User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Dec 02 2016 09:33 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Kolkata Wins C40 Award For Best Solid Waste Project Of 2016 2.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Kolkata was honoured today at an awards ceremony in Mexico City. The C40 Cities Awards recognize the world's most inspiring and innovative cities tackling climate change. Sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies and BYD, the C40 Cities Awards ceremony was held during the C40 Mayors Summit, where more than 40 mayors from around the world gathered to create sustainable and liveable cities for citizens. "On behalf of C40, I want to congratulate all the winning cities for their commitment to their citizens and their dedication to tackling climate change," said outgoing C40 Chair and Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes. "Throughout my tenure as C40 Chair, I have been increasingly impressed by the calibre of the C40 Cities Award winners, and I look forward to seeing other mayors around the world adapting and implementing these models in their own cities." "The C40 Cities Awards recognize the best and boldest work being done by mayors to fight climate change and protect people from risks," said C40 President of the ...
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How to Reduce Spending and Your Eco-Footprint This Christmas 1.12.2016 Planet Ark News
With Australians spending over $1,000 at Christmas, some forward planning for meals and presents can lead to big savings for your wallet and eco-footprint.
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How to love a weird and perfect wilderness 28.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A desolate Oregon landscape offers lessons on the modern wild.
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TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky makes garbage the hero 18.11.2016 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Here's how one creative startup made the business case for recycling common trash such as paint, gum and cigarettes into everyday commodities.
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21 Reasons Why Plastic Bottles Ruin Everything: Recycling Won't Fix It, Zero Waste Will. 18.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Drinking from plastic bottles has become such an everyday way of life that many people don't even think about what they are made from, or where they really go after we're done with them. Each American throws out an average of 21 lbs (9.5kg) of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic bottles per year - 200 to 500 bottles per person.[1] That's quite a bit of plastic waste, just to have a drink. We are regularly reminded to recycle, and often hear about how much waste plastic is floating in the ocean . But that's all after these bottles have been created. What about the tsunami of environmental impact involved in manufacturing all this plastic before we even throw them away? Einstein once said, "Intellectuals solve problems, geniuses prevent them." So let's trace the life of a disposable plastic bottle to see why prevention of disposable plastic (not using it in the first place) is the real key to fighting pollution. #1 The key ingredient used to make plastic bottles is crude oil Manufacturing a quart ...
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16 more tips for living without plastic 17.11.2016 TreeHugger
Plastic-free living requires careful and conscientious consumer choices. Here are more ideas to help you along the journey.
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This new gadget promises to transform food scraps into fertilizer in 24 hours 16.11.2016 TreeHugger
The Zera Food Recycler, from Whirlpool Corporation's innovation incubator, WLabs, is a residential "composting" appliance for kitchen scraps.
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Think Outside the Bin 16.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's becoming second nature to throw food scraps in the compost and empty boxes into the recycle bin. But what about unwanted clothing? There's a responsible place for these items too, and it's not your garbage can. When we consider our waste stream, it's clear there are barriers preventing people from properly disposing of unwanted clothing, turning our landfills into laundry piles. Not everyone is aware that clothing and textiles can be reused or recycled, or how to donate these items to keep them out of landfills. This America Recycles Day , harness the power of reuse by thinking outside of your blue recycling bin and challenging yourself and others to make sure clothing doesn't end up in the trash. Spread the word Because clothing is such an essential part of our lives, it's easy to overlook the overwhelmingly negative impact it has on our environment. Consider this: manufacturing a single cotton T-shirt uses up to 700 gallons of water, and after it's tossed into a trash can and left in a landfill to ...
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The Future of Our Environment Depends on This Business Trend 14.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Image Credit Ever since the industrial revolution, we've been polluting our environment with wasteful byproducts. Once we realized how much damage was being caused, society has taken several huge strides towards mitigating this risk. We're researching and developing alternative sources of renewable energy. We're recycling our materials, and each member of our society is making changes to reduce their carbon footprint. More to be Done Unfortunately, it's not quite enough. There are still several severe issues that we haven't managed to solve. Plastics, for example, are major pollutants . They don't biodegrade. Instead of breaking down into tiny particles, they negatively impact the ecology of both land and sea. Worldwide, billions of tons of plastic are consumed worldwide, and most of this ends up in the environment. Sure, we can recycle some of this material, but not all of it can be saved. Most of the time, the typical recovery rate is around 60%. Why We Need Sustainable Packaging Since we haven't found ...
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The Closed Loop Fund, at age two, goes with the flow 14.11.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Can some of the world's largest brands foment a surge in recycling? All it takes is lots of money and grit. A status report.
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6 toothbrushes to keep your teeth clean and green 8.11.2016 TreeHugger
Reduce dental waste by supporting companies that prioritize compostability, recycling, and innovative materials.
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Photos: How to remove the traces of Burning Man 1.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
After the revelers leave, volunteers clean up every piece of trash they can find.
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Zero Waste Audit Results for 'Cartridges 4 Planet Ark' Program Partner 28.10.2016 Planet Ark News
The results of the annual audit of Close the Loop®, the Resource Recovery Partner for the 'Cartridges 4 Planet Ark' program, have just been finalised. And great news, the audit has issued Close the Loop with yet another Zero Waste to Landfill certificate for 2016.
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Canada celebrates 10 years making garbage great with TerraCycle 25.10.2016 TreeHugger
In Canada, we’ve collected over 150 million units of waste and engaged two million people to recycle.
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Rotterdam Implements Energy Transition and Climate Measures 25.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Part 3 of a series on Rotterdam's efforts to become a sustainable and "climate-proof" city. The city and port of Rotterdam. Rotterdam, the Netherlands--Can the city of Rotterdam cut its CO2 emissions in half by 2025? In order to succeed, the city will need to increase its production of renewable energy and expand its district heating network. The city is also striving to make its economy more energy efficient, and reduce vehicle emissions. District Heating Rotterdam's industries and incinerator generate enough waste heat for a million households. This city of 630,000 thus has substantial potential for district heating to share residual industrial heat with homes and businesses. A company known as the Heating Company of Rotterdam collects heat from industries in the port and shares it with homes and businesses. Use of waste heat eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels for heat and results in a significant reduction of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, thus improving local air ...
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The Worst Place on Earth: Death and Life in the Lost Town of Leer 20.10.2016 Truthout.com
Leer, South Sudan -- There it is again. That sickening smell. I'm standing on the threshold of a ghost of a home. Its footprint is all that's left. In the ruins sits a bulbous little silver teakettle -- metal, softly rounded, charred but otherwise perfect, save for two punctures. Something tore through it and ruined it, just as something tore through this home and ruined it, just as something tore through this town and left it a dusty, wasted ruin.  This, truth be told, is no longer a town, not even a razed one. It's a killing field, a place where human remains lie unburied, whose residents have long since fled, while its few remaining inhabitants are mostly refugees from similarly ravaged villages. The world is awash in killing fields, sites of slaughter where armed men have laid waste to the innocent, the defenseless, the unlucky; locales where women and children, old and young men have been suffocated, had their skulls shattered, been left gut-shot and gasping.  Or sometimes they're just the ...
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Half of plastic bottles used in Britain are never recycled 17.10.2016 TreeHugger
This amounts to a staggering 16 million plastic bottles daily, ending up in landfills or making their way to the ocean.
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Environmental Concerns -- and Anger -- Grow in Month After Thousand-Year Flood Strikes Louisiana 19.9.2016 Truthout - All Articles
In the aftermath of the 1000-year flood that hit southern Louisiana in August, environmental and public health concerns are mounting as the waters recede. Residents want to know why many areas that never flooded before were left in ruin this time, raising questions about the role water management played in potentially exacerbating the flood. The smell of mold lingers on streets where the contents from flooded homes and businesses are stacked in piles along the curbside, as well as in neighborhoods next to landfills where storm debris is taken. Polluted Floodwaters I met up with Frank Bonifay whose home and business are in the Spanish Lake Basin region, about 20 miles south of Baton Rouge.  We went to his home on Alligator Bayou Road, which for weeks after the flood was only accessible by boat.  Car in front of flooded home off Ridge Road in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, on September 2. ©2016 Julie Dermansky On our way we drove past the Honeywell Geismar chemical plant near Saint Gabriel, where workers ...
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These African Countries Don't Want Your Used Clothing Anymore 19.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This article is part of HuffPost’s “ Reclaim ” campaign, an ongoing project spotlighting the world’s waste crisis and how we can begin to solve it. Clearing your closet of last season’s gently worn clothes and donating them to an aid group probably makes you feel pretty good. After all, you may be helping someone in need and breathing life into items that might otherwise decompose in a landfill. But a number of countries in East Africa are fed up with the onslaught of secondhand items they receive from Western nonprofits and wholesalers, and want to ban such imports altogether. In 2014, a handful of East African countries imported more than $300 million worth of secondhand clothing from the United States and other wealthy countries. The used items have created a robust market in East Africa and thereby a decent amount of jobs. But experts say the vast amount of these imports have devastated local clothing industries and led the region to rely far too heavily on the West.  In March, the East African ...
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France leads the charge against single-use plastics 19.9.2016 TreeHugger
First came a ban on plastic bags, now there's a ban on disposable dishes and cutlery: How France is an impressive leader in the battle against plastic pollution.
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