User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Aug 29 2015 22:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Algae drives down property values on Lake Champlain 29.8.2015 AP Business
GEORGIA, Vt. (AP) -- The two cottages on the shore of Lake Champlain will someday be passed down to her children but Enid Letourneau worries the algae that turns the shoreline pea-soup green each August means they won't amount to much of an inheritance....
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Algae drives down property values on Lake Champlain 29.8.2015 Yahoo: US National
GEORGIA, Vt. (AP) — The two cottages on the shore of Lake Champlain will someday be passed down to her children but Enid Letourneau worries the algae that turns the shoreline pea-soup green each August means they won't amount to much of an ...
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Baby Sea Lions Are Dying 26.8.2015 Mother Jones
Sea lions have been having a rough couple of years. In 2013, starving pups began washing up on California beaches by the hundreds. This year, the number of stranded sea lions has increased dramatically. And now, a giant toxic algal bloom is growing in the Pacific and poisoning sea lions' sources of food. How bad has it gotten for these playful critters? We talked to wildlife experts to find out more about how much danger they're in and what's in store for their future: What's going on here? What's causing sea lions to get so sick? An unusually warm pocket of water in the Pacific , dubbed " the blob ," has rocked the sea lions' environment on the Pacific coast. The anchovies, hake, squid, and shell fish that sea lions eat have been moving farther away to find nutrient-rich cold waters. While adult sea lions have been adapting and going longer distances to find food, pups and yearlings don't have the strength to swim far enough or dive deep enough. Instead, young sea lions have been washing up on shore. ...
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Not All Renewable Energy Is Created Equal 25.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Renewable energy is hot right now. Maybe it's because renewables are rapidly becoming more affordable. Maybe it's because President Obama's recent publicity push surrounding his Clean Power Plan is driving interest in climate action. Or perhaps it's because Americans are fascinated by enigmatic entrepreneurs, and Elon Musk of Solar City and Tesla battery ambitions, seems to fit the bill. This discussion is badly needed and should be welcomed. Watching at least some presidential candidates competing over whose renewable energy plan is best is progress - even if some of them are still ignoring climate change. But plans to promote renewable energy should be carefully crafted and considered. Not all sources of renewable energy are the same. And not all types of renewable energy will benefit the environment or people and communities. For many, renewable energy is "good" energy - after all, it's not made from fossil fuels so it must be good for the environment and for people, right? Unfortunately, that's not ...
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A Giant Glob of Deadly Algae Is Floating off the West Coast 25.8.2015 Mother Jones
From the air, the Pacific algal bloom doesn't look like much of a threat: a wispy, brownish stream, snaking up along the West Coast. But it's causing amnesia in birds, deadly seizures in sea lions, and a crippling decline in the West Coast shellfish industry. Here's what you need to know about it, from what this bloom has to do with the drought to why these toxins could be a real threat to the homeless. What's causing it? The culprit is a single-celled plant called pseudo-nitzschia, one of thousands of species of algae that produce more than 50 percent of the world's oxygen through photosynthesis. They're a hardy variety usually found in cool, shallow oceans, where they survive on light and dissolved nutrients, including silcates, nitrates, and phosphates. "They're sort of like the dandelions of the sea," says Vera Trainer, who manages the Marine Biotoxin Program at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle. "They're always there in some low numbers, just waiting for nutrients to be resupplied to ...
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What's killing Alaska's whales? 21.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Whales are dying at an alarming rate in the western Gulf of Alaska, and federal investigators say they're determined to find out why.
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Food Waste And Beef Fat Will Be Making Airplanes Soar 21.8.2015 NPR News
Biofuel producers are teaming up with farms, meatpackers and waste management companies to tap the gassy waste on farms to make renewable jet fuel and diesel for vehicles.
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Sea Lion Seizures, Toxic Algae and the Nightmare Scenario for the Oceans 15.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A sea lion on a Washington beach curls into a fetal position, shuddering. Then it contorts its neck, craning its head into the air, clearly in distress. NOAA researchers in Washington were horrified by this recent footage from Long Beach : "'A sea lion with his head arched back, he's basically having seizures,' said NOAA Fisheries Research Oceanographer Vera Trainer." The cause of the seizure? Domoic acid poisoning, caused by the sea lion's exposure to a massive, record-breaking bloom of the algae Pseudo-nitzschia that stretches from California to Alaska. Researchers have never seen a bloom this size. The chains of algae they found on a recent research trip "looked like it was grown in a lab." Trainer told Reuters : "It's the longest lasting, highest toxicity and densest bloom that we've ever seen." So what's causing the bloom? Scientists are still studying it, but there are at least two candidates: increased ocean acidification and warming oceans. Plankton, including algae, form the base of the ocean's ...
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Toxic blue-green algae pose increasing threat to nation's drinking, recreational water 14.8.2015 Environmental News Network
A report concludes that blooms of toxic cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, are a poorly monitored and underappreciated risk to recreational and drinking water quality in the United States, and may increasingly pose a global health threat.
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'Blob' algae poisons drinking water 13.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Have you heard of "The Blob" that has been invading coastal areas in the Pacific Ocean? The Blob is what scientists are calling areas of water in the Bering Sea, the Gulf of Alaska and off the coast of California that have been running 3 to 5 degrees above normal. This water is affecting weather patterns in the United States and marine life around the globe. And it could also be causing another problem in the Pacific: algae.
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Toxic algae blooms befoul U.S. drinking water 12.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
CNN's Jennifer Gray says toxic algae blooms are wiping out marine life and contaminating drinking water in the United States.
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Protein Goes Green: Can Algae Become The Next Soy? 12.8.2015 NPR News
Some companies think microalgae could be the alternative protein of the future, but can it top plant proteins?
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U.S. needs a strong Renewable Fuel Standard 11.8.2015 MinnPost
As a fifth generation farmer, I see the crucial role that the American agricultural community plays in helping the entire nation to succeed every day. Hardworking farmers in the heartland of this country are benefiting others through their sacrifices, by stimulating our economy and spurring job growth in America. America’s Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), under its original intent, challenges farmers and workers in the agricultural industry to produce more renewable fuel like ethanol. It calls on folks to work just a bit harder, and for good reason: More renewable fuel means our country is that much safer and less dependent on foreign oil, and we continue to see rising employment here at home rather than ship jobs overseas. The RFS also aims to decrease greenhouse gas emissions so that we, and our children, can work and play outdoors breathing cleaner air. The renewable fuel industry powered a strong comeback in rural economies across the nation, allowing farmers to gain financial stability after economic ...
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Cheaper oil forces South Africa to rework biofuels subsidy 11.8.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
By Wendell Roelf CAPE TOWN (Reuters) - South Africa's biofuels funding incentive is being revamped over concerns that it is unaffordable after a halving of global crude oil prices over the past year, officials said on Tuesday. A net importer of crude, Africa’s most advanced economy wants biofuels initially to meet 2 percent, or around 400 million litres, of the country’s annual fuel consumption to wean itself off oil imports and improve the trade balance. “There is a fiscal risk posed by the subsidy under the circumstances of a declining crude oil price,” said Ompi Aphane, deputy director general of energy policy and planning.
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Appeals court upholds new water quality standards for rivers 11.8.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A coalition of cities, along with a group of soybean growers, had asked the court to halt the new rules aimed at curbing excessive algae growth.
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Stinking mats of seaweed piling up on Caribbean beaches 10.8.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — The picture-perfect beaches and turquoise waters that people expect on their visits to the Caribbean are increasingly being fouled by mats of decaying seaweed that attract biting sand fleas and smell like rotten ...
Stinking mats of seaweed piling up on Caribbean beaches 10.8.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
Clumps of the brownish seaweed known as sargassum have long washed up on Caribbean coastlines, but researchers say the algae blooms have exploded in extent and frequency in recent years.
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History of Agriculture Revealed 7.8.2015 Environmental News Network
Open any history book and you’re likely to find that the practice of agriculture was invented 12,000 years ago in the Levant, an area in the Middle East that was home to some of the first human civilizations. But a new discovery recently made in Northern Israel seems to have shattered the myth on the advent of agriculture, offering up exciting evidence that trial plant cultivation, what we call agriculture, began far earlier – some 23,000-years-ago.
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Are insecticides more toxic than we think? 6.8.2015 Environmental News Network
Insecticides that are sprayed in orchards and fields across North America may be more toxic to spiders than scientists previously believed. A McGill research team reached this conclusion after looking at changes in the behaviour of individual Bronze Jumping Spiders both before and after exposure to Phosmet, a widely used broad spectrum insecticide. It is a finding with far-reaching implications for agricultural production and ecosystem health.
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Toxic algae grows even worse; crab-fishing closure doubles in size 5.8.2015 Seattle Times: Business & Technology
A coastal ribbon of microscopic algae, up to 40 miles wide and 650 feet deep, is flourishing amid unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures. Shellfish managers have doubled the area off Washington’s coast that is closed to Dungeness crab fishing, after finding marine toxins in tested crabmeat.
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