User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: General
Last updated: Oct 20 2017 18:01 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Study finds pollution is deadlier than war, disaster, hunger 20.10.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Environmental pollution -- from filthy air to contaminated water -- is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined.
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Study: World pollution deadlier than wars, disasters, hunger 20.10.2017 Washington Post: World
Environmental pollution — from filthy air to contaminated water — is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined.
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Study: World pollution deadlier than wars, disasters, hunger 20.10.2017 AP Top News
NEW DELHI (AP) -- Environmental pollution - from filthy air to contaminated water - is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined....
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Report: Pollution Kills 3 Times More than AIDS, TB And Malaria Combined 20.10.2017 NPR News
Researchers looked at the combined effects of air, water and soil pollution on global health to come up with an annual toll.
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First Nations-led renewable energy generation in B.C. offers promising path forward 18.10.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Eryn Fitzgerald Judith (Kekinusuqs) Sayers These are exciting times in British Columbia for those interested in building sustainable, just and climate-friendly energy systems. The recent change in government could mean a shift away from a corporate agenda driven by the needs of a massively energy-intensive fracking and LNG industry towards one that prioritizes action on climate change, First Nations' self-determination and community-scale economic development. Indeed, First Nations-led renewable energy generation offers a promising path forward for each of these. The momentum that First Nations have already built in this area, combined with developments in renewable energy technology, means they are well-positioned to be leaders in B.C.'s transition to a sustainable energy system. We recently completed a province-wide  survey  of First Nations' involvement in the renewable energy sector, which turned up some provocative results. The survey was sent to all 203 First Nations in the province, and received a ...
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Blueprint for a Progressive US: A Dialogue With Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin 17.10.2017 Truthout.com
(Photo: Bianca Pontes / EyeEm) Expanding educational opportunities and building a green economy -- while shrinking both the military and the fossil fuel industry -- are the best routes to full employment, say world-renowned public intellectuals Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin. Also, greater financial regulation and more public development banks that prioritize social welfare over massive profits are crucial for a progressive agenda. (Photo: Bianca Pontes / EyeEm) You can fuel thoughtful, authority-challenging journalism: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout. This is the first part of a wide-ranging interview with world-renowned public intellectuals Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin. The next installment will appear on October 24. Not long after taking office, it became evident that Donald Trump had engaged in fraudulent populism during his campaign. His promise to "Make America Great Again" has been exposed as a lie, as the Trump administration has been busy extending US military power, ...
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Urban Noise Pollution Is Worst in Poor and Minority Neighborhoods and Segregated Cities 9.10.2017 Truthout.com
Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! Most Americans think of cities as noisy places -- but some parts of US cities are much louder than others. Nationwide, neighborhoods with higher poverty rates and proportions of black, Hispanic and Asian residents have higher noise levels than other neighborhoods. In addition, in more racially segregated cities, living conditions are louder for everyone, regardless of their race or ethnicity. As environmental health researchers, we are interested in learning how everyday environmental exposures affect different population groups. In a new study we detail our findings on noise pollution, which has direct impacts on public health. Scientists have documented that environmental hazards, such as air pollution and hazardous waste sites, are not evenly distributed across different populations. Often socially disadvantaged groups such as ...
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The sustainability movement confronts its 'lean in' moment 25.9.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
It's time to think more about diversity and social inclusions, from the inside out.
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Hurricanes Expose The Foundations Of Our Cities And The Limits Of Urban Sustainability 19.9.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When Hurricane Harvey displaced 30,000 people in Houston and Hurricane Irma threw the lives of millions into disarray across
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Harvey’s Poorest Victims Will Never Rebuild. They’re Getting Evicted. 15.9.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by CityLab and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Hilton Kelley has been sounding off on Facebook Live the past few days about families who evacuated their homes to escape Hurricane Harvey and are now getting eviction notices. The families live in Port Arthur, Texas, the small Gulf Coast city […]
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Scott Pruitt’s relentless distortions of climate science and law 12.9.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
This summer was anything but quiet for climate policy. In June, President Trump announced that the U.S. would withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. In July, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit blocked Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt's attempt to suspend protections from climate-destabilizing oil and gas pollution, calling the move “unauthorized” and “unreasonable.” In August, two judges of the same court reminded EPA of its “affirmative statutory obligation to regulate greenhouse gases,” citing longstanding Supreme Court precedent. Now, the devastation caused by Hurricane Harvey and the record strength of Hurricane Irma are showing us what’s at stake, as sea level rises and extreme weather becomes more frequent. Meanwhile, Administrator Pruitt has continued his pattern of deeply misleading statements about climate change and EPA’s responsibility to protect public health and the environment. Pruitt uses these statements in an attempt to ...
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Labor Movements and Universalizing Resistance 12.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Political scientist Joseph Luders in The Civil Rights Movement and the Logic of Social Change reflects in an obscure footnote that "Curiously, the labor movement is conventionally ignored by scholars of social movements." This stark observation is the starting point of environmental and labor organizer Jane F. McAlevey's new book. Members of the Chicago Teachers Union participate in a strike on September 12, 2012, in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Peoplesworld ) Charles Derber offers a guide to the new era of organizing in Welcome to the Revolution: Universalizing Resistance for Social Justice and Democracy in Perilous Times. With guest contributions from Medea Benjamin, Ralph Nader, Gar Alperovitz and more, this book makes a compelling argument about how movements must come together. Order your copy today with a donation to Truthout! The following piece by John Trumpbour forms one of the guest "interludes" in Welcome to the Revolution. Political scientist Joseph Luders in The Civil Rights Movement and the ...
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Sustainable development and the end of history 11.9.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Are we experiencing the end of an era — or the beginning of a new one?
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Harvey Is Not a Natural Disaster 7.9.2017 American Prospect
(Kim Brent/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP) Evacuees make their way to Max Bowl, which was converted to a shelter for those displaced by Harvey, in Port Arthur, Texas, on August 30, 2017. It is long past time to stop calling events like Hurricanes Sandy, Katrina, and now Harvey and Irma, natural disasters. There is no such thing. These may be natural events. But many of the costs of recovery—and who pays those costs—are the results of decisions people make. There is nothing natural about the catastrophic consequences of these choices. Planning (or the lack thereof), underfunding the nation’s infrastructure, and a wide range of public policies and private practices that concentrate low-income and non-white families in vulnerable communities are just a few of the “unnatural” factors that have shaped the events unfolding in Houston now. Twelve years ago, Americans saw those same unnatural factors on display in New Orleans and southern Louisiana. That Houston has experienced its third “500-year” flood in the ...
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Houston Flooding Always Hits Poor, Non-White Neighborhoods Hardest 30.8.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Harvey's floodwaters run thick with petrochemicals in some communities, the result of unbridled industry, Wild West regulations and environmental racism.
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Sharing the future 24.8.2017 Opinion – The Indian Express
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Troubled Waters: Tennessee Families Stand Up for a Clean Environment 20.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Sterling and Stray, a now abandoned coal mine in Tennessee, is seen on May 18, 2017. (Photo: Valerie Vozza for Equal Voice News) Clairfield, Tennessee -- On the northern slope of Cooper Ridge --  a long, low-slung rise in Tennessee's Cumberland Mountains --  sits the 127-year-old Hatfield Cemetery, a well-maintained strip of flower-adorned plots where gravestones older than a century sit next to still-fresh graves. Bright pink ribbons hang in the tree branches surrounding the cemetery, marking 100 feet from the burial grounds. Beyond them is planned one of the largest surface coal mines in Tennessee's history. The mine will soon surround the cemetery. On an afternoon in May, a swath of clear-cut logging was visible through the trees, and heavy machinery could be heard over the sound of chirping birds.  The Cooper Ridge mine will span a total of roughly 1,400 acres of land, both above and below ground, stretching from the southern tip of the ridge where it will encircle Hatfield Cemetery to the northern ...
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Under Trump, Environmental Justice Policy Ignores an Entire Section of the Population 9.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Janine Jackson: The story of Flint, Michigan's water is far from over. The state attorney general has brought  involuntary manslaughter charges  against five officials so far, for waiting a year to tell the largely African-American community about an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease, believed to have killed at least 12 people, and for deflecting scrutiny of the outbreak, which, along with lead levels that in some cases qualified the city's water as toxic waste, was linked to the failure to take anti-corrosion measures when the city switched water sources. That was on the watch of Flint's then -- emergency manager Darnell Earley, who faces charges along with Health and Human Services Director Nick Lyon and others. The case has issues. The AG says he wasn't able to interview Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, for example, who Earley answered to, after all, but it's still a perhaps unprecedented effort to hold state officials accountable for failing to protect the public. That said, if systemic problems could be ...
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What we know about California's largest toxic cleanup: Thousands of L.A. County homes tainted with lead 6.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary
By this fall, the state plans to begin cleaning lead-tainted soil at 2,500 homes near a shuttered battery plant. But thousands more residents are unsure when, or if, their homes will be cleaned.
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Do Bus Rapid Transit Systems Improve Equity? A Look at the Evidence 1.8.2017 THE CITY FIX
Some time ago, professor Christo Venter of the University of Pretoria sent me an intriguing message: Did I have data on how bus rapid transit systems, or BRTs, affect equity in cities? Impact evaluations for changes in travel time, cost, ...
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