User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: General
Last updated: Oct 24 2014 02:23 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Economics As If Future Generations Mattered 24.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Broad Coalition of Groups Call On Governor Cuomo To Stop Exploding Oil Trains 21.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Hunters and Conservationists Join Forces to Protect Imperiled Wolverines 21.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Why We Are Working With Colleagues in China to Develop Sustainability Metrics 20.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I am in no way an expert on China, but one need not be an expert to understand that China's elite knows they are in the midst of a deep crisis of environmental sustainability. I visited Beijing last week to finalize a partnership between Columbia University's Earth Institute Research Program on Sustainability Policy and Management and the China Center for International Economic Exchanges. Our goal is to develop a set of focused, practical sustainability metrics that can be used by businesses and governmental agencies in China, the United States, and around the world. While there are a number of NGOs and governments engaged in similar work, our goal is to develop measures of the physical dimensions of sustainability, rather than the broader environmental and social justice indicators pursued by many other organizations. The China Center for International Economic Exchanges (CCIEE) is a new and impressive Chinese think tank that has the ear of the government and is loaded with analytic talent. At Columbia, ...
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Good Jobs or Healthy Planet? We Can Have Both 19.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If we really want to fix the environment, then we need to join coalitions with organizations that focus on changing our economic system too. This article is published as part of New Economy Week and in Yes Magazine . We are heading toward a potentially severe clash between environmentalists who advocate for reducing carbon emissions and community and labor activists who are most concerned about jobs, racial equity, and reducing wealth inequality. Our urgency about the climate catastrophe does not trump equity concerns. Both the climate crisis and the wealth gap are deepening -- and both will require aggressive social movements. We can either pull together to work toward a systematic "just transition" -- a transition, that is, that satisfies both groups -- or we can be pitted against each other by corporate interests. I spent the summer interviewing labor, environmental and community justice activists and thinkers about the rift for a longer in-depth article on this topic in The American Prospect. Many of ...
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Can We Earn a Living on a Living Planet? 17.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Could low gas prices be good for the environment? 16.10.2014 TreeHugger
Even for those of us who believe oil is too cheap, lower prices still have a bright side.
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Time for Trash Equity in New York City 14.10.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Eric Goldstein, Director of NRDC's New York City Environment, NY: Everyone who cares about the health of our planet and its people owes a big thank-you to the environmental justice movement for its role in organizing last month’s phenomenal People’s Climate March.  So what better time than now to help...
Must Environmentalists and Labor Activists Find Themselves at Odds With Each Other? 13.10.2014 American Prospect
“I think the American people right now have been so focused, and will continue to be focused, on our economy and jobs and growth, that if the message is somehow we’re going to ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change, I don’t think anybody is going to go for that. I won’t go for that.” --President Barack Obama, November 14, 2012, two weeks after Hurricane Sandy   It has been a tough couple of years in the effort to unite labor, community, and environmental groups, an alliance that has always been strained. The extractive energy sector—coal, gas, oil—has historically had strong union representation and well-paying jobs. Tensions rose in 2011 after the Sierra Club escalated their campaign to close coal plants and 350.org, the climate protection group led by activist Bill McKibben, called for a halt to the Keystone XL Pipeline project.  Even Obama’s relatively mild order this past June on reducing pollution from power plants was opposed by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ...
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Must Environmentalists and Labor Activists Find Themselves at Odds? 13.10.2014 American Prospect
“I think the American people right now have been so focused, and will continue to be focused, on our economy and jobs and growth, that if the message is somehow we’re going to ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change, I don’t think anybody is going to go for that. I won’t go for that.” --President Barack Obama, November 14, 2012, two weeks after Hurricane Sandy   It has been a tough couple of years in the effort to unite labor, community, and environmental groups, an alliance that has always been strained. The extractive energy sector—coal, gas, oil—has historically had strong union representation and well-paying jobs. Tensions rose in 2011 after the Sierra Club escalated their campaign to close coal plants and 350.org, the climate protection group led by activist Bill McKibben, called for a halt to the Keystone XL Pipeline project.  Even Obama’s relatively mild order this past June on reducing pollution from power plants was opposed by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ...
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The World Bank Must Commit to Food Security 10.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The World Bank convenes its Annual Meeting this week in Washington DC to discuss how it can best raise the standard of living for the world's poorest inhabitants. Much will be said about bringing roads, electricity and infrastructure to underdeveloped regions. But how committed is the World Bank to the planet as a whole when it is doling out its loans? The World Bank has been a dominant force in global development, not just through the tens of billions of dollars it injects each year into the global economy, but because of its mission to reduce poverty, raise gender equality and reverse climate change. Such goals are foreign to an investment culture that thrives on deregulation and privatization of vanishing resources. This is what makes this moment so important. Leaked reports reveal that the World Bank's leaders are now considering abandoning its long established loan standards -- known as Social and Environmental Safeguards -- in an effort to compete with a new wave of extremely powerful development ...
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The Solution Is the Soil: How Organic Farming Can Feed the World and Save the Planet 9.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Obama Pays Tribute to Slain Activists 9.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Barack Obama has pledged greater U.S. support for rights defenders, who are increasingly being killed for standing up to injustice. Speaking at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York, the president paid special tribute to four slain activists, among them Chut Wutty from Cambodia. Chut Wutty worked with the campaigning organization that I co-founded, Global Witness , investigating environmental and human rights abuses. He was shot dead in April 2012 by illegal loggers. Wutty could never have imagined he'd be honored by a U.S. head of state. But having marked Wutty's death, the U.S. should now do justice to his life's work, and contemplate the influence it has over the people he left behind. Wutty was what's known as an environmental defender, who sought to protect Cambodia's forests against the country's violent, multi-million-dollar trade in illegal lumber. He did this by exposing how a corrupt political and business elite flout their own laws on forest protection, strike land deals with companies ...
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From the inside-out: Warburg Pincus and EDF Climate Corps’ recipe for replication 8.10.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Michael Reading Since 2008, EDF has worked with private equity firms to integrate environmental, social and governance (ESG) management into their practices. Leveraging our EDF Climate Corps program is a key strategy for replicating our work and we have now placed 44 EDF Climate Corps fellows among private equity firms and portfolio companies, to date. To learn more about how a particular firm has benefitted, I recently spoke with representatives at Warburg Pincus to hear how the EDF Climate Corps program has enhanced their continued efforts to share ESG-related best practices with their portfolio companies. This summer, Warburg Pincus hosted an EDF Climate Corps fellow for the second year in a row, and again chose to place the fellow at the firm level, rather than with a single portfolio company. “Running this process from the center allowed us to identify different opportunities, across our portfolio and coordinate work on each of them,” Warburg Pincus Vice President Michael Frain told me. From ...
Small Farmers of the World Being Crushed by Lavish Subsidies in Wealthy Nations 8.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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5 Reasons Why Climate Change Is a Social Issue, Not Just an Environmental One 7.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As illustrated by the 400,000 attendees at the People's Climate March in New York City and the solidarity events that took place around the word, the realities of climate change are no longer only being stressed by environmentalists. The effects of climate change will be economic, social, and environmental and will alter people's lives in a myriad of ways that we are just beginning to understand. Acceptance of this complex interaction, which follows the prescription laid out by the concept of sustainable development, is key to beginning to enact effective policy on climate. Since the recent New Climate Economy Report focused on climate change through an economic lens, it is time to facilitate discussion on the social effects. Here are 5 reasons why climate change needs to be considered a social issue as well: 1. Small farmers will feel the effects Small farmers already struggle to get a fair price for their goods, safeguard against weather & pests, and compete with large-scale monoculture agricultural ...
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For smart growth, not all urban density is created equal 6.10.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Kaid Benfield, Special Counsel for Urban Solutions, Washington, DC:   Have you ever noticed how those of us who promote walkable, “smart growth” city neighborhoods often choose historic districts to illustrate what we advocate?  Take the photo at the top of this article, for example:  I’m not sure what...
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Sharing a (Not So) Living Planet 3.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Shocking: New Research Shows Pollution Inequality in America Even Worse Than Income Inequality 3.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
James K. Boyce, professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, directs the environment program of the Political Economy Research Institute. His research focuses on the impacts of inequalities of wealth and power and the dynamics of conflict and includes the Toxic 100 Air Polluters , an index identifying the top U.S. air polluters among the world's largest corporations. A 2009 special report by USA Today   drew upon Boyce’s work, along with EPA data, to create a database exposing air toxicity in schools across the country. In a new study funded by the Institute for New Economic Thinking's Political Economy of Distribution Series , Boyce collaborates with Klara Zwickl and Michael Ash to compare disparities of exposure to industrial air pollution in U.S. states and congressional districts among the poor and non-poor, as well as whites and non-whites. They find that in America, inequality is in the very air we breathe. I spoke to Boyce about his research and the impact of environmental ...
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Why an Unequal Planet Can Never Be Green 1.10.2014 Truthout.com
A scene from the 400,000-strong People's Climate March in New York, September 21, 2014. (Photo: Michael O'Brien )What is it going to take to save the planet from environmental devastation? Sheer people power? We certainly saw that on the eve of last week’s UN Climate Summit in New York. Some 400,000 marchers packed the streets of Manhattan. Millions more  rallied  the same day in over 2,600 other actions in 162 countries. Or can simple shaming get world leaders to start seriously addressing the climate change challenge? We saw some serious shaming last week, too. Spoken-word poet Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner from the Marshall Islands — the nation climate change most immediately endangers — helped open Tuesday’s UN summit with an open letter to her baby daughter that reportedly  brought many of the 120 world leaders  present to tears. That letter, unfortunately, wouldn’t be enough to bring those world leaders to their senses. Last week’s summitry, a Christian Science Monitor analysis  notes , left the ...
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