User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Dec 02 2016 05:40 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Bioenergy grass can withstand freezing temperatures 30.11.2016 Environmental News Network
March 2012 was unusually warm. Biomass crops around the Midwest were well established and thriving. But when a late frost came in mid-April, all of that changed.“When I went out in the morning, I was just shocked,” says University of Illinois agronomist D.K. Lee. “All the grasses were covered in frost. By noon, Miscanthus and switchgrass had turned black. The only plant that was untouched was prairie cordgrass.”
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Trump faces dilemma as U.S. oil reels from record biofuels targets 28.11.2016 Yahoo: Business
By Chris Prentice NEW YORK (Reuters) - The Obama administration signed its final plan for renewable fuel use in the United States last week, leaving an oil industry reeling from the most aggressive biofuel targets yet as President-elect Donald Trump takes over. The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program, signed into law by President George W. Bush, is one of the country's most controversial energy policies. The policy was designed to cut greenhouse gas emissions, reduce U.S. reliance on oil imports and boost rural economies that provide the crops for ...
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California's Dungeness crab season facing second year of troubles due to algae toxin 24.11.2016 LA Times: Commentary

State health officials Wednesday recommended an indefinite delay of the commercial crabbing season for Dungeness along a more than 200-mile stretch of Northern California owing to a toxin from algae blooms.

The recommendation from California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment marks...

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Soylent Says This Novel Ingredient Caused All Those "Gastrointestinal Issues" 17.11.2016 Mother Jones
Soylent.com Homepage Video from Soylent on Vimeo . Soylent is Silicon Valley's bluntest and blandest attempt to "disrupt the food industry."   The company's flagship beige goo (to use New Yorker writer Lizzie Widdicombe's apt phrase ) demonstrates that "food really is made of chemicals; it is reducible, we can build it back up; we can change it, and we can make it better," Rob Rhinehart, the company's founder, insists in the above video. But now Soylent has been forced to admit that cracking the mysteries of human nutrition might be trickier than Rhinehart knew when that video was released in 2012. It all started in mid-October, when Soylent found itself disrupted by an age-old food industry scourge : a food safety scare . The company acknowledged that some of its customers had "experienced gastrointestinal issues after consuming Soylent Bars"—a delicate way to describe those complaints . To its credit, the meal-replacement upstart quickly recalled those bars . Two weeks later, it stopped sales of one of ...
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Why do seabirds eat plastic? 15.11.2016 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Heartbreaking stories of seabirds eating plastic — and the accompanying horrible images— are everywhere, but now scientists are an important question: Why do seabirds eat plastic in the first place? And why are some more likely to have bellies full of plastic than others?The answer, it turns out, lies in a compound called dimethyl sulfide, or DMS, which emits a “chemical scream” that some birds associate with food. When seabirds find chunks of plastic bobbing in the water, they gobble them up, not realizing that they’ve just consumed something very dangerous.
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Why do seabirds eat plastic? 15.11.2016 Environmental News Network
Heartbreaking stories of seabirds eating plastic — and the accompanying horrible images— are everywhere, but now scientists are an important question: Why do seabirds eat plastic in the first place? And why are some more likely to have bellies full of plastic than others?The answer, it turns out, lies in a compound called dimethyl sulfide, or DMS, which emits a “chemical scream” that some birds associate with food. When seabirds find chunks of plastic bobbing in the water, they gobble them up, not realizing that they’ve just consumed something very dangerous.
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A plane full of people just flew cross country on wood-based fuel made by a Colorado company 15.11.2016 Denver Post: Business
Alaska Airlines flew a commercial flight on Monday from Seattle to Washington, D.C., using jet fuel made out of alcohol derived from wood scraps.
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Biofuel from logging scraps powers Alaska Airlines jet on cross-country flight 15.11.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

An Alaska Airlines flight from Seattle to Washington, DC, Monday morning was powered with a jet fuel blend containing 20 percent renewable biofuel made from the leftovers of Pacific Northwest logging. The biofuel remains much more expensive than regular jet fuel derived from oil.
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Why seabirds love to gobble plastic floating in the ocean 11.11.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
New evidence suggests that for a lot of birds, plastic actually smells like food. The reason for that involves a common kind of algae floating in the ocean and a "chemical scream."
When seabirds smell plastic in the ocean, they think it's time to eat 11.11.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Seabirds mistakenly eat plastic debris in the ocean not just because it looks like food, but because it smells like it.

When mealtime comes around, many species of ocean-faring birds, including albatrosses and petrels, follow their noses to the smell of dying algae, a sure sign that tasty krill...

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Why Seabirds Love To Gobble Plastic Floating In The Ocean 11.11.2016 NPR News
New evidence suggests that for a lot of birds, plastic actually smells like food. The reason for that involves a common kind of algae floating in the ocean and a "chemical scream."
Algal blooms lead to ‘impaired’ designation for Lake Erie 10.11.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The state of Michigan is designating its section of Lake Erie as an impaired waterway because of damage to fish and other wildlife caused by harmful algal blooms, officials told The Associated Press on Thursday. The declaration affects only the section of the lake under Michigan’s jurisdiction, which is less […]
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Low-carbon aviation fuel soars onward 10.11.2016 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
You may be surprised to learn that air travel is already efficient. In fact, a flight between New York and Los Angeles achieves the equivalent of about 80 miles per gallon per passenger.Airplane manufacturers, such as Boeing and Airbus, prioritized reducing fuel consumption because jet fuel is the No. 1 expense for airlines, and they have achieved great success in doing so. 
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Growing A Bioeconomy -- Flanders To Produce Fossil-Free Fuels, Chemicals, And Products 9.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"By 2050, around 50 percent of all chemicals produced will be biobased." --Dr. Wim Soetaert Biodegradable biobased products made without fossil-fuel feedstocks are showcased at the Biobased Europe Pilot Plant in Ghent, Belgium. The products include a laundry liquid and a hand soap made by Ecover, shower gels by Nivea and Sanex, a skin oil by Kneipp, and a window de-icer by Forever, as well as samples of the plant's biodiesel and bioethanol. Ghent, Belgium--A nonprofit public-private partnership called Flanders Biobased Valley (FBBV) and several key allies hope to transform the Flanders region of Belgium into the hub of a new European center of biobased economic activity. More than €500 million has already been invested in the region's bioeconomy. In a biobased economy, fuels and chemicals are produced from plant-derived materials rather than petroleum or other fossil fuels. The term "bioeconomy" encompasses agriculture and forestry-based processors and their products, such as food and paper, as well as ...
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Here Are the Races to Watch If You Care About Global Warming 7.11.2016 Mother Jones
The climate didn't get much attention in this year's debates, but Tuesday's election will still have a major consequences for the fight against global warming. Donald Trump thinks climate change is a hoax ; he's pledged to withdraw from the historic Paris climate accord and to repeal President Barack Obama's Clean Power Plan , which is intended to cut greenhouse gas emissions from coal plants. Hillary Clinton has said she will continue Obama's climate legacy and has called for installing half-a-billion solar panels by the end of her first term. The debate isn't restricted to the top of the ticket; there are a number of state races that will play a key role in determining US climate policy, along with a handful of ballot initiatives covering everything thing from rooftop solar to a proposed carbon tax. The situation in each state is unique. Some races—New Hampshire's Senate contest, for instance—feature two candidates who want to act on climate change. Others, such as West Virginia's gubernatorial ...
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Farmers Could Help Trump Win This Make-Or-Break State 4.11.2016 Mother Jones
As judgment day approaches, the most farm-intensive US state, Iowa, has emerged as a key prize. And the Donald Trump campaign is using a classic Iowa ag issue—a federal mandate that props up the production of ethanol from corn—as a pitchfork to wield at against his opponent. And the farm vote could be decisive. In a state with a population of 3.1 million , more than 210,000 people are emplyed on farms, according to the 2012 Census . As recently as Oct. 14, Democratic nominee Hilary Clinton had a 60 percent likelihood of defeating her Republican rival in the nation's number-one corn-growing state, according to analysis by the poll-tracking site FiveThirtyEight. But since then, polls there have drifted decisively in the reality TV veteran's direction, and now his chances of defeating the former secretary of state in Iowa stand at 65.8 percent. And while winning Iowa is far from enough to push Trump to national victory, he absolutely needs to win the state to have any reasonable shot at the presidency.  His ...
Groups: Work curbing Lake Erie algae need to target hotspots 31.10.2016 Seattle Times: Local

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — The algae bloom in parts of Lake Erie this summer didn’t come close to matching the record-breaking one from a year ago that covered an area roughly the size of New York City. That’s because the spring and early summer months this year lacked the rainfall that has in recent years […]
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Toxins from freshwater algae found in San Francisco Bay shellfish 27.10.2016 Environmental News Network
Scientists have detected high levels of a toxin produced by freshwater algae in mussels from San Francisco Bay. Although shellfish harvested from California's coastal waters are monitored for toxins produced by marine algae, they are not routinely tested for this freshwater toxin, called microcystin.The toxin, which causes liver damage, is produced by a type of cyanobacteria (also known as blue-green algae) that thrives in warm, nutrient-rich water conditions. It has been found in many lakes and rivers in California, including the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, which flow into the San Francisco Bay Delta, and in several Bay Area lakes.
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Big Oil Companies Reap Windfall From Ethanol Rules 27.10.2016 Wall St. Journal: US Business
Environmental regulations designed to boost the amount of ethanol blended into the U.S. gasoline supply have inadvertently become a multibillion-dollar windfall for some of the world’s biggest oil companies.
The Ethanol Effect 27.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Not all Americans know what that E-10 sticker on the gas pump means. A new documentary "The Ethanol Effect" which can be seen on PBS or online is a welcome addition to the sometimes technical news coverage of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Passed in 2005 and expanded in 2007, the RFS mandate for biofuel consumption has driven a massive shift in our agriculture system to produce energy. This has harmed our food, water, biodiversity, grasslands, and forests - and not just in the United States. Host David Biello speaks to many stakeholders who are on different sides of this issue. But I do wish they had investigated some of the claims a little more. For example, one speaker claimed that corn ethanol provides better air quality which is simply not true . The testimony of the Nebraska farmers was particularly compelling, because while I do oppose the corn ethanol mandate and advocate for reforming the RFS, I don't blame U.S. farmers for growing corn ethanol. The government set the farm and energy policies ...
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