User: flenvcenter Topic: Waste-Independent
Category: Disposal
Last updated: Aug 28 2015 24:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,397    
Welcome to Beautiful Parkersburg, West Virginia! 27.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Hold on to something,” Jim Tennant warned as he fired up his tractor. We lurched down a rutted dirt road past the old clapboard farmhouse where he grew up. Jim still calls it “the home place,” although its windows are now boarded up and the outhouse is crumbling into the field. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
Also found in: [+]
Groups File Notice of Intent to Sue EPA Over Dangerous Drilling and Fracking Waste 27.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
Thirty Miles From Selma, a Different Kind of Civil Rights Struggle 25.8.2015 Truthout.com
Also see: Environmental Racism Persists, and the EPA Is One Reason Why Uniontown, Alabama - As Esther Calhoun sees it, discrimination, rooted in the acts of many, has turned this wisp of a town into a dumping ground. A landfill owner that staked out roughly 1,000 acres for Alabama's biggest municipal-waste site on a county road dotted by well-worn homes. A county commission that approved the landfill over objections from a largely African-American neighborhood. And a state agency that issued operating permits time and again. "If this had been a rich, white neighborhood, the landfill would never have gotten here," said Calhoun, whose sharecropper and slave ancestors toiled on local plantations, explaining why so many of her fellow citizens view the facility as discriminatory. "They put it here because we're a poor, black community," she said. "They knew we couldn't fight back." In the last decade, little has roused this town in the heart of Alabama's "black belt," 30 miles west of Selma, like the ...
Also found in: [+]
10 ways to pack your kids a more sustainable lunch 21.8.2015 TreeHugger
The modern mantra of convenience has some pretty serious costs, and one the areas this trade-off can be found is tucked away in lunch boxes and backpacks.
Also found in: [+]
Scientists Find Solutions for Antidepressants, Antibiotics and Other Drugs in Our Water 19.8.2015 Truthout.com
There's no way around it, the headlines are disturbing. And they come, not from tabloids or click-bait blogs, but from papers published in scientific journals. They describe fish and birds responding with altered behavior and reproductive systems to antidepressants, diabetes medication, and other psychoactive or hormonally active drugs at concentrations found in the environment. They report on opiods, amphetamines and other pharmaceuticals found in treated drinking water; antibiotics in groundwater capable of altering naturally occurring bacterial communities; and over-the-counter and prescription drugs found in water leaching from municipal landfills. And these are just some of many recent studies examining the countless pharmaceuticals that are now being found just about everywhere scientists have looked for them in the environment. Exactly how many drugs are in use and how many may be detectable in the environment is difficult to pinpoint. But according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and ...
Also found in: [+]
Schools Receive Prizes Made From Recycled Cartridges 18.8.2015 Planet Ark News
We all know how important an inspiring school can be for your kids. As part of the 'Cartridges 4 Planet Ark' and Officeworks Schools Competition, we asked 'Why is it important for your school to recycle printer cartridges?' We have some inspiring responses.
Also found in: [+]
US EPA proposes regulations to reduce methane emissions from landfills 15.8.2015 Environmental News Network
As part of the Administration's Climate Action Plan – Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued two proposals to further reduce emissions of methane-rich gas from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Under today’s proposals, new, modified and existing landfills would begin collecting and controlling landfill gas at emission levels nearly a third lower than current requirements. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential more than 25 times that of carbon dioxide. Climate change threatens the health and welfare of current and future generations. Children, older adults, people with heart or lung disease and people living in poverty may be most at risk from the health impacts of climate change. In addition to methane, landfills also emit other pollutants, including the air toxics benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and vinyl ...
Also found in: [+]
Bagging Waste 10.8.2015 Planet Ark News
A small change to the packaging of tea bags helped Unilever eliminate 28 tonnes of waste heading to landfill.
Also found in: [+]
Bagging Waste 10.8.2015 Planet Ark News
A small change to the packaging of tea bags helped Unilever eliminate 28 tonnes of waste heading to landfill.
Also found in: [+]
From Billboards to Beach Gear: Turning Old Billboards Into Surfboard Bags, Backpacks and More 31.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I think we can all agree that it's great when a company can upcycle what would otherwise become landfill waste -- say, for instance, an old highway billboard -- into a useful product -- say, for instance, a weekender duffle. Turns out an old Gucci ad can live a happy second life as a surfboard bag, iPad mini sleeve or cardholder wallet. Rareform, a California-based company, found a way to use old billboards to create surfboard bags, totes, backpacks, hip pouches, wallets, SUP blade covers and more. To feel the bags, you'd be hard pressed to guess what they once were. To look at them, however, you instantly know they were once something else, from the bits of lettering, images, patches of color that aren't overtly "ad"-y, but may prompt double-takes or conversations. Rareform intercepts billboards before they reach the landfill. Each billboard is made of heavy-duty, water-proof, mildew-proof vinyl. I had no idea that billboards are made of vinyl, and if you didn't either, well, we're not alone. "I had no ...
Also found in: [+]
Rotting Trash Overwhelms Beirut As Summer Heat Rises 25.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Summer in the city can be rough. But we've never seen anything like Beirut, where a malodorous mix of political paralysis and festering garbage has residents in a rage. Beirutis are furious that their government failed to avoid a crisis ignited by the long-scheduled closure of a major landfill site last week. The government knew the date that the city dump would shut down -- July 17 -- but the authorities had no ready alternative when the day came. Garbage trucks have nowhere to take the trash, so they've stopped picking it up.  The piles of garbage rotting in the summer heat are triggering health warnings and protests. The Beirut Fire Department said that frustrated residents had  set fire to around 140 dumpsters and trash containers , further polluting the hot and humid air.  The mess is a stark reminder of the governmental crisis afflicting Lebanon, where politicians divided by local and regional conflicts can't even agree on where to dump the capital city's rubbish. The Cabinet voted Thursday to  ...
Also found in: [+]
John Oliver Is Horrified By How Much Food You Waste 20.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
  We throw out almost as much as we eat, wasting 40 percent of our food and $165 billion every year, John Oliver said on HBO's " Last Week Tonight " on Sunday.  That's enough to fill 730 football stadiums. "Food waste is like the band Rascall Flatts," Oliver said. "It can fill a surprising number of stadiums even though most people consider it complete garbage." We waste so much food that Oliver said, "in 40 years, when your order pizza from Domino's, they'll just deliver it straight to the nearest dumpster -- as they should, but that's not the point here."  All that wasted food doesn't go into stadiums, of course. It goes into dumps -- where, as it decays, it pumps out methane gas, a greenhouse gas that's 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat.   “When we dump food into a landfill, we’re essentially throwing a trash blanket over a flatulent food man and Dutch-ovening the entire planet," Oliver said. As Oliver points out, that food could've been used to feed the hungry instead of going ...
Also found in: [+]
Pushing Up 18.7.2015 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
Tightening the Screws on Fracking 18.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the most intractable problems of fracking is the threat its toxic, radioactive wastewater poses to our environment and our health. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's proposal to prevent municipal wastewater treatment plants from accepting this hazardous wastewater is one important step toward a solution. On its face, allowing facilities to treat wastewater laced with heavy metals, radioactive elements, and other dangerous toxic chemicals alongside dirty bath water is a terrible idea. These are plants designed to treat human waste and food scraps. They aren't equipped to deal with arsenic or benzene, which go untreated and are released into our rivers and lakes. Even more alarming, the chlorine used to disinfect water can mix with the bromides present in fracking's wastewater to form trihalomethanes , toxins linked to bladder cancer, miscarriages and still-births. Pennsylvania learned these lessons in 2011, when Carnegie Mellon University researchers detected abnormally high levels of ...
Also found in: [+]
After EPA Ignored Environmental Racism for Decades, Communities Fight Back 16.7.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Also found in: [+]
A Biodegradable Computer Chip That Performs Surprisingly Well 14.7.2015 Technology Review Feed - Tech Review Top Stories

Researchers show that devices based on a material derived from wood work as well as the communications chip in your smartphone.

Biodegradable, wood-based computer chips can perform just as well as chips commonly used for wireless communication, according to new research.

Also found in: [+]
Staten Island Ship Graveyard Becomes Sight-Seeing Destination 10.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Barbara Goldberg ON THE ARTHUR KILL, N.Y., July 10 (Reuters) - Bright colored kayaks bobbed around the rotted hull of a World War II submarine chaser that was rusted into a ghostly shell and lapped by water as salty as tears. The kayaks paddled by tourists then glided a few feet away to a decayed, partly submerged ferry, part of the "Graveyard of Ships" tour, which winds through a marine salvage yard in New York City that is the final resting place for dozens of working boats and military vessels. Once considered eyesores to steer clear of, some junkyards, underwater scrap yards and landfills are being recast as sight-seeing attractions. Sometimes dubbed "ruin tourism" or even "ruin porn," dramatic photographs online showing deteriorated boats emerging at low tide or automobile carcasses swallowed up by lush moss are enticing the public to see the decaying sites for themselves. "These sites are often appreciated for their authenticity or novelty value as a contemporary ruin," said Karl Kullmann, who ...
Also found in: [+]
University and college campuses are working toward Zero Waste 9.7.2015 TreeHugger
The Post-Landfill Action Network, launched at the University of New Hampshire, challenges campuses across the continent to start tackling waste seriously.
Also found in: [+]
Biodegradable disposable plates are made from food waste 8.7.2015 TreeHugger
Here's a new take on disposable tableware: these are made from discarded food.
Also found in: [+]
Smoke from open cooking fires kill 4 million people each year. These cookies can help. 5.7.2015 TreeHugger
3 billion people still use open fires for cooking and heating, and it's literally killing them. This smokeless cookstove and its fuel cookies are one effective solution.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 1,397