User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Jul 27 2016 18:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Biological wizardry ferments carbon monoxide into biofuel 27.7.2016 Environmental News Network
Cornell University biological engineers have deciphered the cellular strategy to make the biofuel ethanol, using an anaerobic microbe feeding on carbon monoxide - a common industrial waste gas."Instead of having the waste go to waste, you make it into something you want," said Ludmilla Aristilde, assistant professor in biological and environmental engineering. "In order to make the microbes do our work, we had to figure out how they work, their metabolism."Aristilde collaborated with her colleague Lars Angenent, professor of biological and environmental engineering, on the project. She explained, "The Angenent group had taken a waste product and turned it into a useful product."To make biofuel from inorganic, gaseous industrial rubbish, the researchers learned that the bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii responds thermodynamically - rather than genetically - in the process of tuning favorable enzymatic ...
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'We’ve primed the system': Why disgusting toxic blue-green algae blooms seem increasingly common 25.7.2016 Washington Post
'We’ve primed the system': Why disgusting toxic blue-green algae blooms seem increasingly common
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Op-ed: To halt algal blooms, Utah has to stop feeding them 24.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The recent algae bloom in Utah Lake garnered considerable attention from the media and public — as it should. Cyanobacteria (also called blue-green algae) can produce some of the most powerful natural poisons (toxins) known. And the current bloom might predict problems in other waters. So we must work together to reduce the nutrients feeding the algae: excess nitrogen and phosphorus, mostly coming from wastewater treatment plants that were not typically designed to remove nutrients. Algae blooms...
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Environmental regulators say levels of toxic algae decreasing; Utah Lake water OK for irrigation 23.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The Utah County Health Department has decided to end its closure of the Jordan River in Utah County, but Utah Lake remains closed and health advisories remain in effect, based on the latest data from the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). The most recent set of tests found that concentrations of cyanobacteria in Utah Lake have decreased in most locations to nonthreatening levels, with the exceptions of Lincoln Harbor and the American Fork harbor, where counts continue to exceed the ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Toxic algae bloom swarms Utah Lake, seeps into farm supply 23.7.2016 AP National
SPANISH FORK, Utah (AP) -- A huge toxic algae bloom in Utah has closed one of the largest freshwater lakes west of the Mississippi River, sickening more than 100 people and leaving farmers scrambling for clean water for days during the hottest part of the year....
Jordan River re-opens in Utah County after algal bloom; warning remains in effect 23.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The Utah County Health Department has decided to end its closure of the Jordan River in Utah County, but health advisories remain in effect. Ainslynn Tolman-Hill said the county health department decided to life the closure in light of recent test results that indicate the concentration of toxic cyanobacteria in the river is declining. However, she said, the department continues to encourage people to avoid the river, because the algae is still present in potentially harmful concentrations. “Dan...
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Toxic algae bloom swarms Utah Lake, seeps into farm supply 23.7.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

SPANISH FORK, Utah (AP) — A huge toxic algae bloom in Utah has closed one of the largest freshwater lakes west of the Mississippi River, sickening more than 100 people and leaving farmers scrambling for clean water during some of the hottest days of the year. The bacteria commonly known as blue-green algae has spread […]
Lichen is a famous biological partnership — but it might actually be a threesome 22.7.2016 Washington Post
Lichen is a famous biological partnership — but it might actually be a threesome
Utah Lake’s Poop-Driven Algal Bloom Is a Crappy Situation 22.7.2016 Wired Top Stories
Utah Lake’s Poop-Driven Algal Bloom Is a Crappy Situation
It's big. It's green. It's algae caused by ... well, take a guess. The post Utah Lake's Poop-Driven Algal Bloom Is a Crappy Situation appeared first on WIRED.
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News roundup: The #NeverTrump crowd not giving up as Trump claims nomination 22.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
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Editorial: To kill algae blooms, we need to tidy the bowl 22.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Add toxic blue-green algae to the growing list of Utah environmental challenges. Actually, algae blooms are not a brand new problem, but they are getting worse. And the one that blossomed on Utah Lake last week is on a scale apparently never seen. Virtually the entire lake has been consumed, and it has spread to the Jordan River and Little Cottonwood Creek. With hot, calm weather ahead, more are possible. The blooms are a sight to behold, but don’t be holding them. The entire lake is closed to... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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State officials mull declaration of emergency as toxic algae surface in Davis County 22.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake County officials are exploring the possibility of declaring a state of emergency due to the ongoing algal bloom in Utah Lake and the Jordan River. Steve Sautter, manager of Salt Lake County Emergency Management’s Joint Information Center, said county officials have spoken with state leaders about the possibility of declaring an official emergency, which could give the state access to federal funds to pay for damages associated with the bloom. The presence of cyanobacteria — the poison... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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'Behind the Headlines': Shurtleff's edge, algal threat, Zika and, of course, Trump's unconventional convention 21.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Utah Lake’s algal bloom proves problematic for Salt Lake, Utah and Davis counties. Davis County Attorney Troy Rawlings seeks dismissal of all charges against former Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff. A caregiver of a Zika-infected Utahn who died has also contracted the virus. And the unconventional Donald Trump becomes the official GOP presidential nominee at the party’s Cleveland convention. On Friday at 9 a.m., Salt Lake Tribune reporters Jennifer Dobner, Emma Penrod and Alex Stuckey as we... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Op-ed: Algal bloom is harbinger of warmer future 21.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
All along Florida’s waterways, fish are dying, beaches are closing and people are getting sick from a massive, toxic algae stew. The irony is almost as thick as the green slime itself because Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency and is pleading with the federal government, which he dutifully loathes as a conservative, for assistance to cope with algal blooms connected to global warming, which he denies. Of course the disposition of Utah’s political leaders is similar, and so is the...
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‘Way too many problems’ with state’s carbon-reduction rule, critics say 21.7.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

The Department of Ecology, working under a court-ordered deadline, pushes to finalize a carbon-reduction rule that has critics weighing in from all sides.
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Why toxic algae blooms like Florida's are so dangerous to people and wildlife 20.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Ernst B. Peebles , University of South Florida Reported cases of algal blooms, when algae grow rapidly from an influx of nutrients in waterways, have been rising at an exponential rate in recent decades. Industrialized countries have the highest incidence with North America, Europe and eastern Asia being hotbeds for new cases due to runoff from industry and cities as well as these areas' intensive use of manufactured fertilizers. These events often cause a noticeable change in the color and smell of natural water bodies and may be accompanied by highly visible fish kills or even respiratory distress in humans who inhale tiny, aerosol particles created by wind and waves. A highly visible new case recently developed in Florida, where a particularly intense bloom of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) formed in Lake Okeechobee, the largest freshwater lake in the state. As is often the case with today's larger, more intense blooms, the event was visible to satellites orbiting in space. This year's Lake ...
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Tobacco-fueled airliner takes off 20.7.2016 CNN: Top Stories
The first commercial planes in Africa to use biofuels carried 300 passengers between Johannesburg and Cape Town on July 15.
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Additional waters closed as 'unprecedented' Utah Lake algal bloom moves north 20.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Algal monitoring efforts continue to move northward as state environmental officials strive to get a handle on what the largest algal bloom in Utah Lake’s history means for Utah water quality. This is the first known instance where a bloom originating in Utah Lake has affected the Jordan River and other downstream systems. And concentrations within the bloom are exceptionally high, with some samples surpassing tens of millions of cyanobacteria — the so-called toxin-producing algae — per millilit... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Farmers fear for crops as Utah Lake algae threat spreads to Salt Lake County 19.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Stephanie Cannon’s tomatoes may go dry this week if algae from Utah Lake make their way into her irrigation canal. “I wouldn’t feel uncomfortable about watering my lawn with” irrigation water from the canal, said Cannon, a commercial tomato grower and president of the Upper Canal Irrigation Co. in Millcreek and Holladay, “but I don’t want to put it on our tomatoes.” State water officials announced Sunday that algae from Utah Lake, where a toxic algal bloom was discovered last week, appear to hav... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Obama Should Tell Florida Gov. Rick Scott: This Emergency Is Yours... Own It 18.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When Gov. Rick Scott recently asked President Obama to declare a federal emergency over the toxic algae catastrophe coating South Florida's coasts, my head nearly exploded. It is the zenith of hypocrisy for Gov. Scott to plead for federal assistance on the algae bloom catastrophe when his entire record is hacking, whittling and chopping federal authority into little, little pieces. And not just any federal authority -- specifically federal rules to regulate fertilizers and specifically federal actions to hold Florida accountable. Many decades ago, the U.S. EPA "delegated" full responsibility to Florida to manage the state's water pollution regulations while preserving the federal right to protect all Americans' air and water quality. Tight control of pollution, it turns out, is the last thing that top campaign funders -- like Big Sugar -- want. As a result, the Republicans war against the U.S. EPA has been unremitting. Florida's GOP has been on its own jihad against federal authority, claiming states' ...
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