said he’s decided to spend his summer viewing dumpster fires rather than gather with the GOP in Cleveland. Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse “will not be attending the convention and will instead take his kids to watch some dumpster fires across the state, all of which enjoy more popularity than the current front-runners,” his spokesman  told the Hill . Sasse has  long voiced his opposition to Donald Trump and he’s used that flaming garbage line before. In May, he wrote on Facebook that “there are dumpster fires in my town more popular than” Trump or Hillary Clinton. And he tweeted this after Trump’s Thursday visit with Capitol Hill lawmakers: You're welcome. — Ben Sasse (@BenSasse) July 7, 2016 Back in February, Sasse promised to vote for a third party ...
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Trash by the numbers: Startling statistics about US garbage 2.7.2016 TreeHugger
Americans do everything with gusto, including generating waste.
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The EPA Could Have Protected These People From Breathing Coal Dust Every Day. So Why Didn't It? 30.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
BOKOSHE, Oklahoma — Here in the land of wind-whipped, rolling plains, the gray dust, which sparkles in just the right light, seems inescapable. Residents of this town near the Arkansas line say they have spotted it on their grass, trees, ponds, barns, furniture and cars. The source of Bokoshe’s enduring misery is coal ash, an often-toxic byproduct of burning coal for electricity. Clouds of it, swirling like tornadoes at times, descend upon people while they sit in their yards and mow their lawns. The powdery material clogs swimming pools, air conditioners and chicken coops. The ash, which contains harmful metals such as arsenic, chromium and lead, comes from a state-permitted disposal pit — operated by a company named Making Money Having Fun — fed by a power plant eight miles outside of town. Residents here began complaining about the dust to state regulators in 1998. More than a decade later, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency got involved and in 2014 finally acknowledged that the pit has shown ...
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Food Crusader Battling Walmart Could Emerge Victorious — With Your Help 29.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Walmart is the white whale to Jordan Figueiredo's Captain Ahab -- at once the elusive target and the mammoth opponent of the 37-year-old food activist’s obsessive, years-long crusade. The California-based municipal recycling expert just wants the world’s biggest retailer to start selling misshapen, dinged-up fruits and vegetables. “In terms of sustainability, social benefits and even from a PR standpoint for grocers, it’s low-hanging fruit, literally,” said Figueiredo. “Walmart has so many stores -- if they start selling ugly fruits and vegetables, everyone can.” Figueiredo spends more than 25 hours a week outside his day job for the Castro Valley, California, city government working on his fruit and vegetable campaign. For much of the last decade, he has campaigned to reduce the roughly 40 percent of food that each year goes uneaten, most of which ends up in landfills, where it rots and emits planet-warming methane into the atmosphere. That’s an appalling statistic when you consider that one in seven ...
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Walmart Refuses To Sell 'Ugly' Fruits And Vegetables. That Needs To Change. 29.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Walmart is the white whale to Jordan Figueiredo's Captain Ahab -- at once the elusive target and the mammoth opponent of the 37-year-old food activist’s obsessive, years-long crusade. The California-based municipal recycling expert just wants the world’s biggest retailer to start selling misshapen, dinged-up fruits and vegetables. “In terms of sustainability, social benefits and even from a PR standpoint for grocers, it’s low-hanging fruit, literally,” said Figueiredo. “Walmart has so many stores -- if they start selling ugly fruits and vegetables, everyone can.” Figueiredo spends more than 25 hours a week outside his day job for the Castro Valley, California, city government working on his fruit and vegetable campaign. For much of the last decade, he has campaigned to reduce the roughly 40 percent of food that each year goes uneaten, most of which ends up in landfills, where it rots and emits planet-warming methane into the atmosphere. That’s an appalling statistic when you consider that one in seven ...
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What Brexit might mean for climate, energy, pollution and yes, light bulbs 28.6.2016 TreeHugger
It's the Telegraph newspaper trying to convince people to vote leave, but it is indicative.
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Small-town mayor tells Toronto to keeps its own trash 28.6.2016 TreeHugger
The city doesn't like to deal with its own trash, preferring to outsource the dirty work to smaller communities, but now the community of Ingersoll is fighting back fiercely.
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This Walmart Worker Threw Away Food On The Job, Then Went Home Hungry 28.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When David Alvarez worked at a Walmart in Tampa, Florida, he regularly chucked unsold tomatoes, potatoes and bananas into compost bins behind the store. Meanwhile, the food on his own table was much less fulfilling -- sandwiches, ramen noodles, milk. It was all he could afford, he said. Alvarez felt like he was "starving to death,” he told The Huffington Post. “I’d been on food stamps the whole time I’d been out there at Walmart, because you just cannot make it on what they pay.” For most of his time as a “produce associate,” Alvarez, 56, made $9.15 an hour -- about a buck more than the Florida minimum wage , but not enough to eat well, he noted. Alvarez was fired in March, he said, for speaking at a rally in support of a $15-an-hour minimum wage. Kevin Gardner, a Walmart spokesperson, told HuffPost that Alvarez was laid off for violating company policies, though he declined to specify which ones. But Alvarez’s time working for Walmart revealed a disappointing truth: Stores regularly toss food that is ...
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Committing to recycling the “non-recyclable” 27.6.2016 TreeHugger
Companies and manufacturers are creating custom solutions for their difficult-to-recycle waste
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Where Did 'Dumpster Fire' Come From? Where Is It Rolling? 24.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In 2009, sportswriter Mike Wise had just started a radio show at 106.7 The Fan , a Washington D.C.-area sports station. Wise, now a senior writer at The Undefeated, noticed that one of his work buddies, a traffic reporter at the station named Liz Drabick , had an evocative pet phrase. "Whenever someone was having a really bad day, or someone was completely out of sorts, she'd just go, 'Oh man, guy's a dumpster fire.' Or she'd go, 'Oh, that whole organization is a dumpster fire,'" Wise recalled in a phone conversation recently. "And I was like, Hey, that's pretty good." That very year, he used it in a column about the Washington football team, writing, "[I]f Jim Zorn has to answer one more question about his job security, it's time to also hold the coach's players and his superiors accountable for this dumpster fire -- this abomination of a loss." Wise was hardly the first to commit a metaphorical "dumpster fire" to print, but 2009 was a different time. His smidgen of hesitation as to whether his readers ...
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Sustainability Is More Than Recycling 23.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A dozen years ago sustainability was an uncommon word, and was used occasionally to describe anything that would maintain over time. Then the term gained new meaning as increasingly scientific studies were published with data relating to climate change and its impact on our planet. Former Vice-President Al Gore was one of the first who took those data and tried to make them understandable to the common citizen, which was much needed because scientists tend to communicate in their own jargon, and mainly to their colleagues. The problem with this situation is that when the information that the scientists are holding has a serious impact on how we live, eat, produce, travel, shop, or entertain, we, the public, should have access to it and understand it. Journalists can play an important role here in growing the understanding of their public audiences, since when interviewing experts in the area, journalists can persuade the scientists to translate their knowledge into examples or analogies that a ...
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Following Truthout Investigations, Senate Seeks Alternatives to Burning Military Waste in Open Air 21.6.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Senate recently approved an amendment to the omnibus defense-spending bill designed to pressure the military to move away from openly burning and detonating stockpiles of leftover munitions and other explosive and hazardous wastes at open-air facilities. If approved, a congressional study on alternatives would be a crucial step toward ending the open burning of military waste stockpiles. (Photo: Pixabay ) The Senate recently approved an amendment to the omnibus defense-spending bill designed to pressure the military to move away from openly burning and detonating stockpiles of leftover munitions and other explosive and hazardous wastes at open-air facilities. An amendment to the Senate's version of the National Defense Authorization Act would require the National Academy of Sciences to review the military's massive stockpile of demilitarized munitions and study available and emerging technology that could replace the practice of "open burning, open detonation" for disposing of hazardous and explosive ...
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