User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Jul 28 2017 09:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Warming to worsen dead zones, algae blooms choking US waters 28.7.2017 Science / Technology News

In this image provided by NASA, taken Aug. 3, 2015, phytoplankton is seen off the coast of New York, top and New Jersey, left. A new study projects that global warming's increased rains will mean more nitrogen flowing into U.S. waterways, which can then trigger more massive blooms of algae, floating green mats, and dead zones with almost no oxygen.

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Projected Precipitation Increases Are Bad News for Water Quality 28.7.2017 Environmental News Network
If climate change is not curbed, increased precipitation could substantially overload U.S. waterways with excess nitrogen, according to a new study from Carnegie’s Eva Sinha and Anna Michalak and Princeton University’s Venkatramani Balaji published by Science. Excess nutrient pollution increases the likelihood of events that severely impair water quality. The study found that impacts will be especially strong in the Midwest and Northeast.
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The surprising way climate change could worsen toxic algal blooms 28.7.2017 Washington Post
The surprising way climate change could worsen toxic algal blooms
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Warming to worsen dead zones, algae blooms choking US waters 27.7.2017 Seattle Times: Local

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study projects that increases in rain from global warming could further choke U.S. waterways with fertilizer runoff that trigger dead zones and massive algae blooms. Researchers calculate that if greenhouse gas emissions keep rising, more rain will increase nitrogen flowing into lakes, rivers, bays and coastal areas by about 19 […]
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Canadian airlines aiming to become biofuel superpower, reduce carbon footprint 26.7.2017 Science / Technology News

The country's top airlines say resource-rich Canada has the potential to become a biofuel superpower by transforming forest residue and agricultural crops into energy that can help the industry reduce greenhouse gas emissions. "Canada actually has an opportunity like no other country where it can displace large amounts of fuel and reduce large amounts of carbon," Mena Salib, Air Canada's manager of aircraft noise and emissions, said Tuesday after speaking to a global biotech conference.

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Infected Insects Cause a Stink 25.7.2017 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
Tiny eel-like creatures called nematodes are surrounding us. While they can be free-living (a cup of soil or seawater contains thousands), the most well-known nematodes are the parasitic kind that wreak havoc in people, animals and plants.
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Boulder fish deaths blamed on algae, hot weather 25.7.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
Boulder officials believe high heat and recent rains led to an algae bloom in Tantra Lake that killed hundreds of fish over the weekend.
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New robotic lab tracking toxicity of Lake Erie algal bloom 22.7.2017 Environmental News Network
A new research tool to safeguard drinking water is now keeping a watchful eye on Lake Erie. This week, a robotic lake-bottom laboratory began tracking the levels of dangerous toxins produced by cyanobacteria that bloom each summer in the lake's western basin.The goal is to provide advance warning to municipal drinking water managers and thereby prevent a recurrence of the water crisis that left more than 400,000 Toledo-area residents without safe drinking water for about two days in early August 2014 due to high levels of microcystin toxins.
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Native leech preys on invasive slug? 21.7.2017 Environmental News Network
The giant slug Limax maximus is native to Europe and Asia Minor but has spread widely, being found in North America, South America, North Africa, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and other regions. The slug is recognized as a notorious pest because it eats agricultural and garden crops.
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University-led study looks to reduce methane gas emissions in cattle 20.7.2017 Environmental News Network
Seeking to mitigate the greenhouse gas contributions of the region’s agricultural sector, a University of Lethbridge-led study has been granted $1.1 million by the federal government’s Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program.“Canadian farmers are great stewards of the land and the environment. These new investments are part of the government’s commitment to addressing climate change and ensuring our farmers are world leaders in the use and development of clean and sustainable technology and processes,” says Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.
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Developing new technology for cheaper biofuel 19.7.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
PhD chemistry student Leila Dehabadi has developed a new way to separate water from ethanol, the key component in alcoholic beverages and biofuel, using starch-based materials such as corn. The method could reduce costs because it doesn’t involve using additional energy to isolate the ethanol.“Compared to distillation, this new approach based on green chemistry and engineering will be a significant saving to biofuel and alcohol production in Saskatchewan and globally by changing the way water is separated from ethanol mixtures,” said Lee Wilson, U of S chemistry professor and Dehabadi’s supervisor. 
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New USGS Filter Removes Phosphorus from Waste Water 19.7.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
A tabletop water filter demo designed to remove phosphorus from waste water has in five-years grown into a fully functional water treatment system capable of filtering more than 100-thousand gallons per day.Designed by a small U.S. Geological Survey team, this cost-effective and environmentally friendly water filter system uses discarded mining byproducts, called mine drainage ochre, as the primary filtering agent to remove phosphorus from municipal and agricultural waste waters.
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Harnessing the right amount of sunshine 18.7.2017 Environmental News Network
Photosynthesis, which allows energy from the sun to be converted into life-sustaining sugars, can also be hazardous to green plants. If they absorb too much sunlight, the extra energy destroys their tissue.To combat this, green plants have developed a defense mechanism known as photoprotection, which allows them to dissipate the extra energy. Researchers from MIT and the University of Verona have now discovered how the key protein in this process allows moss and green algae to protect themselves from too much sun.
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First a toxic algal bloom, now elevated E. coli levels — and double the health risk at Utah Lake 15.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Health officials continue to urge residents to stay out of the water at Utah Lake, even more so now that a second potentially harmful bacteria has entered the fray. The Utah County Health Department posted warning signs at Sandy Beach on Friday afternoon, after the amount of E. coli collected in a routine water sample exceeded the threshold considered safe for recreation. The entire lake is under a warning, due to a toxic algal bloom that developed there late last month. Aislynn Tolman-Hill, a s...
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E. coli prompts warning in already contaminated Utah Lake 15.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Health officials continue to urge residents to stay out of the water at Utah Lake, even more so now that a second potentially harmful bacteria has entered the fray. The Utah County Health Department posted warning signs at Sandy Beach on Friday afternoon, after the amount of E. coli collected in a routine water sample exceeded the threshold considered safe for recreation. The entire lake is under a warning, due to a toxic algal bloom that developed there late last month. Aislynn Tolman-Hill, a s... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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NOAA, partners predict significant summer harmful algal bloom for western Lake Erie 15.7.2017 Environmental News Network
NOAA and its research partners predict that western Lake Erie will experience a significant harmful algal bloom this summer, potentially reaching levels last seen in 2013 and 2014, though smaller than the record bloom of 2015.This year’s bloom is expected to measure 7.5 on the severity index, but could range between six and 9.5. An index above five indicates a potentially harmful bloom. The severity index is based on a bloom’s biomass – the amount of its harmful algae – over a sustained period. The largest blooms, 2011 and 2015, were 10 and 10.5, respectively.
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New biofuel technology cuts production time significantly 13.7.2017 Environmental News Network
New research from a professor of engineering at UBC’s Okanagan Campus might hold the key to biofuels that are cheaper, safer and much faster to produce.“Methane is a biofuel commonly used in electricity generation and is produced by fermenting organic material,” says Cigdem Eskicioglu, an associate professor with UBC Okanagan’s School of Engineering. “The process can traditionally take anywhere from weeks to months to complete, but with my collaborators from Europe and Australia we’ve discovered a new biomass pretreatment technique that can cut production time nearly in half.”
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Debate: Whoa. Imagine how messed up we’d be if we weren’t so well managed... 13.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
One of these things is not like the others. — Utah physicians group alarmed by studies linking more deaths to air pollution — Emma Penrod | The Salt Lake Tribune — Health warnings on Utah Lake expanded as algal bloom spreads and neurotoxin detected — Emma Penrod | The Salt Lake Tribune — Two studies give Utah state government Top 5 financial ratings — Lee Davidson | The Salt Lake Tribune What you care about is what you manage well. <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Health warnings on Utah Lake expanded as toxic bloom continues to grow 13.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Officials say residents should avoid contact with the waters of Utah Lake in light of the detection of a deadly toxin. A bloom of toxic algae, detected late last month, has continued to grow and now appears to cover the majority of the lake west of Provo, according to state officials. And all of the latest samples from the lake tested positive for low levels of anatoxin, a neuro toxin that can be fatal if ingested. Though toxin levels have not yet reached concentrations thought to be fatal, Utah...
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Hundreds of species of fungi in deep coral ecosystems discovered by University of Hawaii at Manoa botanists 13.7.2017 Environmental News Network
Researchers from the University of Hawai?i at M?noa Department of Botany have discovered hundreds of potentially new species of fungi in the deep coral ecosystem in the ?Au?au channel off Maui, Hawai?i. Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCE) are generally found at depths between 130–500 feet and possess abundant plant (algal) life as well as new fish species. The mysteries of these reefs are only recently being revealed through technological advances in closed circuit rebreather diving. Previously overlooked—being too precarious for conventional SCUBA and too shallow to justify the cost of frequent submersible dives—mesophotic reefs continuously disclose breathtaking levels of biodiversity with each dive, yielding species and behavioral interactions new to science.
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