User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Sep 01 2014 03:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Large ‘dead zone’ signals continued problems for the Chesapeake Bay 31.8.2014 Washington Post

It began forming in May, when heavy spring rains loaded the rivers and creeks with fertilizer washed from farms and suburban lawns. It grew rapidly over the summer, as a broth of chemicals, animal waste and microbes simmered in the warm, slow-moving waters of the Chesapeake Bay.

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Government Looking For Trains To Haul Radioactive Waste, But There's Nowhere For Them To Go 31.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ATLANTA (AP) — The U.S. government is looking for trains to haul radioactive waste from nuclear power plants to disposal sites. Too bad those trains have nowhere to go. Putting the cart before the horse, the U.S. Department of Energy recently asked companies for ideas on how the government should get the rail cars needed to haul 150-ton casks filled with used, radioactive nuclear fuel. They won't be moving anytime soon. The latest government plans call for having an interim test storage site in 2021 and a long-term geologic depository in 2048. No one knows where those sites will be, but the Obama administration is already thinking about contracts to develop, test and certify the necessary rail equipment. U.S. Energy Department officials did not return messages seeking detailed comment. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Transportation share responsibility for regulating shipments. "We know we're going to have to do it, so you might as well do it," said James Conca, senior scientist ...
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Ordinary makeup ingredients with an element of surprise 30.8.2014 LA Times: Health
Common ingredients in cosmetics often hide in plain sight on the product label because of an international movement to establish uniform names, based in science and Latin. So wheat germ, prized for its vitamin E, becomes Triticum vulgare, and oatmeal, crucial to face masks through the ages,...
Train Carrying Propane Derails Near Canadian Border, Causes Evacuation 27.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WILLISTON, N.D. (AP) — A Burlington Northern Santa Fe train carrying unscented propane derailed near Canada's border with Minnesota and North Dakota early Tuesday, prompting the evacuation of about 40 people who live near the site, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said. Manitoba RCMP media relations officer Tara Seel said the RCMP responded to a train derailment in the town of Emerson at about 7:30 a.m. Tuesday. She added that no leaks were detected and no injuries were reported. Seel said the train was carrying unscented propane. BNSF spokeswoman Amy McBeth said the train was traveling from Grand Forks, North Dakota, toward Winnipeg, Manitoba, when three of its cars derailed at Emerson. She said two of the cars that derailed were carrying liquid propane gas and the third car was empty. McBeth said the cause of the accident is still being investigated. Andrew Kirking, the emergency manager of Pembina County on the North Dakota side of the border, said the train derailed about 100 yards into Canada and ...
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Trash Burning Far More Polluting Than Expected As Countries Often Fail To Report Emissions 27.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW DELHI (AP) — Rampant trash-burning is throwing more pollution and toxic particles into the air than governments are reporting, according to a scientific study estimating more than 40 percent of the world's garbage is burned. The study published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science and Technology attempts the first comprehensive assessment of global trash-burning data, including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, mercury and tiny particulate matter that can dim the sun's rays or clog human lungs. "Doing this study made me realize how little information we really have about garbage burning and waste management," said lead researcher Christine Wiedinmyer of the government-funded National Center for Atmospheric Research, in Boulder, Colorado. "What's really interesting is all the toxins. We need to look further at that." It also presents the first country-by-country index of rough emissions estimates for both carbon dioxide and toxic pollutants linked to human disease, though researchers ...
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Algae to power Electric Grand Prix 26.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Formula E penns a deal with UK firm Aquafuel to use glycerine-powered generators to recharge electric race cars.

Algae to power Electric Grand Prix
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Viruses Deflate Huge Algal Blooms at Sea 25.8.2014 Yahoo: Opinion/Editorial

Viruses Deflate Huge Algal Blooms at SeaThey also carry out about half of all photosynthesis on the planet, relying on pigments like chlorophyll to capture the sun's energy and, during the process that involves carbon dioxide, turning that energy into sugars. "They are the foundation of the entire life at sea," said the study's co-principal investigator Ilan Koren, an associate professor of earth and planetary sciences at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. "There is no life without these algal blooms."


Researchers Develop Transparent Solar Concentrator That Could Cover Windows, Electronics 24.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Scientists at the University of Michigan announced this week the creation of a “ transparent luminescent solar concentrator ” that could turn windows and even cellphone screens into solar-power generators. This technology could mean that one day entire skyscrapers might be able to generate solar power without blocking out light or ruining tenants' views. The material works by absorbing light in the invisible spectrum (ultraviolet and near infrared) and then re-emitting it in the infrared. The infrared light is then channeled to the edge of the clear surface, where thin strips of photovoltaic cells generate the power. Yimu Zhao, a doctoral student in chemical engineering and materials science, and Richard Lunt, assistant professor of chemical engineering and materials science, run a test in Lunt’s lab. Lunt and his team have developed a new material that can be placed over windows and create solar energy. Photo by G.L. Kohuth Because we cannot see infrared or ultraviolet light, the material remains ...
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Political Blotter: Bill would increase penalty for grease theft 23.8.2014 San Jose Mercury News: Politics
A bill to increase penalties for heists of used cooking oil is headed to Gov. Jerry Brown's desk with unanimous bipartisan support; also, Neel Kashkari offers a $25,000 scholarship to the college student who designs the best ad for his campaign.
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Wind Turbine Syndrome Cast Off By Courts As Developers Win Suits Filed By Disgruntled Neighbors 22.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Climate Central. To wind farm opponents, wind turbine syndrome is a manifold malady triggered by acoustic pulses and other unfortunate side effects of large wind turbines. To wind farm developers, syndrome claims can mean stomach-churning marches into courtrooms and municipal hearings, where legal teams defend projects against allegations they’re responsible for everything from headaches and sleeplessness to vertigo, blurred vision, and forgetfulness. In these legal fights, the wind energy developers are winning. To the judges presiding over the cases, evidence that wind turbine syndrome exists has seemed as wispy as the cirrus clouds that can herald a stiffening breeze. The Energy and Policy Institute , a clean energy advocacy group, reviewed rulings from 49 lawsuits and similar complaints filed in five Western countries. In a report published last week , the group says it could find just one case of a court siding with neighbors who claimed wind turbines had made them ...
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What if we could turn wastewater and algae into carbon-negative fuels and clean water? 20.8.2014 TreeHugger
Is this company getting closer to the dream of making truly sustainable carbon-negative fuel?
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When Forests Aren't Really Forests: The High Cost of Chile's Tree Plantaions 20.8.2014 Environmental News Network
At first glance, the statistics tell a hopeful story: Chile’s forests are expanding. According to Global Forest Watch, overall forest cover changes show approximately 300,000 hectares were gained between 2000 and 2013 in Chile’s central and southern regions. Specifically, 1.4 million hectares of forest cover were gained, while about 1.1 million hectares were lost. On the ground, however, a different scene plays out: monocultures have replaced diverse natural forests while Mapuche native protesters burn pine plantations, blockade roads and destroy logging equipment. At the crux of these two starkly contrasting narratives is the definition of a single word: “forest.”
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From Stalk to Stover: Edeniq is Innovating to Provide New Fuel for Your Gas Tank 20.8.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Larissa Koehler EDF’s Innovators Series profiles companies and people across California with bold solutions to reduce carbon pollution and help the state meet the goals of AB 32. Each addition to the series will profile a different solution, focused on the development of new technologies and ideas. The vast majority of Californians put ethanol in their car – it makes up about ten percent of every gallon we buy at the local filling station (not including diesel). This means that every year, drivers in the Golden State use about 1.5 billion gallons of this alternative fuel. Such widespread use of this fuel begs the question: What is ethanol’s environmental profile, and is everything being done to produce it as efficiently as possible? Over the years, a great deal of effort has gone into answering the first part of the question, and the answer is: it depends on many factors. Water use, land use , and fertilizer use are all factors associated with growing ethanol feedstocks (typically corn) that can ...
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Are electricity-eating bacteria the next big thing in green fuel? 20.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Columbia University researchers are making tiny organisms that consume renewable electricity and turn it into "electrofuel," the diesel of the future.

Are electricity-eating bacteria the next big thing in green fuel?
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The Way the Wind Blows May Not Be Enough to Prevent Ocean "Dead Zones" From Growing 19.8.2014 Truthout.com
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The Toledo Water Crisis Won’t Be the Last 19.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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The Way the Wind Blows May Not Be Enought to Prevent Ocean "Dead Zones" from Growing 19.8.2014 Truthout.com
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Toxic Algae Scare Prompts Backlash Against Farms 18.8.2014 Environmental News Network
What do a no-drink order in Toledo and a backlash against factory farming have in common? A lot, as it turns out. Residents of Ohio's fourth-largest city were advised for multiple days earlier this month to refrain from drinking their tap water because it had been contaminated by toxic algae. As residents struggled to deal with their contaminated water supply, the culprit behind the problem became readily apparent: factory farms. The Ohio Agriculture Advisory Council (OAAC) is proposing a regulatory crackdown that could forever change industrial farming practices in this Midwestern state.
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Minnesota agency: Warm weather brings out lake algae 17.8.2014 Twincities.com: Local

Our stretch of warm, calm weather has created ideal conditions for blue-green algae in lakes, according to the The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.

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Minn. agency: Warm weather brings out 'floating mats of scum' 17.8.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency says the recent stretch of warm, calm weather has brought good conditions for blue-green algae in lakes.
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