User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-Independent
Category: Alternative Fuel :: Ethanol
1 new since Sep 26 2017 18:02 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Seaweed-fueled cars? Maybe one day, with help of new tech 26.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Cars and trucks might one day run on biofuel made from seaweed with the help of two technologies being developed at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
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New study: Corn's environmental impact varies greatly across the U.S. 23.9.2017 Environmental News Network
New research from the University of Minnesota drills down to the county-level impact of corn production.
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Fires in Australia Pop Up in Places Already Burned 23.9.2017 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
Fires that span across the Northern Territory and Western Australia appear to have broken out in areas that have already been burned in previous fires.  Areas that sport "burn scars", those areas that are a darker, almost red-brown color, are surrounded by fires that are anywhere from a few hours old to 7 days old.  The areas that are seven days old can be attributed to fires that spread but areas that are just a few hours old may be fires that have presumably been put out only to have them break out again.  The Northern Territory of Australia experienced a higher than normal amount of rain this past season allowing the plants and trees that fuel fires to become even more overgrown and subject to becoming fire fodder.
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Green Algae Could Hold Clues for Engineering Faster-Growing Crops 22.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Two new studies of green algae — the scourge of swimming pool owners and freshwater ponds — have revealed new insights into how these organisms siphon carbon dioxide from the air for use in photosynthesis, a key factor in their ability to grow so quickly. Understanding this process may someday help researchers improve the growth rate of crops such as wheat and rice.
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Exquisite octopus slinks out of the water, wanders from pool to pool (video) 20.9.2017 TreeHugger
Specially adapted for land-based maneuvers, the algae octopus also has an enviable mating style and can run on two legs.
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Cereals that defy the drought 19.9.2017 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
Genome decoding provides information about dry and heat-resistant cereals
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An effective way to eliminate atrazine and its by-products in surface water 19.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Atrazine, widely used as a weedkiller, is known to have harmful effects on aquatic wildlife and presents a risk to human health by altering the action of certain hormones.
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Solar-to-Fuel System Recycles CO2 to Make Ethanol and Ethylene 19.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Berkeley Lab advance is first demonstration of efficient, light-powered production of fuel via artificial photosynthesis.
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The atmosphere is changing the food we eat 15.9.2017 TreeHugger
It's called the 'great nutrient collapse,' and yet no one is really talking about it.
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No shortage of hard work 14.9.2017 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
From hand milking with a metal pail and wooden stool to tie-stall and parlour systems, the methods dairy farmers have used to milk their cows has certainly evolved over the years. While the most recent milking system introduced to the dairy industry may help free up a bit of time for dairy farmers, there is still no shortage of hard work.A number of farmers are now adopting an automatic milking system and with it comes a few questions, especially around the environmental impact of the new system.
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Ethanol to Gasoline Switch Raises Nanoparticles in Air 14.9.2017 Climate Change News - ENN
Using ethanol instead of gasoline as a car fuel can reduce emissions of ultrafine particles by a third, which benefits human health and the environment, according to a new study. 
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Hatching an idea 13.9.2017 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
Backyard chickens are permitted in a number of Canadian cities, including Vancouver, Victoria, Whitehorse and some boroughs of Montréal.Wanda Martin would like to see Saskatoon on that list.
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Helping Chinese Farmers Tackle Erosion, Increase Profits 13.9.2017 Environmental News Network
On the steep farming slopes of China, Bozhi Wu and his research associates are finding ways to improve economic and environmental stability.
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An important process that fuels harmful algal blooms investigated in water bodies across Canada 13.9.2017 Environmental News Network
For many Canadians, summer time means time at the lake, swimming, fishing, boating, and relaxing. Nothing can spoil this experience like blue-green mats of muck, caused by algal blooms. These blooms negatively affect not only recreational activities but also put drinking water source, property values, wildlife, and human health at risk. In the 1970s, scientists discovered that the nutrient phosphorus caused algal blooms, which led to new regulations and improved sewage treatment. Nevertheless, blooms continue to plague many Canadian lakes. To investigate what might be happening, scientists looked to see whether phosphorus might be recirculating from the mud at the bottom of lakes back into the water.
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Airline industry could fly thousands of miles on biofuel from a new promising feedstock 12.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
A Boeing 747 burns one gallon of jet fuel each second. A recent analysis from researchers at the University of Illinois estimate that this aircraft could fly for 10 hours on bio-jet fuel produced on 54 acres of specially engineered sugarcane.
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Antibiotic-Brined Chicken and Other Bad Ideas from US Farming 6.9.2017 Environmental News Network
These days, the only thing more American than apple pie is eating an animal raised on antibiotics. Eighty percent of antibiotics sold in the US go not to human patients, but to the nation’s plate-bound pigs, cows, turkeys, and chickens. As these wonder drugs became a mainstay of modern agriculture, factory farms began churning out another, far less welcome commodity—antibiotic resistant bacteria. These deadly new microbial threats are expected to claim the lives of 10 million people by 2050. How did this happen? And where does it end?
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Research Dog Helps Scientists Save Endangered Carnivores 6.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Scat-sniffing research dogs are helping scientists map out a plan to save reclusive jaguars, pumas, bush dogs and other endangered carnivores in the increasingly fragmented forests of northeastern Argentina, according to a new study from Washington University in St. Louis.
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Scientists developed "smart fertilizer" 5.9.2017 Environmental News Network
According to the head of the works Tatiana Volova, Professor of SibFU and the Head of Laboratory in the Institute of Biophysics KSC of SB RAS, development of a new generation of drugs with the use of bio-decomposable materials which decompose under the influence of the microflora to innocuous products and provide a gradual release of the active principle into the soil, is the newest area of research in the field of agriculture. For example, nitrogen is one of the elements, which is often lacking for the growth and development of plants. Plant-available nitrogen in the soil is usually small. Moreover, its compounds are chemically very mobile and easily leached from the soil. In this connection there is the task of developing such forms of nitrogen fertilizers that provide slow release nitrogen and the constancy of its concentration in the soil.
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Scientists say drones may help to spot harmful algae blooms 4.9.2017 Science / Technology News

Scientists in Virginia say that drones may help them spot algae blooms that are harmful to the environment and to human health. The Daily Press reported Saturday that biologists at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science in Gloucester Point have traditionally used boats and special sunglasses.

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Algae Fortifies Coral Reefs in Past and Present 30.8.2017 Environmental News Network
The Great Barrier Reef, and most other large reefs around the world, owe their bulk in large part to a type of red algae that grows on corals and strengthens them. New research led by Anna Weiss, a Ph.D. candidate at The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences, has found that ancient coral reefs were also bolstered by their bond with red algae, a finding that could help scientists better understand how reefs will respond to climate change.“Coral reefs as we know them today are a product of that long term coral-coralline algae relationship,” Weiss said. “So if we want to preserve our coral reefs, we need to pay attention to the health of coralline algae as well.”
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