User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: General
Last updated: Aug 09 2017 19:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Under Trump, Environmental Justice Policy Ignores an Entire Section of the Population 9.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Janine Jackson: The story of Flint, Michigan's water is far from over. The state attorney general has brought  involuntary manslaughter charges  against five officials so far, for waiting a year to tell the largely African-American community about an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease, believed to have killed at least 12 people, and for deflecting scrutiny of the outbreak, which, along with lead levels that in some cases qualified the city's water as toxic waste, was linked to the failure to take anti-corrosion measures when the city switched water sources. That was on the watch of Flint's then -- emergency manager Darnell Earley, who faces charges along with Health and Human Services Director Nick Lyon and others. The case has issues. The AG says he wasn't able to interview Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, for example, who Earley answered to, after all, but it's still a perhaps unprecedented effort to hold state officials accountable for failing to protect the public. That said, if systemic problems could be ...
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What we know about California's largest toxic cleanup: Thousands of L.A. County homes tainted with lead 6.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary
By this fall, the state plans to begin cleaning lead-tainted soil at 2,500 homes near a shuttered battery plant. But thousands more residents are unsure when, or if, their homes will be cleaned.
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Do Bus Rapid Transit Systems Improve Equity? A Look at the Evidence 1.8.2017 THE CITY FIX
Some time ago, professor Christo Venter of the University of Pretoria sent me an intriguing message: Did I have data on how bus rapid transit systems, or BRTs, affect equity in cities? Impact evaluations for changes in travel time, cost, ...
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Can the Town of Vail become continent’s first sustainable tourism destination? 29.7.2017 Denver Post: Business
The resort-anchored Town of Vail trying to become the continent’s first sustainable tourist destination certified through the Global Sustainable Tourism Council.
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Has the Moment for Environmental Justice Been Lost? 26.7.2017 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared on ProPublica. Given how President Donald Trump has taken aim at the Environmental Protection Agency with regulatory rollbacks and deep proposed budget cuts, it may come as no surprise that the Office of Environmental Justice is on the chopping block. This tiny corner of the EPA was established 24 years ago to advocate for […]
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Friday Fun: How Pop-Up Clothing Shops Create More Equal and Sustainable Cities 21.7.2017 THE CITY FIX
Everyone, in one way or another, relies on clothing every day. Clothing is essential in keeping us warm and protecting us from the elements. It also has social implications: professional dress for work, social attire or a demonstration of individual ...
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A tale of two 'living' buildings in the Capitol 13.7.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Measuring the intangible value of two Living Building Challenge and WELL Building certifications in Washington, D.C.
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Why the Open Access Movement in Agriculture Matters 7.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Western discourse around open access has largely been restricted to academic, scholarly communications circles. In fact, many friends and colleagues have told me they first encountered open access when, after graduating from university, they were confronted with the fact they no longer had access to school databases; or when online article searches reached the dead-end prompt "click here to pay for access." The internet now provides a free platform for sharing knowledge. How is it possible -- or even socially just -- that so many of us can't get access to scholarly research? Isn't society propelled forward by access to the science, literature, and art of the world's scholars? What if that research is publically funded? These are the primary concerns that drive the open access movement. What would these concerns look like if we removed them from the scholarly communications circle and applied them to realms beyond the ivory tower like nature, society, technology, and ultimately the intersection of those ...
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Campesino Movements Say Climate Justice Is an Alternative to Devastating G20 Policies 5.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
As our communities in the global South and North contend with the social and environmental impacts of market-oriented policies, the gathering of world leaders this week in Hamburg, Germany for the G20 does not raise many positive expectations. This is no surprise given that G20 countries currently dominate the world's economic governance -- together accounting for 85 percent of the global GDP, and their economic growth centered priorities have mostly translated to environmental destruction, social conflict and the exploitation of the poor majority. Because of this, grassroots social justice movements find it imperative to organize transnationally -- in addition to strategic work at the local level -- to bring the voice of rural communities from across the world to international forums. Doing so offers an alternative vision of life by linking the question of food production to those of power and democracy. With the revolutionary concept of Food Sovereignty on the forefront, the peasant women and men of La ...
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Standing Rock's Fight Against Dakota Pipeline Continues While Tribe Plans for a Fossil-Free Future 4.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe recently won a major legal victory in federal court which may have the power to force the shutdown of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline. District Judge James Boasberg ruled Wednesday that the Trump administration failed to conduct an adequate environmental review of the pipeline, after President Trump ordered the Army Corps to fast-track and greenlight its approval. The judge requested additional briefings next week on whether the pipeline should be shut off until the completion of a full review of a potential oil spill's impacts on fishing and hunting rights, as well as environmental justice. The pipeline faced months of massive resistance from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, members of hundreds of other indigenous tribes from across the Americas, as well as non-Native allies. We speak with Standing Rock Sioux Chair Dave Archambault II and Nick Tilsen, executive director of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation and a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation ...
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Who Is Wilbur Ross? 3.7.2017 American Prospect
This article appears in the Summer 2017 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  The Senate confirmed Wilbur Ross as Trump’s new secretary of commerce by a vote of 72 to 27, with Democrats closely divided. Democrats are understandably conflicted over this appointment. A private-equity billionaire, Ross has also done deals with unions. He poses as a friend of labor, a savior of bankrupt companies, a creator of jobs, a turnaround wizard. He can sound like an economic nationalist. Now, as secretary of commerce, he is the architect of government policies to create jobs in this country. What will that mean? Ross is worth an estimated $2.5 billion to $2.9 billion, according to various industry estimates. He has made his billions by buying up struggling or bankrupt companies on the cheap. He has used bankruptcy laws to dump health and pension benefits for workers when buying distressed companies. He has relied on the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization to ...
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EPA Plans New Climate Science ‘Critique,’ Swapping Peer Review For Red Vs. Blue Politics 1.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Scientists, former agency officials and House Democrats fear the new program opens the door to more industry pseudoscience.
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Pastor Leads Lawsuit Opposing Bayou Bridge Pipeline to Protect Louisiana Cancer Alley Community 29.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Pastor Harry Joseph near oil storage tanks in St. James, close to the Mount Triumph Baptist Church. (Photo: Julie Dermansky / DeSmogBlog) Pastor Harry Joseph of the Mount Triumph Baptist Church in St. James, Louisiana, is taking  legal action  to prevent the  Bayou Bridge pipeline  from being built in his community, roughly 50 miles west of New Orleans. He is named as a plaintiff in a case filed by the  Tulane Environmental Law Clinic , petitioning the Parish Court to overturn  the coastal permit  that the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) gave Energy Transfer Partners, the company that built the controversial  Dakota Access pipeline.   The Bayou Bridge pipeline will be the last leg of the Dakota Access, carrying oil fracked in North Dakota to Louisiana. The final stretch of the project, if built, will span 162.5 miles from Lake Charles to St. James, cutting through the Atchafalaya Basin, a national heritage area and the country's largest wetland. This pipeline will transport crude oil from ...
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How cities are using clean energy commitments to prosper 29.6.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Jayant Kairam Cities have long been testing grounds for policy innovation. That identity is critical as we barrel headfirst into an urbanized world. As of 2014, 54 percent of the world’s population lived in urban areas, and the United Nations estimates that by 2050, over 6 billion people will live in cities . So, it only makes practical and economic sense that local leaders around the world have doubled-downed on addressing one of, if not the, biggest threats to humans and the planet we call home: climate change. In fact, over 300 U.S. mayors have reaffirmed their commitment to meet the climate reduction goals set forth in the 2016 Paris Agreement. Leading American cities After President Trump called out Pittsburgh in his announcement to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, the city announced its plan to go 100 percent renewable. The “Steel City” is among a rapidly growing cohort of global urban centers in red and blue states, and in the developing and developed world, that have committed to act ...
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Exit Interview: Peter Seligmann, Conservation International 27.6.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The co-founder of the global environmental nonprofit reflects on 30 years of growth and change as he prepares to step down.
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How your local lawmaker voted 25.6.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Here’s how area members of Congress voted on major issues in the week ending June 23.
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Dissidents Ramp Up Direct Action Against Climate Destroyers. Who Will the Courts Defend? 22.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The seven climate activists convicted in district courts this month were not allowed to present a "climate necessity" defense for their acts of civil disobedience. But the growing movement of climate activism against the fossil fuel industry and its political enablers is determined to keep the fight going in the courts until "climate necessity" becomes an acceptable defense. In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout by clicking here. This month a group of climate activists were convicted in district courts in  Mount Vernon, Washington , and  Wawayanda, New York , for committing acts of civil disobedience against fossil fuel infrastructure. Each defendant (one in Washington and six in New York) had attempted to present a " climate necessity defense ," arguing that their nominally illegal actions were justified by the threat of climate catastrophe -- in other words, that the real crime is ...
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A public-private recipe for sustainable urban development 19.6.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
The private sector is eager to help address the challenges of rapid urbanization. Here's how the United Nations Global Compact is helping inspire collaboration with cities and community governments.
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Utahns turn art into activism: ‘When we dance, we can’t help but feel part of nature’ 16.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Throughout history, artistic expression has been a catalyst for political activism — using creativity to bring awareness to social ills and sometimes proposing solutions. This summer, Utah’s dancers are taking steps to bring attention to climate change, land conservation and respect for nature. As part of the nation’s burgeoning environmental arts movement, three Salt Lake City dance projects highlight sustainability issues through innovative aesthetic experiences in Utah’s vast open lands and i... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Just like social causes, environmentalism is about putting people first 15.6.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Kate Zerrenner The 85th Texas Regular Legislative Session has drawn to a close. Now that we've had some time to digest what went down (and get some sleep), we can reflect. There is no doubt: This was a very hard Session. Emotions were high and lives were at stake. Each Session ends up having themes or issues that remain high on the priority list throughout the five months legislators are in Austin. This year, the focus was on social issues, like transgender bathroom access and reproductive rights. And although the connection may not always be obvious, social issues are environmental issues, too. All of these matters are fundamentally about people. When I fight for clean energy or water or taking action on climate change, I'm not doing it in a vacuum. We cannot disconnect these issues with the social issues we face in Texas and on a national scale right now. Immigration, health care, and education are all about protecting the most vulnerable among us and ensuring we treat each other with respect – and ...
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