User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-Independent
Category: Multi-Modal Transportation :: Bicycles
Last updated: May 25 2015 18:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,335    
Portland takes a car lane and makes it a mile-long pop-up park 22.5.2015 TreeHugger
Decades ago a prescient Portland mayor tore down a freeway to make a riverside park in the heart of Portland. Now transportation wonks are taking a traffic lane to expand that park with a pop-up ped and bike lane.
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Tongue in cheek advice for bicycle safety 18.5.2015 TreeHugger
Follow these simple rules and everyone will be safe, happy and comfortable coexisting with cars on the road.
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Stressed at work? Commute by bike. 14.5.2015 TreeHugger
There's so much evidence piling up that investing in cycling benefits everyone.
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Research says bike share has a rosy (digital) future 13.5.2015 TreeHugger
A whopping 850 cities have a bike share program, conferring health and happiness benefits on city residents. A review of the research shows we'll need those benefits to keep up with city growth
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Cycling vs. Car Transportation 12.5.2015 Green Lifestyle and Sustainable Culture News - ENN
What's more expensive? Owning a car or a bicycle? Answer seems obvious doesn't it? But how much more expensive are cars compared to bicycles? First, we need to consider not only the actual cost of the vehicle, but the hidden costs which can be related to air pollution, climate change, travel routes, noise, road wear, health, congestion, and time. Lucky for us, researchers have compared the costs and according to a Lund University study, traveling by car is six times more expensive for society and individuals.
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Cycling vs. Car Transportation 12.5.2015 Global Health and Wellness News - ENN
What's more expensive? Owning a car or a bicycle? Answer seems obvious doesn't it? But how much more expensive are cars compared to bicycles? First, we need to consider not only the actual cost of the vehicle, but the hidden costs which can be related to air pollution, climate change, travel routes, noise, road wear, health, congestion, and time. Lucky for us, researchers have compared the costs and according to a Lund University study, traveling by car is six times more expensive for society and individuals.
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Cycling vs. Car Transportation 12.5.2015 Alternative Energy and Fuel News - ENN
What's more expensive? Owning a car or a bicycle? Answer seems obvious doesn't it? But how much more expensive are cars compared to bicycles? First, we need to consider not only the actual cost of the vehicle, but the hidden costs which can be related to air pollution, climate change, travel routes, noise, road wear, health, congestion, and time. Lucky for us, researchers have compared the costs and according to a Lund University study, traveling by car is six times more expensive for society and individuals.
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Cycling vs. Car Transportation 12.5.2015 Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability News - ENN
What's more expensive? Owning a car or a bicycle? Answer seems obvious doesn't it? But how much more expensive are cars compared to bicycles? First, we need to consider not only the actual cost of the vehicle, but the hidden costs which can be related to air pollution, climate change, travel routes, noise, road wear, health, congestion, and time. Lucky for us, researchers have compared the costs and according to a Lund University study, traveling by car is six times more expensive for society and individuals.
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Cycling vs. Car Transportation 12.5.2015 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
What's more expensive? Owning a car or a bicycle? Answer seems obvious doesn't it? But how much more expensive are cars compared to bicycles? First, we need to consider not only the actual cost of the vehicle, but the hidden costs which can be related to air pollution, climate change, travel routes, noise, road wear, health, congestion, and time. Lucky for us, researchers have compared the costs and according to a Lund University study, traveling by car is six times more expensive for society and individuals.
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Cycling vs. Car Transportation 12.5.2015 Climate Change News - ENN
What's more expensive? Owning a car or a bicycle? Answer seems obvious doesn't it? But how much more expensive are cars compared to bicycles? First, we need to consider not only the actual cost of the vehicle, but the hidden costs which can be related to air pollution, climate change, travel routes, noise, road wear, health, congestion, and time. Lucky for us, researchers have compared the costs and according to a Lund University study, traveling by car is six times more expensive for society and individuals.
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Cycling vs. Car Transportation 12.5.2015 Environmental News Network
What's more expensive? Owning a car or a bicycle? Answer seems obvious doesn't it? But how much more expensive are cars compared to bicycles? First, we need to consider not only the actual cost of the vehicle, but the hidden costs which can be related to air pollution, climate change, travel routes, noise, road wear, health, congestion, and time. Lucky for us, researchers have compared the costs and according to a Lund University study, traveling by car is six times more expensive for society and individuals.
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Let's Build the Cities of the Future 12.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW YORK -- Talk to any proud city resident and they'll tell you their town is like no other place on earth. Its food, weather, parks, architecture, place in history, politics and entertainment -- and, of course, its sports teams. What they don't always embrace with the same enthusiasm is the one thing they have in common with every city resident: their streets. Whether you're in New York or Nairobi, Mexico City or Manila, the street is the first and last place we visit each day, and the backdrop for everything in between. But despite this starring role in urban life, too many streets worldwide are treated like bit players -- smothered in traffic, difficult to walk and bike around, bad for business and harmful to public health. Whether loved, ignored or squandered, cities are defined by their streets. While they all remain susceptible to the same malignant strains of city planning (urban renewal, anyone?) there's also great opportunity for change. While the transportation challenges urban centers face ...
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This Is What the Cities of the Future Will Look Like 8.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BOGOTÁ -- People are often so used to a dreadful situation that they see nothing wrong with it. Less than 100 years ago, women could not vote; such a situation was widely accepted. Similarly, today, we are so used to our cities that we aren't aware of potential life-changing improvements that can be made. I hope in 200 years people will say: "How could people live in those horrible cities back in 2015?" Our human habitat today is not just a little bit wrong. It is very wrong. Hopefully, there will soon come a radical paradigm change in what cities and urban life should be like. A city, after all, is only a means to a way of life. More than ever, life happens outside the home, rather than inside it: a good city can make life happier regardless of a society's level of economic development. What is wrong with our cities today? First, we live in fear of getting killed. We tell a 3-year-old child: "A car!" And the child jumps in fright. With good reason: tens of thousands of children are killed by cars every ...
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Clean Ride Mapper helps cyclists avoid polluted air, find quietest route to destination 8.5.2015 TreeHugger
It's up to you to decide if you want to take the shortest route, the cleanest one, or the quietest one.
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Why did the Netherlands embrace the bike? 5.5.2015 TreeHugger
The Guardian picks up the story.
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'Factory Of The Future' Opens On Chicago's South Side 2.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This week Chicago's historic Pullman district saw its first new factory open in more than 30 years. But the 150,000-square-foot plant, where San Francisco-based Method Products will manufacture all of its popular nontoxic cleaning products, looks nothing like the steel mill that previously sat in the heart of the neighborhood. In contrast with the pollution-prone railcars that were once built there, Method’s new “South Side soap box” has its eye on a cleaner future. For one, it is the first plant making cleaning products — and one of only a small number of buildings in any U.S. industry — to earn LEED Platinum certification for its innovative design. The factory boasts a number of unusual features. Most visible from the outside is the giant, 230-foot wind turbine that generates 30 percent of the plant's energy. Three “solar trees” -- upright solar panels -- also help power the factory. Method's newly opened "soap box" on the South Side of Chicago. The facility’s roof is also energy-efficient, thanks to ...
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Los Angeles once had bike highways in the sky 29.4.2015 TreeHugger
Some ideas never go away.
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7 Ways Transit, Bikes & Walking Move Us to Brighter Future 27.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
According to the nation's pundits and prophets, the future of transportation is all figured out for us. Cheaper gas prices mean we can still count on our private cars to take us everywhere we want to go in the years to come. The only big change down the road will be driverless autos, which will make long hours behind the wheel less boring and more productive. But this everything-stays-the-same vision ignores some significant social developments. Americans have actually been driving less per-capita for the past decade, bucking a century-long trend of ever-increasing dependence on automobiles. This startling turnaround is usually written off as a mere statistical blip caused by the great recession and $4 gas, both of which hit in 2008. But, in fact, the driving decline began several years before that. Spearheading this trend of less driving is the Millennial generation , who after spending much of their childhoods confined in the backseats of minivans, is eager for a wider range of transportation ...
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The silly unintended consequences of mandatory helmet laws 23.4.2015 TreeHugger
Helmet laws appear to be more trouble than they are worth.
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Awesome: The number of cyclists in New York City has TRIPLED in the past 10 years! 23.4.2015 TreeHugger
New Amsterdam, again?
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1 to 20 of 1,335