User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Impacts
Last updated: Feb 20 2018 19:08 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Transit-oriented development? More like transit rider displacement 20.2.2018 LA Times: Commentary

For five years, pundits, planners, and policy-makers have scratched their heads at Los Angeles’ steep public transit ridership decline: a 21% decrease on buses,15% in total. To explain it, they cite ride-sharing, cheap gas, even the law that lets undocumented immigrants get licenses to drive. ...

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All eyes on Minnesota as state readies fight against 3M in water pollution trial 19.2.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
East metro residents and observers from across the country will be watching closely as Minnesota's $5 billion lawsuit against 3M for polluting natural resources finally goes to trial after years of delays.
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Will coffee in California come with a cancer warning? 18.2.2018 LA Times: Commentary

How do you like your cup of cancer in the morning? I take mine with fake sugar and skim milk. Lame, I know. But there’s no accounting for taste in carcinogens. Or, in this case, coffee.

You’ve probably seen the bemused headlines: “Coffee in California may soon come with a spoonful of cancer warnings.”...

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The Green Movement Is Lily White. That’s a Problem. 17.2.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Grist and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.  It’s been 20 years since Esteban González Burchard took a trip to Chicago that changed his life. The asthma researcher had been to the Windy City before, so tourism wasn’t on his agenda. Rather, he was there to attend the American Thoracic […]
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All pain, no gain: BLM methane rule rollback hurts Westerners, helps no one 17.2.2018 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
All pain, no gain: BLM methane rule rollback hurts Westerners, helps no one
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3 Things Cities Can Learn from Cape Town’s Impending “Day Zero” Water Shut-Off 16.2.2018 THE CITY FIX
Cape Town is running out of water. After three years of intense drought, South Africa’s second-largest city is just a few months away from “Day Zero,” the day when the city government will shut off water taps for most homes and businesses. The impacts ...
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Mad about L.A.'s air quality? Blame common products like hairspray and paint, not just cars 16.2.2018 LA Times: Science

When it comes to air quality, the products you use to smell nice or scrub your kitchen could be just as bad as the car you drive. A new study of the air around Los Angeles finds that consumer and industrial products now rival tailpipe emissions in creating atmospheric pollutants.

The findings, ...

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3 Things Cities Can Learn from Cape Town’s Impending “Day Zero” Water Shut-Off 15.2.2018 WRI Stories
3 Things Cities Can Learn from Cape Town’s Impending “Day Zero” Water Shut-Off Comments|Add Comment|PrintCape Town, South Africa is poised to shut off its water taps in the next few months. Photo by Lindria Oosthuizen/Wikimedia Commons Cape Town is running out of water. After three years of intense drought, South Africa’s second-largest city is just a few months away from “Day Zero,” the day when the city government will shut off water taps for most homes and businesses. The impacts of such a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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“The Water Stinks.” For Many Rural Americans the Only Choice Is Toxic. 15.2.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by The New Republic and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. “I’ll be honest with you,” said Gary Michael Hunt. “You never know when you go in there and turn on the faucet if you have water, or if you ain’t going to have no water.” Hunt, a former coal miner […]
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Stockton Democrat temporarily takes over California Legislative Women's Caucus while chair faces harassment investigation 15.2.2018 LA Times: Commentary
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Trump's Infrastructure Plan: Fiction? Scam? Actually, Both 15.2.2018 American Prospect
(Photo by Oliver Contreras/SIPA USA via AP Images) Trump hosts a meeting on infrastructure with state and local officials at the White House on February 12, 2018. Fiction: invention or fabrication as opposed to fact; belief or statement that is false, but that is often held to be true because it is expedient to do so Scam: a dishonest scheme; a fraud First, it’s a fiction. There is no $1.5 trillion plan. It’s $200 billion—that’s all the federal government says it’s going to spend—but then it’s not that either. That $200 billion doesn’t factor in the billions in cuts to transportation, water, energy, and other projects. The Highway Trust Fund that states and cities rely on is zeroed out. Budgetary shell games (a.k.a. budget cuts) are not the new investment that will fill the gaping need in American drinking water, waste water disposal, transit, roads, bridges and other vital infrastructure.   Paul Krugman summed it up in a tweet: “So the real net spending on infrastructure being proposed is basically ...
Trump: Make Immigrants’ Use of Public Health Benefits a Deportable Offense 14.2.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/LM Otero) Community Council health-care navigator Fidel Castro Hernandez speaks with U.S. resident Maria Ana Pina and her son, Roberto, as she signs up for the Affordable Care Act in Dallas on December 27, 2017. Capital & Main  is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. The Trump administration is making new rules that would prevent immigrants from settling in the country or receiving a green card if they or their families have received benefits from a wide array of federal, state, and local programs—even if the benefits were for an immigrant’s U.S.-citizen children. The language in the administration’s rule change, first reported by Reuters, shows that immigrants who enroll their children in public programs like Head Start or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) risk having their visa applications rejected. The same goes for immigrants who apply for health insurance ...
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'Deep down': Rivalry between Koreas, Japan transcends sports 14.2.2018 AP Top News
GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) -- As South Korea's national soccer coach prepared to play Japan in a 1954 World Cup qualifier, President Syngman Rhee, who'd been liberated, with the rest of Korea, from Japan's brutal colonial rule in 1945, had some advice should the Koreans lose: "Don't think about coming back alive," he supposedly told the coach. "Just throw yourself into the Genkai Sea."...
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Metro staff support a $6-billion widening of the 710 Freeway 14.2.2018 LA Times: Commentary

Each year, tens of thousands of truck drivers make the 19-mile trip up the 710 Freeway from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach to rail yards near downtown, carrying cargo bound for every corner of the United States.

The 710 handles so much freight traffic from the ports that commuters on the...

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Love stinks (in a good way), and other lessons of the Valentine's Day sewage tour 13.2.2018 LA Times: Nation

Becky Van and Kale Novalis knew exactly when and where they were going to tell each other, “I love you,” for the first time.

It would be just before Valentine’s Day. They would visit a landmark with a view of the Manhattan skyline. It was a place that fascinated them both but where neither had...

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How 3 Cities Are Navigating the Transition to Electric Buses 13.2.2018 THE CITY FIX
As today’s urban areas house more than half the world’s population and produce more than 80 percent of global economic activity, cities are uniquely positioned to deliver sustainable solutions. However, poor local air quality and issues related to global climate change ...
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Year after Kim's killing, suspected masterminds evade trial 13.2.2018 AP Top News
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) -- Lost in the glare of North Korea's missile launches, rhetorical battles with Washington and charm offensive at the Winter Olympics, two women stand accused of a crime that could send them to the gallows - the stunning assassination of Kim Jong Un's estranged half brother....
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Giant advertiser Unilever threatens to pull its ads from Facebook and Google over 'toxic content' 13.2.2018 L.A. Times - Technology News

One of the world's largest advertisers is threatening to pull its ads from social sites such as Facebook and YouTube if the tech companies don't do more to minimize divisive content on their platforms.

Unilever's chief marketing officer, Keith Weed, will call on Silicon Valley on Monday to better...

Los Angeles tenant groups oppose bill that could lead to a development boom near transit 12.2.2018 LA Times: Commentary
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The US Dumps Its Fracking Waste in My Ohio Town 12.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
My southeastern  Ohio  town in the Appalachian foothills is a small, rural place where the demolition derby is a hot ticket, Walmart is the biggest store, and people in the surrounding villages must often drive for 30 minutes to grocery shop. We hold the unfortunate distinction of being the poorest county in the state: an area that is both stunning -- with rolling hills, rocky cliffs, pastures, and ravines -- and inaccessible, far from industry. It's here, at the Hazel Ginsburg well, that fracking companies dump their waste. Trucks ship that sludge of toxic chemicals and undrinkable water across the country and inject it into my county's forgotten ground. My step-grandmother, the daughter of a Kentucky miner, used to tell me stories of washing her clothes in polluted red water, downstream from mines. Coal companies exploited employees like her father, paying him in company scrip and keeping him poor and exploiting the land. That kind of abuse continues. It's just changed shape. The Ginsburg well has a ...
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