User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Feb 06 2016 20:30 IST RSS 2.0
 
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After Cruz Win, How Important Is Candidate Stance On Ethanol? 6.2.2016 NPR: Saturday
Ted Cruz won the Iowa Republican Caucuses on a platform that included opposing ethanol, a key Iowa industry. Does this mean future presidential candidates won't have to support the corn fuel?
Loss of wild flowers matches pollinator decline 4.2.2016 Environmental News Network
The first Britain-wide assessment of the value of wild flowers as food for pollinators shows that decreasing resources mirror the decline of pollinating insects.
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Traverse City students' algae project to be sent into space 4.2.2016 Science / Technology News

An experiment developed by students at a Traverse City high school and contained in a tube roughly the size of a pencil will be sent into space.

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Is Oyster Aquaculture Good for the Bay? 5 Questions for Dr. Ashley Smyth 3.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The EPA has put the Chesapeake Bay on a low-pollution diet, limiting the total amount of pollutants, such as nutrients and sediment. One surprising ally in the battle to save the Bay is the oyster. I interviewed Dr. Ashley Smyth, a Scientist at the VA Institute of Marine Science about her work on oysters and how they help cleanse the waters. Question 1: How exactly do oysters remove pollutants from the water? Answer: Oysters remove pollutants as they feed. Oysters, like clams and mussels are filtering feeding bivalves, so as they feed they suck material in the water, like sediment and algae out. This action makes the water clearer. In addition, oysters can help remove nutrients by incorporating the nutrients in algae into their shell and meat. Whatever the oyster doesn't use ends up in the sediments as biodeposits, packages of waste. Microbes and bugs that live in the sediment use the biodeposts for energy and transform some of the nutrients. Microbes can actually take the nitrogen, which is a pollutant, ...
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Happy Iowa Aftershocks 3.2.2016 Wall St. Journal: Opinion
Encouraging political news on ethanol and immigration.
Cruz Win Chips Away at Ethanol's Clout 3.2.2016 Wall St. Journal: Policy
Sen. Ted Cruz’s victory in the Iowa caucuses struck a blow against a seemingly unshakable rule of presidential politics: A candidate can’t win Iowa without enthusiastically supporting the federal ethanol mandate.
Cruz's Iowa victory could be big blow to Big Corn 2.2.2016 Yahoo: Top Stories
By Chris Prentice NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz's victory on Monday in corn-rich Iowa could represent a major blow to the nation's controversial biofuels program, reflecting its waning influence over politicians even in the U.S. farm heartland. The conservative senator from Texas and outspoken opponent of the Renewable Fuel Standard, or RFS, upset Republican front-runner Donald Trump in the Iowa caucuses, the first of the state-by-state battles to pick nominees for the Nov. 8 election to succeed President Barack Obama. Cruz won with 28 percent of the vote, compared with 24 percent for Trump, a billionaire businessman.. The result was a setback for corn farmers in the country's biggest ethanol-producing state, who have lobbied hard to protect the policy from being dismantled after more than a decade.
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Slurp, Baby, Slurp: Trump Supports Ethanol Production in Iowa 1.2.2016 Truthout - All Articles
As the "lamestream"  media , late-night  talk show hosts , and Sarah Palin impersonator-in-chief  Tina Fey  lapped up the former Alaska governor's first remarks to Donald Trump's "right-wingin' bitter-clingin'" supporters, one of her most hilarious lines didn't get the attention it deserved. Some Republicans are "even whispering they're ready to throw in for Hillary over Trump because they can't afford to see the status quo go,"  John McCain's 2008 running mate  said. "Otherwise, they won't be able to be slurping off the gravy train that's been feeding them all these years. They don't want that to end." Seriously? Iowa, home to the first official contests for the major parties' nominations, is the nation's  top ethanol producer . Saluting its corn-flavored gravy train is a rite of passage for presidential candidates courting Iowa voters like the ones at the Ames rally Palin was addressing. And Trump, like every presidential candidate other than the libertarian-tinged Republicans  Ted Cruz  and Rand Paul, ...
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Why is the issue of ethanol dogging Ted Cruz in Iowa? 1.2.2016 Washington Post: Politics
Why is the issue of ethanol dogging Ted Cruz in Iowa?
Kill Iowa's caucuses, aka a subsidy for its ethanol-dependent political establishment 30.1.2016 Chicago Tribune: Opinion
First, kill the Iowa caucuses. Please note: I didn't say, "Kill the Iowans." I like Iowans and I like Iowa. But we need to get Iowa's boot off our neck. That may be misunderstood, as well. You see, we're not under the heel of all Iowans. If we were, that'd actually be better because that ...
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Here's One Climate Issue Ted Cruz Actually Gets Right 27.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story was produced and originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. With the Iowa caucuses just a week away, Ted Cruz is duking it out with Donald Trump. But Cruz is also taking a beating from a less well-known opponent: the biofuel industry. Apparently the ethanol folks don't like Ted Cruz... pic.twitter.com/3OEYBUrOmY — David Biello (@dbiello) January 21, 2016 The problem is Cruz's stance on the Renewable Fuel Standard, a federal mandate that requires fuels made from corn, sugarcane, and other biological sources to be mixed into the nation's gasoline supply. The most prominent of these fuels is ethanol made from corn. Cruz wants to abolish the RFS (along with all government mandates and subsidies for energy, including for fossil fuels and renewables). Last week in New Hampshire he described the RFS as yet another way in which the government is "picking winners and losers." That position sets him apart from the other Iowa front-runners, ...
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Here's One Issue Ted Cruz Actually Gets Right 26.1.2016 Mother Jones
Here's One Issue Ted Cruz Actually Gets Right That position sets him apart from the other Iowa front-runners, Republican and Democrat alike. Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have both expressed support for the RFS. Donald Trump recently said wants to increase the mandate. Cruz's position could be a major liability in Iowa, where the RFS has become one of the most important corn-related federal programs and is a major fixture in the state's politics. Iowa produces by far the most corn-based ethanol and thus arguably benefits more than any other state from the RFS. Last week, Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad (R) called for Cruz's defeat in the caucuses, specifically citing Cruz's "anti-renewable fuel stand." (Branstad's son works for the ethanol trade group America's Renewable Future, the organization in the Twitter photo above.) Last week, Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley (R), a longtime proponent of the RFS, said he agreed with Branstad's criticism of Cruz. Of course, Iowa Republicans aren't all single-issue voters, ...
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River commission seeking volunteers to keep track of algae 25.1.2016 Washington Post
River commission seeking volunteers to keep track of algae
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Buzzards Bay being impacted by climate change 23.1.2016 Environmental News Network
An analysis of long-term, water quality monitoring data reveals that climate change is already having an impact on ecosystems in the coastal waters of Buzzards Bay, Mass. The impacts relate to how nitrogen pollution affects coastal ecosystems.Utilizing 22 years of data collected by a network of citizen scientists, researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and their colleagues at the Buzzards Bay National Estuary Program, the Buzzards Bay Coalition, and the Marine Biological Laboratory found that average summertime temperatures in embayments throughout Buzzards Bay warmed by almost 2 degrees Celsius—roughly 4 degrees Fahrenheit."That is a rapid temperature increase for marine life," said Jennie Rheuban, a research associate at WHOI and lead author of the paper published January 15, 2016, in the journal Biogeosciences. "For some species, a single degree Fahrenheit change can mean the difference between a comfortable environment and one where they can no longer ...
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Buzzards Bay being impacted by climate change according to a Woods Hole study 23.1.2016 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
An analysis of long-term, water quality monitoring data reveals that climate change is already having an impact on ecosystems in the coastal waters of Buzzards Bay, Mass. The impacts relate to how nitrogen pollution affects coastal ecosystems.Utilizing 22 years of data collected by a network of citizen scientists, researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and their colleagues at the Buzzards Bay National Estuary Program, the Buzzards Bay Coalition, and the Marine Biological Laboratory found that average summertime temperatures in embayments throughout Buzzards Bay warmed by almost 2 degrees Celsius—roughly 4 degrees Fahrenheit."That is a rapid temperature increase for marine life," said Jennie Rheuban, a research associate at WHOI and lead author of the paper published January 15, 2016, in the journal Biogeosciences. "For some species, a single degree Fahrenheit change can mean the difference between a comfortable environment and one where they can no longer ...
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The spectacle of Donald Trump, Sarah Palin, Ted Cruz and corn 22.1.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Sarah Palin is really falling apart. “Trump’s candidacy, it has exposed not just that tragic, the ramifications of that betrayal of a transformation of our country, but too, he has exposed the complicity on both sides of the aisle that has enabled it, OK?” Palin told the crowd at her big announcement endorsing Donald Trump. […]
'Great Green Fleet' using biofuels deployed by U.S. Navy 21.1.2016 Yahoo: US National
The U.S. Navy formally deployed its "Great Green Fleet" on Wednesday, sending warships powered by alternative energy to conduct operations in the Pacific three years after controversy over the price of developing new fuels provoked a fight in Congress. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack kicked off the deployment in a ceremony at Naval Air Station North Island near San Diego, saying the use of biofuels would improve the Navy's operational flexibility while boosting the U.S. rural economy. The Navy's focus on developing alternative fuel sources comes despite a 70 percent drop in oil prices since it first tested its Great Green Fleet in exercises in ...
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Majority of Presidential Candidates Support Controversial Fuel Standards 21.1.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump expressed his desire to maintain the Renewable Fuel Standard Jan. 19, 2016 at the 10th annual Iowa Renewable Fuels Summit in Altoona, Iowa. Renewable fuels and the controversial standards surrounding them are repeat hot topics of debate during the Iowa caucuses, and the current crop of presidential candidates are not cowering away from the issue. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said Tuesday at the 10th annual Iowa Renewable Fuels conference that he supports the notion to maintain the standard, a declaration that must have boded well with many citizens of a state with 41 corn ethanol plants in attendance. "As president, I will encourage congress to be cautious in attempting to charge and change any part of the (Renewable Fuel Standard)," Trump said at the summit, closely accompanied by his script. "Energy independence is a requirement for America to become great again." Three other candidates attended the summit as well -- former Sen. Rick ...
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The ethanol monster follows Ted Cruz to New Hampshire 21.1.2016 Washington Post
The ethanol monster follows Ted Cruz to New Hampshire
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Algae. The Surprising Key to Saving Humanity? 20.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Somewhere between three and four billion years ago, algae first appeared. This may not sound exciting, but it paved the way for life on earth and could ultimately point to part of the solution to today's energy crisis. Algae, along with other early organisms like cyaonobacteria, is photosynthetic. This means that it's able to capture carbon and breath out oxygen in return. And we need oxygen to breathe. During the following billions of years, more photosynthetic organisms developed: plants. The interesting thing about plants is that they convert CO2 into chemical energy -- glucose -- and produce water and oxygen. So basically plants do what we're struggling to achieve, in a world threatened by climate change: they capture CO2, produce energy and keep our air clean and breathable. So why can't we do the same thing? Well, we can't "do" photosynthesis, but we can use it. How it All Started At Wageningen University in the Netherlands, a crazy assistant professor, Bert Hamelers, thought that it should be ...
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