On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Diversity
Last updated: Dec 25 2018 21:24 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The fossil fuel industry wants you to believe it's good for people of color 23.11.2020 LA Times: Environment

The climate crisis disproportionately harms Black people, Latinos and Native Americans. But oil and gas supporters are trying to claim the moral high ground.

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Rape, worker abuses are common in palm oil fields linked to top beauty brands and everyday household products 21.11.2020 Chicago Tribune: Business
Palm oil is found in everything from potato chips and pills to pet food, and also ends up in products from L’Oréal, Unilever, Procter & Gamble, Avon, Johnson & Johnson.
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Policy News: November 9, 2020 9.11.2020 EcoTone
In This Issue: Join an ESA Webinar Today about the 2020 Election Results Join the Public Affairs Office at 3:00pm eastern for a discussion of the implications for scientific and environmental policy. Vice President Joe Biden Wins Presidential Election Democrats retain majority in the House of Representatives, Senate races in Georgia go to runoffs. ESA ...
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4 ways businesses can connect with their communities to create a clean economy 6.11.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
4 ways businesses can connect with their communities to create a clean economy Marian Jones Fri, 11/06/2020 - 01:00 Companies often struggle with building community trust as they navigate between profit-making and authentically engaging on climate change and environmental justice matters. Last week at GreenBiz Group’s virtual conference and expo on stimulating the clean economy, VERGE 20 , community leaders and businesses from across the country came together to network, share insights and explore solutions to these challenges. During the panel "Connecting Communities to the Clean Economy," experts shared their experiences working with private companies, their fights for green jobs and why businesses need to think of themselves as part of the community. The talk featured two women of color and leaders within the environmental and economic justice movement: Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of UPROSE (founded as the United Puerto Rican Organization of Sunset Park); and Rahwa Ghirmatzion, executive ...
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After the Election: Time for Radical Grassroots Action 6.11.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines
Thank God it’s over. The 2020 U.S. presidential election provided a perfect example of contemporary political degeneration. Two highly unpopular politicians, Joe Biden and Donald Trump―both backed by wealthy corporations and billionaire donors including Silicon Valley, Wall Street, the fossil fuel industry, Big Pharma, the military industrial complex and corporate agribusiness―squared off against one another in a multi-billion billion-dollar mudslinging contest for the White House. As the candidates traded blows on the campaign trail, the climate emergency, food and farming, institutional racism, deteriorating public health, environmental destruction, 1.6 trillion dollars in student debt, a crumbling infrastructure and how to get 30 million unemployed people back to work were barely discussed except in rhetorical soundbites depicting the other as “dangerous communist” or “Nazi-like ...
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RELEASE: South Africa Joins WRI, Coalition for Urban Transitions in Supporting Green and Equitable Urban Recovery After COVID-19 30.10.2020 WRI Stories
RELEASE: South Africa Joins WRI, Coalition for Urban Transitions in Supporting Green and Equitable Urban Recovery After COVID-19 New partnership focused on supporting national urban development planning towards low-carbon, resilient, inclusive cities JOHANNESBURG (October 30, 2020) — The South Africa National Department for Cooperative Governance, WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities, and Coalition for Urban Transitions announced a new partnership to help achieve a more green and equitable recovery for cities in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. “This global partnership is a commitment to resolving one of the biggest challenges facing us. In it, we exemplify our desire for change. We acknowledge that it’s our responsibility to act now to preserve our natural world for future generations,” said Deputy Minister Parks Tau, of South Africa’s Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs at the virtual launch event, “Investing in Cities for a Green and Equitable Future,” held today. Part of ...
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Environmental Factors To Blame for Increase in Childhood Cancers – New Coalition Report 29.10.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

A 34% increase in childhood cancers since 1975 has led a group of scientists, health professionals, businesses, and advocates to ignite a call to action to highlight preventable environmental factors that threaten our children.

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How Partnerships Can Turbo Charge Progress on the SDGs 27.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print Today's challenges require collaboration and action from governments, businesses and civil society organizations alike. Photo by Frederic Koberl/Unsplash In 2015, the world adopted the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end inequities such as poverty, hunger, illiteracy, energy access and gender bias by 2030. Ending these inequities is urgent: an estimated 250 million people will suffer from acute hunger by the end of 2020; more than 1.6 billion children and youth in 190 countries – the majority in low-income countries – do not have adequate educational opportunities; and women are experiencing a disproportionately higher level of job losses than men due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Against this backdrop is the ever-increasing threat to life, livelihoods and the planet from climate change. These serious and significant challenges require collaboration and collective action among governments, businesses and civil society organizations. Such transformative action is particularly ...
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Chlorpyrifos: Common Pesticide Tied To Brain Damage in Children 27.10.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines
Chlorpyrifos insecticides were introduced by Dow Chemical in 1965 and have been used widely in agricultural settings. Commonly known as the active ingredient in the brand names Dursban and Lorsban, chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate insecticide, acaricide and miticide used primarily to control foliage and soil-borne insect pests on a variety of food and feed crops. Products come in liquid form as well as granules, powders, and water-soluble packets, and may be applied by either ground or aerial equipment. Chlorpyrifos is used on a wide variety of crops including apples, oranges, strawberries, corn, wheat, citrus and other foods families and their children eat daily. USDA’s Pesticide Data Program found chlorpyrifos residue on citrus and melons even after being washed and peeled. By volume, chlorpyrifos is most used on corn and soybeans, with over a million pounds applied annually to each crop. The chemical is not allowed on organic ...
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New Poll Shows Many White Americans Unaware of Unequal Burden of Pollution 26.10.2020 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
New Poll Shows Many White Americans Unaware of Unequal Burden of Pollution
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Polluted Air and Water Is a Racial Justice Issue. Let’s Fight it that Way. 26.10.2020 THE CITY FIX
Around the world, communities of color and marginalized groups disproportionately feel the effects of pollution and other environmental impacts. Whether it’s residents living along the polluted Cooum River in Chennai, India; Louisiana’s petrochemical-dense Cancer Alley; Thailand’s toxic hot spot Map Ta Phut Industrial ...
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These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health 26.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health Oliver Camp Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:30 On the recent World Food Day, the clarion call was clearer than ever: We must fix our food systems to improve human health, drive economic growth and save the planet from environmental collapse. The challenges facing us are wide-ranging. The way the world produces and consumes food causes huge environmental impacts, and yet 3 billion people worldwide are unable to afford a healthy diet, and up to a third of the food we produce is wasted. What’s more, hunger and micronutrient deficiencies are concentrated among the poorest and most vulnerable — often including those who produce the food we eat. Meanwhile, the so-called double burden of malnutrition is on the rise: hunger and malnourishment coexisting with overweight and obesity, often in the same countries, communities or even individuals. Tackling these multiple challenges and threats requires coordinated action from the public sector, private ...
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Pollution Is a Racial Justice Issue. Let’s Fight it that Way. 22.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print Nangsao Witlawan, a resident of Thailand's Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate, where pollution contaminates nearby wells with mercury and other toxins. Photo by Laura Villadiego Around the world, communities of color and marginalized groups disproportionately feel the effects of pollution and other environmental impacts. Whether it’s residents living along the polluted Cooum River in Chennai, India ; Louisiana’s petrochemical-dense Cancer Alley ; Thailand’s toxic hot spot Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate ; or children living near a battery recycling factory in Naucalpan De Juárez, Mexico , environmental racism has long exposed poor people and people of color to dangerously high levels of lead, contaminated water and bad air . These communities suffer from high incidences of related ailments, such as cancer and asthma. Many have also witnessed the desecration of cultural landmarks . A Natural Resources Defense Council report issued last year, Watered Down Justice,  found that race is the factor that bears ...
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Op-Ed: Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court could shred environmental protections 22.10.2020 LA Times: Opinion

It was disturbing to hear her describe climate change as 'a very contentious matter of public debate' rather than as scientifically established fact.

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Feds investigating if Chicago zoning policies are racist by protecting polluters in Black and Latino neighborhoods 21.10.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
At issue are steps taken by city agencies to benefit General Iron Industries, cq a clout-heavy scrap shredder with a long history of pollution problems.
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Court allows Exide to abandon a toxic site in Vernon. Taxpayers will fund the cleanup 17.10.2020 LA Times: Environment

A bankruptcy court says Exide Technologies can abandon its toxic battery recycling plant in Vernon, leaving a massive cleanup to California taxpayers.

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Mining Threatens 20% of Indigenous Lands in the Amazon 7.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print Farmer in Tambopata, Madre de Dios, Peru. Photo by Yoly Gutierrez/CIFOR For decades, the Yaigojé Apaporis Indigenous People in Colombia’s lower Apaporis River Basin worked to get their traditional lands formally recognized by the government and secured from outside threats. Initially protected as the Yaigojé Apaporis Reserve, it was also declared an Indigenous territory in 1988. But in 2007, Cosigo Resources, a Canadian mining company, requested from the government a gold mining concession within the Yaigojé Apaporis Reserve. The Yaigojé Apaporis were alarmed, but unlike other Indigenous groups around the world, they had some legal options. Laws in Colombia recognize Indigenous Peoples’ right of consultation, although not consent. They also provide Indigenous communities with the right of first refusal, meaning they are first offered the mineral rights before the government can grant a mining concession to a third party. And while national laws allow mining on Indigenous lands, it is not permitted ...
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RELEASE: New Study Reveals Mining in the Amazon Threatens 20% of Indigenous Lands 7.10.2020 WRI Stories
RELEASE: New Study Reveals Mining in the Amazon Threatens 20% of Indigenous Lands HTML Editor - Full Version Legal and illegal mining on more than 1,100 Indigenous lands in the Amazon linked to higher levels of deforestation WASHINGTON (October 7, 2020) — A new report reveals that mining operations in the Amazon basin now cover more than 20% of Indigenous lands, threatening hundreds of Indigenous communities and endangering critical ecosystems across 450,000 square kilometers. This new paper from World Resources Institute and the Amazon Geo-Referenced Socio-Environmental Information Network (RAISG) details for the first time the full extent of large-scale mining concessions and illegal mining on Indigenous territories across the Amazonian rainforest, and offers solutions.  With gold prices skyrocketing and demand for other minerals on the rise, mining is a growing threat to ecosystems and communities around the world. In the new report, Undermining Rights: Indigenous Lands and Mining in the Amazon , WRI ...
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Inside Beautycounter’s quest to transform its mica supply chain 5.10.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Inside Beautycounter’s quest to transform its mica supply chain Joel Makower Mon, 10/05/2020 - 02:11 First in a two-part series. This story begins, as so many supply-chain stories do, at a mine, the beginning of a journey in which a commodity — mica, in this case — finds its way into an extraordinarily diverse array of quotidian things: attic insulation; brake linings; car paint; concrete; electronic capacitors; epoxies; fertilizers; gypsum wallboard; LED lights; molded rubber; oil and gas drilling fluids; plastics; printing inks; roofing shingles; and toothpaste. And somewhere down that list: cosmetics. The mine in question — actually, thousands of them — can be found in the eastern Indian province of Jharkhand, just over 200 miles west of the cultural hub of Kolkata. Jharkhand — and Bihar, its neighbor to the north — boast one of the world’s richest veins of mica as well as a complex ecosystem of players large and small that provide the shiny, shimmering rock to global markets, including to a maverick ...
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Green Space: An Underestimated Tool to Create More Equal Cities 5.10.2020 THE CITY FIX
As coronavirus restrictions ease around the world, many consider a walk around their neighborhood for some fresh air to be a welcome break from confinement. However, socioeconomic status could greatly affect the landscapes people find on these strolls, particularly in how much ...
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