User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
Last updated: Jan 31 2015 02:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Biofuels Not All They're Cracked Up To Be, Report Finds 30.1.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Most Of Hawaii's Coral Recover From Mass Bleaching Event 30.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
HONOLULU (AP) -- Coral rely on algae for food and their survival. So when the stress of warmer-than-average ocean temperatures prompted many of Hawaii's corals to expel algae last year - a phenomenon called bleaching because coral lose their color when they do this - many were worried they might die. Now the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources says most of the bleached corals have recovered. It plans to announce the result of its coral surveys on Thursday. Even so, scientists say the experience weakened the coral, making them more likely to get sick. It's also going to be harder for them to withstand warm temperatures in the future. The incident is a blow to the state's fragile reefs, which are already under pressure from runoff from development, overfishing and recreational use of the ocean. Coral reefs are a critical part of the ecosystem, and their health is vital to the ocean environment. Coral cover just one-tenth of the ocean floor but are home to 25 percent of known marine species. ...
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Biofuels Are Not a Green Alternative to Fossil Fuels 29.1.2015 WRI Stories
This blog post was originally published in The Guardian on January 29, 2015. Powering cars with corn and burning wood to make electricity might seem like a way to lessen dependence on fossil fuels and help solve the climate crisis. But although some forms of bioenergy can play a helpful role, dedicating land specifically for generating bioenergy is unwise. It uses land needed for food production and carbon storage, it requires large areas to generate just a small amount of fuel, and it won’t... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Jet Fuel from Algae? 29.1.2015 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study published in the journal Energy & Fuels. The researchers, led by Greg O’Neil of Western Washington University and Chris Reddy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, exploited an unusual and untapped class of chemical compounds in the algae to synthesize two different fuel products, in parallel, from a single algae.
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Jet Fuel from Algae? 29.1.2015 Environmental News Network
A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study published in the journal Energy & Fuels. The researchers, led by Greg O’Neil of Western Washington University and Chris Reddy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, exploited an unusual and untapped class of chemical compounds in the algae to synthesize two different fuel products, in parallel, from a single algae.
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From the Concorde to Sci-Fi Climate Solutions 29.1.2015 Truthout.com
The interior of the Concorde aircraft at the Scotland Museum of Flight. (Photo: Magnus Hagdorn ) Touting "sci-fi climate solutions" - untested technologies not really scalable to the dimensions of our climate change crisis - dangerously delays the day when we actually reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The interior of the Concorde aircraft at the Scotland Museum of Flight. (Photo: Magnus Hagdorn ) Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this: They can’t be found in corporate media! Make a tax-deductible donation today. Touting "sci-fi climate solutions" - untested technologies not really scalable to the dimensions of our climate change crisis - dangerously delays the day when we actually reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Last week, I took my son to Scotland's Museum of Flight. Its proudest exhibit: a Concorde. To me, it looked stunningly futuristic. "How old," remarked my son, looking at the confusing array of pre-digital controls in the cockpit. Watching the accompanying video - "Past Dreams of the ...
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Why Dedicating Land to Bioenergy Won't Curb Climate Change 29.1.2015 WRI Stories
This post is part of WRI's blog series, Creating a Sustainable Food Future. The series explores strategies to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050. All pieces are based on research being conducted for the 2013-2015 World Resources Report. How does bioenergy contribute to a sustainable food and climate future? A new WRI paper finds bioenergy can play a modest role using wastes and other niche fuelstocks, but recommends against dedicating land to produce bioenergy. The lesson:... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Most of Hawaii's coral recover from mass bleaching 29.1.2015 AP National
HONOLULU (AP) -- Coral rely on algae for food and their survival....
Most of Hawaii's coral recover from mass bleaching 29.1.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
Most of Hawaii's coral recover from mass bleaching
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Avoiding Bioenergy Competition for Food Crops and Land 29.1.2015 WRI Stories
Installment 9 of Creating a Sustainable Food Future shows that any dedicated use of land for growing bioenergy inherently comes at the cost of not using that land for growing food or animal feed, or for storing carbon. It recommends several policy changes to phase out forms of bioenergy that use crops or that otherwise make dedicated use of land. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Algae lights up Hong Kong harbor 26.1.2015 CNN: Top Stories
The stunning photo shows a shimmering blue shoreline with the bright lights of Hong Kong in the distance.
Videos reveal rich upside-down world under polar ice 23.1.2015 New Scientist: News
A secret underwater world thrives on algal meadows that hang under the polar sea ice – now we get some of the first glimpses of ...
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Magnificent blue glow of Hong Kong seas also disturbing 23.1.2015 AP Top News
Eerie fluorescent blue patches of water glimmering off Hong Kong's seashore are magnificent, disturbing and potentially toxic, marine biologists say....
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Biofuel maker Gevo cuts staff to save cash 21.1.2015 Star Tribune: Business
The company cut staff at its Colorado headquarters, but no layoffs happened at its Luverne, Minn., isobutanol plant.
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Falling oil prices threaten electric cars 18.1.2015 Financial Times: Energy
Competition increases as petrol-fuelled cars become cheaper to run
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Toxic algae on Lake Washington shoreline could harm dogs 18.1.2015 Seattle Times: Local
The Associated Press
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European study shows biofuel production can increase with low impacts 16.1.2015 Environmental News Network
EU countries could increase their production of biofuels with a minimum impact on the environment, Utrecht University scientists concluded in a study published on Tuesday (13 January). Biofuels are the main green alternative to fossil fuels used in transport, but they compete with feed crops that share the same agricultural land.As a consequence, forests are being turned into farmland to increase the terrestrial surface for planting more food crops, a phenomenon known as indirect land use change (ILUC). 
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Blooming algae may be changing lakes for the worse — and possibly forever 15.1.2015 MinnPost
A new study of noxious blue-green algae suggests that their summertime blooms may be on the rise not only because of changing climate conditions and continued fertilizer runoff, but also because these phytoplankton have a special gift for self-perpetuation: an ability to make use of phosphorus deposits buried long ago in lake-bottom sediments. After a period of decline following cleanup efforts that began in the 1970s, concern over cyanobacteria blooms has been rising for a decade or so, driven by beach closures and other examples of their threats to groundwater quality and the overall health of lakes. There are public-health risks as well — the toxins they produce can be harmful to people and pets as well as wildlife. Last month, Scientific American reported on investigations of a possible link between frequent algal blooms and high incidence of  amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease. But the new findings carry important implications for places far beyond those where bad blooms ...
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Access to water closed at Magnuson Park dog off-leash area 15.1.2015 Seattle Times: Local
Seattle Parks and Recreation has temporarily closed access to the water at Magnuson Park’s dogs off-leash area because of concerns about toxic algae.
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A Slew Of Green Energy Progress Could Be Made During Obama's Visit To India 11.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Arshad Mohammed GANDHINAGAR, India, Jan 11 (Reuters) - There could be progress on U.S.-India civil nuclear cooperation, solar power and climate change when U.S. President Barack Obama visits India in two weeks, U.S. officials said on Sunday. While stressing there were no guarantees that some of the most vexing economic issues between India and the United States would be resolved, the officials said some agreements were conceivable. "We are working on the civil nuclear liability issue," a senior State Department official told reporters traveling with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to the home state of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. "The goal is to have very concrete and tangible things that we can show forward movement on when President Obama and Prime Minister Modi meet, including on climate change," he said. Obama's visit to India and trips by Kerry and other U.S. senior officials aim to woo India as a strategic partner and to win greater access to the vast Indian market of 1.2 ...
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