User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Jan 15 2017 05:25 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Military's shift away from oil clashes with Trump's promises 14.1.2017 Technology

Military's shift away from oil clashes with Trump's promisesAt a sprawling desert base, a Marine recharged his radio's batteries simply by walking, while nearby fellow troops examined a rocket artillery system and a drone — both powered by the sun. Navy and Marine ...


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Military's shift away from oil clashes with Trump's promises 14.1.2017 AP National
TWENTYNINE PALMS, Calif. (AP) -- At a sprawling desert base, a Marine recharged his radio's batteries simply by walking, while nearby fellow troops examined a rocket artillery system and a drone - both powered by the sun....
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Military’s shift away from oil clashes with Trump’s promises 14.1.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

TWENTYNINE PALMS, Calif. (AP) — At a sprawling desert base, a Marine recharged his radio’s batteries simply by walking, while nearby fellow troops examined a rocket artillery system and a drone — both powered by the sun. Navy and Marine Corps brass, accompanied by green energy executives, showcased the energy-harnessing knee braces and other innovations […]
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Warmer West Coast ocean conditions linked to increased risk of toxic shellfish 11.1.2017 Climate Change News - ENN
Hazardous levels of domoic acid, a natural toxin that accumulates in shellfish, have been linked to warmer ocean conditions in waters off Oregon and Washington for the first time by a NOAA-supported research team, led by Oregon State University scientists.Domoic acid, produced by certain types of marine algae, can accumulate in shellfish, fish and other marine animals. Consuming enough of the toxin can be harmful or even fatal. Public health agencies and seafood managers closely monitor toxin levels and impose harvest closures where necessary to ensure that seafood remains safe to eat. NOAA is supporting research and new tools to help seafood industry managers stay ahead of harmful algae events that are increasing in frequency, intensity and scope.
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Warmer Oceans Could Boost The Toxins In Your Shellfish Dinner 10.1.2017 NPR Health Science
A new study finds a link between warming waters and a dangerous neurotoxin that builds up in species like Dungeness crab, clams and mussels — and harms us if we eat them.
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Species diversity reduces chances of crop failure in algal biofuel systems 9.1.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
ANN ARBOR—When growing algae in outdoor ponds as a next-generation biofuel, a naturally diverse mix of species will help reduce the chance of crop failure, according to a federally funded study by University of Michigan researchers.
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Faye Flam: Drunken monkeys and the evolution of boozing 8.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Nothing rings in the new year like a solution of bubbling, neurotoxic ethanol. Humanity’s longstanding relationship with alcohol poses an evolutionary puzzle: Surely natural selection would weed out those of our ancestors with a taste for something that clouds judgment, slows reflexes, dulls the senses and impairs balance. Animals in such a state would likely be the first picked off by predators, if they hadn’t already fallen out of a tree. And yet humans all over the world drink ethanol in vari...
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Brazil's Petrobras to Sell Noncore Assets for $587 Million 29.12.2016 Wall St. Journal: US Business
Brazilian state-run oil company Petróleo Brasiliero SA on Wednesday, said it agreed to sell certain noncore business assets for $587 million, amid its efforts to raise cash and reduce debts.
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Rex Tillerson Supposedly Shifted Exxon Mobil’s Climate Position. Except He Really Didn’t. 26.12.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In December 2006, Exxon Mobil Corp. convened a two-day summit of environmental and ethics experts at a rural retreat near the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia. It was nearly a year after Rex Tillerson took over as chief executive, and a month after Democrats had claimed a new majority in Congress. The world’s largest publicly traded oil company found itself in a bind. For decades, Exxon had funded far-right think tanks that seeded doubt over the scientific consensus on climate change. Under Tillerson’s predecessor, Lee Raymond, the company had aligned itself heavily with Republicans, funneling 95 percent of its political donations to the party from 2000 to 2004, according to Steve Coll’s 2012 book, Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power. Raymond took an aggressive stance against climate science: “It is highly unlikely that the temperature in the middle of the next century will be affected whether policies are enacted now or 20 years from now,” he said in a 1997 speech. Tillerson and ...
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Earliest evidence discovered of plants cooked in ancient pottery 19.12.2016 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
A team of international scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has uncovered the earliest direct evidence of humans processing plants for food found anywhere in the world.Researchers at the Organic Geochemistry Unit in the University of Bristol's School of Chemistry, working with colleagues at Sapienza, University of Rome and the Universities of Modena and Milan, studied unglazed pottery dating from more than 10,000 years ago, from two sites in the Libyan Sahara.
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California biodiesel companies hunker down - and hope 17.12.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Jennifer Case, president of San Diego-based New Leaf Biofuel, is feeling a bit tense these days.

Her 31-employee company, which recycles cooking oil and converts it to diesel fuel, is about to enter the new year without a much-needed federal tax credit, which is in limbo on Capitol Hill.

“You have...

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Trump Sends Mixed Signals on Ethanol Mandate 17.12.2016 Wall St. Journal: Policy
As a candidate Donald Trump backed the use of ethanol and other biofuels in gasoline, but his EPA pick opposes those federal rules, setting up high-stakes jockeying across several industries on what will become of the mandate.
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Study: Maximizing grain yields won't meet future African needs 13.12.2016 Environmental News Network
Maximizing cereal crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa would still fail to meet the region’s skyrocketing grain demand by 2050, according to a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Wageningen University and multiple African institutions.
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Tongass Forest Plan Amendment supports sustainable communities and viable economies - Amended plan focuses on transition to young growth harvest and renewable energy development 9.12.2016 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
KETCHIKAN, Alaska, December 9, 2016 – M. Earl Stewart, the Forest Supervisor for the Tongass National Forest, Alaska Region, has signed the final Record of Decision (ROD) for the amended Tongass National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan (Tongass Forest Plan). The Final ROD documents the Forest Supervisor’s rationale for approving the Tongass Forest Plan Amendment. The Tongass Forest Plan Amendment will become effective in 30 days.
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EPA's National Lakes Assessment Finds Nutrient Pollution is Widespread in Lakes 9.12.2016 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released the results of a national assessment showing that nutrient pollution is widespread in the nation’s lakes, with 4 in 10 lakes suffering from too much nitrogen and phosphorus.
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Utah air, environmental regulators hope they can bank on guv's proposed budget 9.12.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Environmental regulators in Utah are hoping for a brighter 2017 after reading the governor’s proposed budget. Gov. Gary Herbert’s budget suggests dedicating $1.45 million next year to buy new air quality monitors and upgrade old, increasingly unreliable equipment. The budget also recommends assigning $123,000 for algal bloom response in the wake of this summer’s massive toxic algal bloom on Utah Lake. The Utah Division of Air Quality (DAQ) requested $2.2 million from the Legislature this year,... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Renewable Fuels: Good Policy And Good Politics For Democrats 7.12.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The election result that shocked the nation are causing Democrats to ask themselves how they did so poorly with working class voters in the middle of the country. There are many answers to the question, but as a veteran who has worked to elect progressive leaders from across the country, let me offer one step that Democrats could take immediately to demonstrate their commitment to economic growth, national security, and climate change in a way that actually resonates in the heartland. This requires only that lawmakers fully embrace policies like the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) that support homegrown biofuels. As a veteran, I've seen my fellow troops risk, and lose, their lives in places that are of strategic importance to the United States only because of oil. I've also met many who have returned home and are producing biofuels that grow local economies, increase our national security, and reduce carbon emissions. They are able to do this work because the RFS requires oil companies to blend biofuels ...
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Bioenergy grass can withstand freezing temperatures 30.11.2016 Environmental News Network
March 2012 was unusually warm. Biomass crops around the Midwest were well established and thriving. But when a late frost came in mid-April, all of that changed.“When I went out in the morning, I was just shocked,” says University of Illinois agronomist D.K. Lee. “All the grasses were covered in frost. By noon, Miscanthus and switchgrass had turned black. The only plant that was untouched was prairie cordgrass.”
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Trump faces dilemma as U.S. oil reels from record biofuels targets 28.11.2016 Yahoo: Business
By Chris Prentice NEW YORK (Reuters) - The Obama administration signed its final plan for renewable fuel use in the United States last week, leaving an oil industry reeling from the most aggressive biofuel targets yet as President-elect Donald Trump takes over. The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program, signed into law by President George W. Bush, is one of the country's most controversial energy policies. The policy was designed to cut greenhouse gas emissions, reduce U.S. reliance on oil imports and boost rural economies that provide the crops for ...
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California's Dungeness crab season facing second year of troubles due to algae toxin 24.11.2016 LA Times: Commentary

State health officials Wednesday recommended an indefinite delay of the commercial crabbing season for Dungeness along a more than 200-mile stretch of Northern California owing to a toxin from algae blooms.

The recommendation from California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment marks...

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