User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Feb 27 2015 02:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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From Green Glop to Black Gold 27.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Don Willlmott Don Willmott is a New York-based journalist who writes about technology, travel, and the environment for a wide variety of publications and websites. Call it the pond scum sustainability solution. Green algae has a promising future as an alternative energy source--assuming that the right kind of biochemistry is liberally applied. Algae is everywhere, it grows easily, and it's full of lipids that, when successfully extracted, have the perfect chemical makeup to be transformed into hydrocarbon fuel. The trick, as always, is to do the processing in a cost-effective and cost-efficient way, a goal that has been elusive so far. Enter Nevada-based Algae Systems, which has built a test plant on Alabama's Mobile Bay to not only turn algae into diesel fuel, but also extract potable water out of sewage and manufacture fertilizer as well. In fact, this solution is as much about wastewater treatment as it is about alternative fuel production. Algae grows inside large floating bags that take advantage ...
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US House approves bill to step up fight against toxic algae 26.2.2015 Yahoo: US National
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Members of Congress have called for more aggressive federal action to prevent toxic algae from contaminating the Great Lakes and other waterways around the nation, such as an outbreak on Lake Erie last summer that left more than 400,000 people without safe tap water for two days.
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US Addiction to Corn and Cars Is Fueling Global Hunger and Displacement 26.2.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Counting the Cost of the Global Biofuels Boom 25.2.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Friendly Fungi Could Help Barley Growers 24.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Botanists from Trinity College Dublin have made a breakthrough discovery that could save barley farmers sleepless nights and millions of Euro each year: naturally occurring plant-friendly fungi prevent crop-ravishing diseases from spreading, and also aid plant survival in testing environmental conditions. Importantly, these amazing little organisms cause no harm to the plant roots in which they take up their abode. However, their gift of immunity against common seed diseases greatly reduces the need for farmers to spray environmentally damaging chemicals, which can affect ecosystems in a plethora of negative ways.
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Oxfam welcomes European Parliament vote to lower cap on biofuels threatening food security 24.2.2015 Oxfam International RSS main feed

Oxfam welcomes European Parliament vote to lower cap on biofuels threatening food security

Today the European Parliament’s Environment Committee voted in favor of tightening the cap on biofuels competing with food production for land and other precious resources, such as water.

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New study: algae pollution makes coastal communities vulnerable to ocean acidification damage 23.2.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Ann Alexander, Senior Attorney, Chicago: In case we needed yet another reason to worry about the runaway algae choking our nation's waterways, we've now got one. A new study by scientists at NRDC collaborating with UC Davis, Ocean Conservancy, and Duke University shows that the...
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Should We Experiment With Climate Geoengineering? 23.2.2015 Truthout.com
The US National Academy of Sciences announced its long-awaited reports on climate geoengineering in mid-February. The reports intelligently state at the outset that geoengineering is no substitute for reducing emissions. But the call for experimentation and research - and for federal government funding for it - is pervasive, loud and clear. And worrisome. A similar call for research was published as a commentary in Nature. Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this: They can't be found in corporate media! Make a tax-deductible donation today. The US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) announced its long-awaited reports on climate geoengineering in mid-February. The reports intelligently state at the outset that geoengineering is no substitute for reducing emissions. But the call for experimentation and research - and for federal government funding for it - is pervasive, loud and clear. And worrisome. A similar call for research was published as a commentary in Nature, conveniently timed just a few ...
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AP Exclusive: Fuel-hauling trains could derail at 10 a year 23.2.2015 Philly.com News
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) - The federal government predicts that trains hauling crude oil or ethanol will derail an average of 10 times a year over the next two decades, causing more than $4 billion in damage and possibly killing hundreds of people if an accident happens in a densely populated part of the U.S.
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Fed predicts up to 10 derailments a year of fuel-hauling trains 23.2.2015 Star Tribune: Nation
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Fuel-hauling trains could derail at 10 a year 23.2.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
The federal government predicts that trains hauling crude oil or ethanol will derail an average of 10 times a year over the next two decades.
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Fuel Trains Could Derail Up To 10 Times A Year Over Next Two Decades, Feds Predict 22.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The federal government predicts that trains hauling crude oil or ethanol will derail an average of 10 times a year over the next two decades, causing more than $4 billion in damage and possibly killing hundreds of people if an accident happens in a densely populated part of the U.S. The projection comes from a previously unreported analysis by the Department of Transportation that reviewed the risks of moving vast quantities of both fuels across the nation and through major cities. The study completed last July took on new relevance this week after a train loaded with crude derailed in West Virginia, sparked a spectacular fire and forced the evacuation of hundreds of families. Monday's accident was the latest in a spate of fiery derailments, and senior federal officials said it drives home the need for stronger tank cars, more effective braking systems and other safety improvements. "This underscores why we need to move as quickly as possible getting these regulations in place," ...
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AP Exclusive: Fuel-hauling trains could derail at 10 a year 22.2.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The federal government predicts that trains hauling crude oil or ethanol will derail an average of 10 times a year over the next two decades, causing more than $4 billion in damage and possibly killing hundreds of people if an accident happens in a densely populated part of the ...
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AP Exclusive: Fuel-hauling trains could derail at 10 a year 22.2.2015 Star Tribune: Latest
The federal government predicts that trains hauling crude oil or ethanol will derail an average of 10 times a year over the next two decades, causing more than $4 billion in damage and possibly killing hundreds of people if an accident happens in a densely populated part of the U.S.
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Giant African land snails invading Cuba 20.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Kennedy couldn’t manage it in 1961, but someone else has. According to the BBC, Giant African Land Snails have been spotted on Cuban soil, which is bad news for native molluscs in the island nation as well as numerous plants. As if that weren’t bad enough, they also pose a health risk to people. This is one invasion Cubans definitely want to stop in its tracks, and for once the CIA has absolutely nothing to do with it.These snails have a number of characteristics that make them a formidable problem in regions where they’ve been introduced, which includes parts of Asia, Central America, and the US. For starters, they’re big. Really big. Giant African Snails typically grow up to eight inches long, and they’ve been known to get even bigger. They lay hundreds of eggs every month, with a very high hatch rate, ensuring that once a few snails make land, they can quickly spread across a region and they’re extremely difficult to stop — in part because applying molluscicide would kill other species. Also ...
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Des Moines versus Goliath: drinking water supplier tired of paying for algae mess it didn't make 12.2.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Ann Alexander, Senior Attorney, Chicago: EPA has thus far shown no backbone in addressing the algae pollution plaguing the nation, but at least one victim of that crisis is responding like a vertebrate. The Des Moines Water Works, sick and tired of paying for costly...
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Plant turns cow manure to ethanol 11.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Tulare County, California, recently surpassed nearby Fresno County as the top agriculture-producing county in terms of economic value within the U.S. It’s also the country’s top dairy producing county. The result has been more investment and economic growth in a rapidly booming area already home to 450,000 people.But there is also a downside to the local dairy industry’s continued surge: The San Joaquin Valley suffers from some of worst air pollution in the U.S., and cow effluent is a threat to the region’s already troubled watersheds.
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Why we still need alternative fuels when gas is cheap 11.2.2015 MinnPost
Retail gasoline prices in Minnesota are at their lowest in five years, and for the vast majority of Minnesota motorists, that’s very good news. Now that we are paying less at pump, some are beginning to suggest that we no longer need cleaner alternatives to petroleum, or that Americans will soon return to driving more and purchasing big, inefficient vehicles. But there is still a strong case for using alternative fuels, even as gasoline prices drop.  Here are five reasons Minnesota should stick to alternatives to petroleum: Robert Moffitt 1. The cost of alternative fuels have dropped, too. The price of all fuels varies widely by location and retailer, but generally speaking biofuels such as E85 and E30 have been priced less than regular unleaded in Minnesota. The owners of flex fuel vehicles have responded to these lower prices, keeping sales strong throughout 2014. In November 2014, more than 1.3 million gallons of cleaner-burning E85 were sold in the state, an increase over the same period in 2013. As ...
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On the News With Thom Hartmann: EPA Gives President Obama Cover to Reject Keystone XL, and More 10.2.2015 Truthout.com
In today's On the News segment: According to the EPA, the tar sands oil that will flow through the Keystone XL pipeline presents a huge risk to our nation and our environment; Facebook knows what you look like; a toxic algae bloom in California has killed at least three dogs, and it doesn't spell good news for the future; and more. TRANSCRIPT: Thom Hartmann here - on the best of the rest of....science & green news..... You need to know this. The Environmental Protection Agency does a lot to keep us all safe from pollution. But, one of their recent actions may go down in history as more important than the rest. Last week, the EPA delivered a letter to the State Department, and with it, that agency gave our President the cover to reject the Keystone XL pipeline. According to Cynthia Giles, the top enforcement official at the EPA, the tar sands oil that will flow through that pipeline presents a huge risk to our nation and our environment. Miss Giles explained that these risks include a "significant ...
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Monstrous algal bloom erupts in world's largest lake 10.2.2015 New Scientist: Sex and Cloning
The Caspian Sea has a surface area larger than Germany – and is heavily polluted by phosphorus. The enrichment promotes huge algal ...
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