User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: May 23 2017 23:59 IST RSS 2.0
 
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EPA won’t declare Lake Erie’s waters in Ohio impaired 23.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

The decision means Ohio will continue to take the lead on fighting the algae blooms that in recent years have fouled drinking water in the shallowest of the Great Lakes.
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10 minutes with Aaron Stash, United Airlines 23.5.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Why this long-time marketer and musical theater buff is optimistic about his role as the 'Lorax' for sustainability at one of the world's largest airlines.
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Can bacteria save lake bogged down by algae? 14.5.2017 Philly.com News
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Company whirls idea of biofuel refinery in Washington 10.5.2017 AP Washington
LONGVIEW, Wash. (AP) -- A Houston-based company has shown interest in developing a biofuel refinery in Washington....
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Wildlife-rich lagoon in Florida threatened by building boom 4.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
On the Indian River Lagoon, Fla. • The most biologically diverse waterway in America is seriously ill. The Indian River Lagoon is repeatedly being choked with oxygen-robbing algae, its surface increasingly dotted with thousands of dead fish, manatees, birds and other creatures. The culprits: farm runoff and a huge influx of people that has sent lawn fertilizer and other pollutants into the lagoon, which runs 156 miles along Florida’s Atlantic Coast, almost to Palm Beach, and includes the Cape Ca...
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Building boom threatens wildlife-rich Florida lagoon 4.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
On the Indian River Lagoon, Fla. • The most biologically diverse waterway in America is seriously ill. The Indian River Lagoon is repeatedly being choked with oxygen-robbing algae, its surface increasingly dotted with thousands of dead fish, manatees, birds and other creatures. The culprits: farm runoff and a huge influx of people that has sent lawn fertilizer and other pollutants into the lagoon, which runs 156 miles along Florida’s Atlantic Coast, almost to Palm Beach, and includes the Cape Ca... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Wildlife-rich lagoon in Florida threatened by building boom 4.5.2017 AP National
ON THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON, Fla. (AP) -- The most biologically diverse waterway in America is seriously ill....
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Wildlife-rich lagoon in Florida threatened by building boom 4.5.2017 Seattle Times: Local

ON THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON, Fla. (AP) — The most biologically diverse waterway in America is seriously ill. The Indian River Lagoon is repeatedly being choked with oxygen-robbing algae, its surface increasingly dotted with thousands of dead fish, manatees, birds and other creatures. The culprits: farm runoff and a huge influx of people that has […]
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Over 2,900 species: A look at Florida’s Indian River Lagoon 4.5.2017 Seattle Times: Local

ON THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON, Fla. (AP) — Florida’s Indian River Lagoon, which is actually three lagoons stretching 156 miles along the state’s Atlantic Coast, is the nation’s biggest barrier island complex and its most biodiverse waterway, according to federal officials. Some facts about the lagoon: —It is home to more than 2,000 plant species, […]
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Nearly 200 million chickens, turkeys and cows are making a mess of the Shenandoah River 26.4.2017 Washington Post
Nearly 200 million chickens, turkeys and cows are making a mess of the Shenandoah River
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Sea Lions In California Are Dying From A Toxic Algae That Ravages Their Brains 21.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Algae so toxic that it’s causing fatal brain damage in California sea lions is the latest problem plaguing ocean animal rescue operations along the Pacific coast. Domoic acid poisoning is emerging as a key threat this year to the animals that ingest the toxin while eating fish and other sea creatures that feed on algae, rescue organizations in southern California warn. Some birds and dolphins have also been affected by the algae, which authorities warn can be harmful to humans who eat shellfish. The neurotoxin that the Pseudo nitzschia algae produces can destroy the brains of sea lions until they no longer know basic survival functions , such as how to evade predators and find food. It can cause sea lions to have seizures and paralysis, while one of the key signs of this dementia is when they are seen rolling their heads repeatedly.  And a spokesman for the Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute told the Ventura County Star that this is the “ worst year ever ” for cases of domoic acid ...
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Lake Koronis is test lab in fight against invasive species 20.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Experts say they need more research to figure out how to combat and control starry stonewort. Some lake advocates say the DNR isn't doing enough to prevent it from spreading to lakes throughout Minnesota.
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More California sea lions are dying because of poisonous algae blooms 20.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

During an average year, rescue workers at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach may encounter one pregnant sea lion suffering from domoic acid poisoning — a potentially deadly illness that occurs when the animals eat fish that have been feeding on toxic algae.

In the last two weeks however,...

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8 sea lions die from algae-produced toxin off Orange County, marine mammal center says 15.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

A toxin produced by algal blooms in the Pacific Ocean is the suspected culprit in multiple sea lion deaths, an official with Laguna Beach’s Pacific Marine Mammal Center said.

Since April 4, the center that cares for marine mammals stranded from Seal Beach south to San Onofre has rescued 15 sea...

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Scientists engineer sugarcane to produce biodiesel, more sugar for ethanol 4.4.2017 Environmental News Network
A multi-institutional team led by the University of Illinois have proven sugarcane can be genetically engineered to produce oil in its leaves and stems for biodiesel production. Surprisingly, the modified sugarcane plants also produced more sugar, which could be used for ethanol production. 
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20 Years Researching Harmful Algal Blooms Supports Sustainable Water Supply in Wichita 4.4.2017 Environmental News Network
Two decades of harmful algal bloom, nutrient and sediment research by the U.S. Geological Survey is helping to support Wichita’s long-term vision of a sustainable water supply into the future. Early warning indicators of harmful algal blooms have been developed for Cheney Reservoir, Kansas, according to a new USGS publication done in cooperation with the City of Wichita, Kansas.
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Scientists develop ‘Grassoline’ to power airplanes of the future 2.4.2017 Technology – The Indian Express
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Utah Lake marina dredging delayed until fall 28.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Provo • A $1.3 million dredging project planned for the Utah Lake State Park Marina in April is being delayed probably until after Labor Day. The postponement is due to a number of factors, including too few bidders in the original request, rising water levels and concern not to interrupt the spawning season for the lake’s endangered June suckers, according to Jason Allen, manager of the Utah Lake State Park. “Technically we could start August 1, but with spawning season going late into the se...
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This is how green algae assemble their enzymes 27.3.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
For almost a decade, researchers from Bochum have been developing biotechnological methods for hydrogen production. Green algae might be the key.Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analysed how green algae manufacture complex components of a hydrogen-producing enzyme. The enzyme, known as the hydrogenase, may be relevant for the biotechnological production of hydrogen.To date, little is known about the way organisms form this type of hydrogenases under natural conditions. Using novel synthetic biology methods, the team around Dr Anne Sawyer, PhD student Yu Bai, assistant professor Dr Anja Hemschemeier and Prof Dr Thomas Happe from the Bochum-based research group Photobiotechnology, discovered that a specific protein machinery in the green algal chloroplasts is required for the production of a functional hydrogenase. The researchers published their findings in “The Plant ...
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Climate Change This Week: Coral Collapse Presages Our Own, Fascinating Facts, and More! 24.3.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
@@ Climate Change Is Killing The Great Barrier Reef - Takeaways: Coral reefs are bleaching and dying worldwide due to warming oceans: 90% of coral nutrition comes from algae living within them; As corals heat, the algae photosynthesize faster, And produce a toxin, ultimately forcing corals to expel them. Deprived of colorful algae, corals turn white and starts starving. Once dead, corals are rapidly covered with brown algae. Seascapes of Bleached Coral are spectres of mass starvation. Under current conditions, these “undersea rainforests” will disappear forever within 10-30 years. Once these reefs are gone, we lose permanently an important source of: Food for over half a billion people, coastal protection from storms and erosion, and biodiversity. We know human activities are fueling global warming, but are failing to act. Ultimately, this story is our failure of intelligence and morality. Like bacteria, we are: Reproducing without recognizing our resource constraints, Using those resources wantonly, And ...
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