User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Diversity
Last updated: Feb 20 2018 19:08 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How GM, Mars and Timberland are cultivating smallholder farmers 20.2.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Thriving agricultural communities are critical for the long-term for these companies. Plus, three tips for managing programs that combine the "head" with the "heart."
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The Green Movement Is Lily White. That’s a Problem. 17.2.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Grist and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.  It’s been 20 years since Esteban González Burchard took a trip to Chicago that changed his life. The asthma researcher had been to the Windy City before, so tourism wasn’t on his agenda. Rather, he was there to attend the American Thoracic […]
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Activists sue Washington state for tougher climate policy 17.2.2018 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- Environmental activists are suing Washington state, the latest state-level effort to boost use of renewable energy....
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The Man Behind the Flint Water Prosecutions Wants to Be the Next Governor of Michigan 16.2.2018 Mother Jones
Two years ago, at the height of the Flint water crisis, residents of this impoverished, majority-black city were demanding accountability. Thousands of children had been exposed to dangerous levels of lead, and activists placed the blame squarely on the shoulders of Republican Gov. Rick Snyder and his administration. There were calls for Snyder’s resignation, for […]
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test - some word 9.2.2018 IUCN - Issues News
Involving and supporting Indigenous peoples and local communities in the fight against wildlife trafficking is essential, yet often overlooked, writes Rosie Cooney, Chair of IUCN’s Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist Group, following a meeting held in Cameroon to address the issue. On 19 January, the IUCN Oceania Regional Office gathered in Pacific Harbour, Suva, for its annual staff retreat.  After two days of reflection and renewal, a small get-together was organised for staff and families. Not only was it a time to remind staff on the importance of maintaining focus on quality and efficiency in our work practise, but also the importance of IUCN’s role in the Oceania region was reiterated. The region needs IUCN’s diverse and powerful Union, now more than ever.  Photo: Sereana Narayan Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea ...
The Islamic State’s toxic farewell: Environmental sabotage and chronic disease 5.2.2018 Washington Post
Oil wells ignited in Iraq by retreating ISIS militants burned for nine months, killing cattle, ruining cropland, fouling water supplies and causing permanent breathing ailments for many residents.
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The Energy 202: Trump keeps saying the U.S. may stay in the Paris climate accord. And the media keeps believing him. 30.1.2018 Washington Post: Politics
The rhetoric is misleading.
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What White People Can Do for Food Justice 29.1.2018 Truthout.com
People of color have been working for food justice for decades. They need resources. Chef Nadine Nelson, creator of Master Cooks Corps train-the-trainer program, says white people in the food movement should ask: What are you doing to hold yourself accountable to people of color? Best-selling author Mark Bittman prepares lunch in Washington, DC, on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Photo: Nikki Kahn / The Washington Post via Getty Images)   Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! It is possible that the rich and famous can offer more to society than glimpses into their opulent lifestyles. The cult of celebrity today goes beyond our desire and admiration of superstars' expensive clothes, cars, and houses. We want to know where they stand on important issues that impact our lives, like racism, sexual violence, the environment, food and land reform. To our consolation, some of them are actually using their platforms to stand ...
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JeffCo health is working to fix community inequities by fixing themselves first 28.1.2018 Headlines: All Headlines
Jefferson County Public Health has joined a growing number of local health departments that are making a concerted effort to tackle health disparities, not just by targeting the issues themselves, but by changing their department's culture.
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Climate Change Is Forcing the Government to Relocate This Entire Louisiana Town 25.1.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by CityLab and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The only land route that connects Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, to the rest of the continental United States is Island Road, a thin, four-mile stretch of pavement that lies inches above sea level and immediately drops off into open […]
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There's nothing 'anti-immigrant' about advocating for a sustainable future for American workers 19.1.2018 LA Times: Commentary

To the editor: Amid the often-passionate debate about immigration issues, the advocacy of our organization, NumbersUSA, is sometimes misstated — as it was by a letter writer who called us “anti-immigrant.” (“The GOP hardliners’ stance on DACA is the act of a dying political party,” Readers React,...

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The Trump Administration's Attacks on Public Lands and Waters Will Cause Irreparable Harm 18.1.2018 Truthout.com
The designation of a national monument protects the land from drilling, fracking, mining, logging -- protection not afforded to the majority of public land, says Randi Spivak of the Center for Biological Diversity. Spivak discusses why the largest delisting of protected federal lands in US history will harm species, waters and exacerbate climate change. Who are the powerful funders behind Truthout? Our readers! Help us publish more stories like this one by making a tax-deductible donation. In December, Trump  announced  that he would shrink Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments in Utah by 85 percent and 46 percent respectively. The announcement came after Trump had ordered Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke in April to review 27 national monuments created since 1996 that were 100,000 acres or larger, and Zinke subsequently recommended that these and other monuments be reduced. Trump's move represents the  largest  delisting of protected federal lands in US history, removing 2 ...
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In its Quest to Kill Regulations, Trump’s EPA May Allow Teenagers to Handle Farm Pesticides Again 18.1.2018 Mother Jones
In its ongoing zeal to nix regulations, the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency has yet another one in its crosshairs: a rule banning minors from applying pesticides on farms. In December, amid the frenzied debate over the GOP tax overhaul, the EPA announced in a release its intent to “revise the minimum age requirements” for pesticide […]
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A long simmering factor in Iran protests: climate change 18.1.2018 L.A. Times - World News

In the mountains of western Iran, the province of Chaharmahal Bakhtiari is known for mile-high lagoons, flowing rivers and wetlands that attract thousands of species of migratory birds.

But years of diminishing rainfall have shriveled water sources. Conditions worsened, residents say, after Iranian...

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The Energy 202: Trump administration is trying to sell natural gas to African countries president disparaged 17.1.2018 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Trump administration is trying to sell natural gas to African countries president disparaged
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South L.A. commission backs stiff new rules for oil site near USC 17.1.2018 LA Times: Commentary

A South Los Angeles commission upheld city demands Tuesday night to stiffen rules for an oil production site that sits next to homes, overriding objections from the company that runs the Jefferson Boulevard facility.

“We all can appreciate the importance of oil and gas … but I don’t think it should...

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Can Prisons Be Flipped for Good? 8.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
GrowingChange is engaging youth in the process of flipping an old North Carolina prison into a sustainable agriculture hub. (Photo courtesy of GrowingChange) This story is the eighth piece in "America's Toxic Prisons," an investigative, collaborative series between Truthout and Earth Island Journal. This series dives deeply into the intersection between mass incarceration and environmental justice. Imagine a rural oasis of sustainable agriculture and community. There are aquaponic ponds filled with fish, fields lined with vegetable rows, pastures for farm animals, and hives buzzing with bees. There are dormitories for staff, a community kitchen for culinary classes, and even a climbing wall for energetic kids. Now picture all of this at the site of a former jail in Wagram, North Carolina -- the fish swimming in tanks in old jail cells, the cows contained by old prison fence lines, and the climbing wall converted from a guard tower. That's the vision put forth by GrowingChange , a nonprofit that's ...
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The Energy 202: Oil and gas companies get a New Year's Day gift 5.1.2018 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Oil and gas companies get a New Year's Day gift
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The Daily 202: Trump’s true priorities revealed in holiday news dumps 2.1.2018 Washington Post: Politics
The tax bill wasn’t the only Christmas gift that the president gave billionaires and big business. Here are 10 important stories you might have missed while on vacation.
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A National Beautification Campaign Revitalized Communities in the '60s and Could Again Today 1.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In the 1960s, Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson's campaign to protect the natural beauty of the United States united Americans during divisive times. The drums of war drowned out Johnson's efforts, but activists believe beauty can unite us again today. Lady Bird Johnson and Stewart Udall in a raft on the Snake River. (Photo: LBJ Library ) Here at Truthout, our commitment to uncovering injustice, disseminating transformative ideas and inspiring action is as steadfast as ever. Will you join us in this mission? "If anything can save the world, I'd put my money on beauty," once declared Doug Tompkins, conservationist and founder of the global clothing giants, The North Face and Esprit. The beauty he meant was not the garments he sold, but the natural beauty of the Earth, and the beauty of well-designed human environments.  In this polarized time, can a campaign for beauty help bring Americans together? I think so. Beauty was once very much a part of the American dialogue and tradition. It animated the paintings ...
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