User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Diversity
Last updated: Sep 16 2020 03:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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New Study Finds Toxic 'Forever Chemicals' Contaminating School Water Systems in 18 States 16.9.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

A study published Thursday warned water systems for numerous schools and day care centers in 18 states may have been contaminated by toxic chemicals produced at nearby chemical plants. The Environmental Working Group conducted the study by looking at the water systems for schools across the U.S. at risk of contamination, focusing on finding per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, known as PFAS or fluorinated “forever chemicals.”

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New Research Shows Disproportionate Rate of Coronavirus Deaths in Polluted Areas 15.9.2020 Mother Jones
This story was published originally by ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up for ProPublica’s Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox as soon as they are published. The industrial plants in the riverside Louisiana city of Port Allen have worried Diana LeBlanc since her children […]
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COVID-19, weakened environmental protections, and rights infringements threaten the Amazon’s Indigenous territories and protected areas 14.9.2020 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
This post was coauthored by Bärbel Henneberger. Indigenous communities living in the Amazon rainforest are known as the ‘guardians of the forest’ because of their effectiveness in keeping forests intact. Indigenous territories and protected areas, which cover 52 percent of the Amazon and store 58 percent of the carbon, outperform surrounding lands in terms of […]
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New Location, New Perspectives: Hearing from African Voices in the Restoration Movement 11.9.2020 WRI Stories
New Location, New Perspectives: Hearing from African Voices in the Restoration Movement Comments|Add Comment|PrintAt Sokomani's nursery, workers grow native plants like spekboom. Photo: Siyabulela Sokomani Siyabulela “Siya” Sokomani, a young entrepreneur from South Africa, runs a commercial nursery that grows thousands of native saplings every year. By nurturing those trees, he is restoring degraded land and fighting climate change in his community’s township in Cape Town. He’s one of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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RELEASE: Consortium Launches Program to Train Next Generation of City Climate Resilience Leaders 10.9.2020 WRI Stories
RELEASE: Consortium Launches Program to Train Next Generation of City Climate Resilience LeadersGlobal Commission on Adaptation brings together broad coalition of universities, cities and community organizations to help cities build resilience to climate change   WASHINGTON, D.C. (September 10, 2020) — A global consortium of universities, cities, community organizations and World Resources Institute launched an initiative to build cities’ capacities to adapt to the impacts of climate change.... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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What Has the Ocean Ever Done for Us? Humanizing the Sustainable Ocean Economy Narrative 8.9.2020 WRI Stories
What Has the Ocean Ever Done for Us? Humanizing the Sustainable Ocean Economy Narrative Comments|Add Comment|PrintHonolulu harbor. Photo by Bryan/Flickr When we consider the ocean and its relationship to humankind, we often think of it in terms of a transaction: the material and economic benefits the ocean delivers. While these are immense – the value of ocean ecosystem services has been placed at $2.8 trillion annually – there’s far more to recognize. The current COVID-19 crisis has... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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UN plan to protect 30 percent of the planet by 2030 could displace hundreds of millions, NGOs and experts warn 2.9.2020 Survival International
These Khadia men were thrown off their land after it was turned into a tiger reserve. They lived for months under plastic sheets. Millions more face this fate if the 30% plan goes ahead. © Survival International One hundred twenty eight environmental and human rights NGOs and experts today warn that a United Nations drive to increase global protected areas such as national parks could lead to severe human rights violations and cause irreversible social harm for some of the world’s poorest people. 1 In May 2021, the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) is set to agree on a new target to place at least 30 percent of the Earth’s surface under conservation status by 2030 2 . This ‘30 x 30’ target would double the current protected land area over the coming decade. 3 However, concerns about the human cost of the proposal as well as its efficacy as an environmental measure are growing as nature protection in regions such as Africa’s Congo Basin and South Asia has become increasingly ...
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Op-Ed: Warren Buffett can save the Klamath River Basin. Will he? 19.8.2020 LA Times: Commentary

The removal of four dams along the California-Oregon border is crucial to the Yurok and Karuk tribes, the Klamath's salmon runs and the river itself.

Organic Diets Quickly Reduce the Amount of Glyphosate in People’s Bodies 13.8.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

Eating an organic diet rapidly and significantly reduces exposure to glyphosate—the world's most widely-used weed killer, which has been linked to cancer, hormone disruption and other harmful impacts, according to a new study.

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After 250 years, Esselen Tribe regains a piece of its ancestral homeland 31.7.2020 LA Times: Environment

A $4.5-million land deal, brokered by Portland-based environmental group Western Rivers Conservancy, will transfer a 1,199-acre parcel of wilderness along the Little Sur River to the tribe in the name of conservation and cultural resilience.

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Sierra Club denounces racism of co-founder John Muir 23.7.2020 LA Times: Environment

John Muir, a towering figure among environmentalists, made harmful and disparaging remarks about Native Americans and Black people.

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Sierra Club calls out the racism of John Muir 22.7.2020 LA Times: Environment

The Sierra Club acknowledges the racist history of its co-founder, the famed environmentalist John Muir.

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Coalition of Food, Justice, Climate and Environmental Groups Calls on Consumers to #BoycottBigMeat 15.7.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines
The Organic Consumers Association (OCA), Forward Latino, Socially Responsible Agricultural Project (SRAP), Dr. Mercola and U.S. Farmers & Ranchers for a Green New Deal, today launched the “Boycott Big Meat” national consumer education and lobbying campaign. The campaign is endorsed by 50+ groups, including Cedar Rapids, Iowa Sunrise Hub and Iowa Alliance for Responsible Agriculture. Join the virtual press conference July 14, 7 p.m. CDT. “Consumers must lead the just transition to a decentralized system of organic regenerative pasture-raised/grass-fed meat production, run by a diverse network of local/regional independent farmers, ranchers, processors and retailers who are committed to fair pay and safe working conditions, and environmental and climate justice,” said Ronnie Cummins, OCA’s international ...
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Chicago air is dirtier in July than smog-choked Los Angeles. More bad air is forecast. 10.7.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
After missing out on cleaner air during the coronavirus lockdown, the Chicago area just suffered its longest streak of high-pollution days in more than a decade.
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How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice 6.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice Kristoffer Tigue Mon, 07/06/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in InsideClimate News and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. In many ways, Maleta Kimmons defines her neighborhood by what it lacks. Several houses near her home remain vacant. Last week, she had to drive seven miles just to buy groceries. And two weeks ago, at the height of the Minneapolis protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd by a police officer May 25, looters broke into the only pharmacy in the area, forcing the store to close and leaving many in the neighborhood without easy access to life-saving medication such as insulin or inhalers for asthma. Kimmons, who prefers to go by the name Queen, said what her neighborhood doesn't lack is pollution. Near North, where Queen lives, is one of several neighborhoods that make up north Minneapolis, a  predominately ...
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Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
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Greta Thunberg Says Covid-19 Should Be Global Wake-Up Call to 'Act With Necessary Force' to Tackle Climate Emergency 24.6.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

"A crisis is a crisis, and in a crisis, we all have to take a few steps back and act for the greater good of each other and our society. In a crisis, you adapt and change your behavior."

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Op-Ed: What DACA has allowed me to achieve for myself and my community 18.6.2020 LA Times: Opinion

Several DACA recipients tell us about how the program has changed their lives and what it's meant to their community.

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Policy News: June 15, 2020 15.6.2020 EcoTone
In This Issue: President Trump Signs Executive Order Directing Agencies to Use Emergency Provisions of Environmental Laws to Speed COVID-19 Economic Recovery Sens. Ted Cruz (R-TX), Tom Cotton (R-AR) and James Lankford (R-OK) introduce bills to reform NEPA permitting. COVID-19 Delays Competition for NEON Management Battelle Memorial Institute will continue to manage NEON in the ...
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Coronavirus spreads beyond meat plants with outbreaks at 60 US baking, agricultural, dairy facilities, raising specter of food shortages 10.6.2020 Chicago Tribune: Business
At least 60 food-processing facilities outside the meatpacking industry have seen COVID-19 outbreaks, with more than 1,000 workers diagnosed with the virus, according to a new study from Environmental Working Group.
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