User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: General
Last updated: Jun 22 2017 21:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Dissidents Ramp Up Direct Action Against Climate Destroyers. Who Will the Courts Defend? 22.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The seven climate activists convicted in district courts this month were not allowed to present a "climate necessity" defense for their acts of civil disobedience. But the growing movement of climate activism against the fossil fuel industry and its political enablers is determined to keep the fight going in the courts until "climate necessity" becomes an acceptable defense. In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout by clicking here. This month a group of climate activists were convicted in district courts in  Mount Vernon, Washington , and  Wawayanda, New York , for committing acts of civil disobedience against fossil fuel infrastructure. Each defendant (one in Washington and six in New York) had attempted to present a " climate necessity defense ," arguing that their nominally illegal actions were justified by the threat of climate catastrophe -- in other words, that the real crime is ...
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A public-private recipe for sustainable urban development 19.6.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
The private sector is eager to help address the challenges of rapid urbanization. Here's how the United Nations Global Compact is helping inspire collaboration with cities and community governments.
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Utahns turn art into activism: ‘When we dance, we can’t help but feel part of nature’ 16.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Throughout history, artistic expression has been a catalyst for political activism — using creativity to bring awareness to social ills and sometimes proposing solutions. This summer, Utah’s dancers are taking steps to bring attention to climate change, land conservation and respect for nature. As part of the nation’s burgeoning environmental arts movement, three Salt Lake City dance projects highlight sustainability issues through innovative aesthetic experiences in Utah’s vast open lands and i... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Just like social causes, environmentalism is about putting people first 15.6.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Kate Zerrenner The 85th Texas Regular Legislative Session has drawn to a close. Now that we've had some time to digest what went down (and get some sleep), we can reflect. There is no doubt: This was a very hard Session. Emotions were high and lives were at stake. Each Session ends up having themes or issues that remain high on the priority list throughout the five months legislators are in Austin. This year, the focus was on social issues, like transgender bathroom access and reproductive rights. And although the connection may not always be obvious, social issues are environmental issues, too. All of these matters are fundamentally about people. When I fight for clean energy or water or taking action on climate change, I'm not doing it in a vacuum. We cannot disconnect these issues with the social issues we face in Texas and on a national scale right now. Immigration, health care, and education are all about protecting the most vulnerable among us and ensuring we treat each other with respect – and ...
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Utah dancers choreograph programs to bring attention to environmental issues 15.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Throughout history, artistic expression has been a catalyst for political activism — using creativity to bring awareness to social ills and sometimes proposing solutions. This summer, Utah’s dancers are taking steps to bring attention to climate change, land conservation and respect for nature. As part of the nation’s burgeoning environmental arts movement, three Salt Lake City dance projects highlight sustainability issues through innovative aesthetic experiences in Utah’s vast open lands and i...
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No, Palm Oil Is Not Responsible For 40% Of Global Deforestation 8.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Victor Baron , Cirad ; Alain Rival , Cirad , and Raphael Marichal , Cirad A little over a month ago, Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Ministry sought to extend a moratorium on issuing new licenses for using forest and peatland in the country for two years. Indonesia faces a massive ecological issue as its forests are rapidly disappearing and palm oil has been blamed for it. Indeed, the palm oil industry symbolizes tensions between the urgent need to preserve natural spaces and the necessary support for economic development in the global South. Palm is an exceptional oleaginous crop with an unequaled oil yield per hectare. It produces an abundant and inexpensive multi-purpose oil , which is sought by both the agro-food and biofuels industries. When properly developed and managed, palm oil plantations can play an important role in improving livelihoods and eradicating poverty in the tropics’ rural areas. The World Bank estimates that with a population increase of 11.6% and a 5% increase in per capita ...
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Remembering John Dillon 8.6.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Jennifer Henry John Dillon, KAIROS Canada's long-serving researcher and policy analyst on the global economy, human rights and ecological justice passed away on June 5. John served the Canadian churches in ecumenical social justice for 44 years. He was a researcher, writer, analyst, but most importantly a persistent and faithful advocate for marginalized peoples everywhere. It was to the needs and concerns of women, Indigenous peoples, poor communities, and the cries of the earth that he held himself to account. "It is almost impossible to imagine the ecumenical coalitions, and now KAIROS, without him. John so vitally shaped our identity and commitments," says KAIROS' Executive Director, Jennifer Henry, who began working with John in the early 1990s. John never sought recognition for his work. And yet his research and policy analysis was the cornerstone of so many successful ecumenical advocacy and education campaigns for social change. As Amnesty International's Kathy Price said, "John did the quiet, ...
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Madagascar's lemurs lurch toward extinction, but there could be a way to save them 7.6.2017 L.A. Times - World News

The road to Maromizaha Forest in Madagascar winds through hills dotted with charred stumps resembling broken teeth.

Trucks roar past a woman named Madeleine, who sits by the road chipping away at granite slabs, making gravel.

The hills above were once covered in trees, teeming with shrieking lemurs....

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Race Is At The Heart Of The New Faith-Driven Environmental Justice 5.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A quiet but powerful march took place in Philadelphia last week, indicating a new direction in the faith-driven environmental justice movement in America.  A coalition of climate activists and poverty activists walked through five counties and ended in Philadelphia to demand increases in solar power and the jobs it provides. The event, called  Power Local Green Jobs , was the brainchild of Earth Quaker Action Team ( EQUAT  ) and Philadelphians Organized to Witness Empower and Rebuild ( POWER ), a group consisting of more than 40 congregations around the city and led by Reverend Greg Holston, an African American pastor who is intent on making the connection between economic and environmental justice.  “Every single day, folks tell me about struggling to support their families. They need jobs, not programs. It’s time to build a green city that works for all,” ― Rev. Greg Holston Rev. Holston was joined in the march by Bishop Dwayne Royster of  Living Water United Church of Christ , another Black faith ...
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The 2017 GreenBiz 30 Under 30 5.6.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
This year's crop of young professionals from around the world are tackling the biggest sustainability challenges — inside companies, academe, media and the nonprofit sector.
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Trump's remarks on pulling out of climate accord 2.6.2017 AP Politics
President Donald Trump&apos;s remarks Thursday in the Rose Garden in which he announced the U.S. was pulling out of the Paris accord, as provided by the White House:...
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Truthout and Earth Island Journal Investigate America's Toxic Prisons 1.6.2017 Truthout.com
For many people in the United States, the prison is invisible. How is this possible, given that the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world, with more than 2.3 million people behind bars? The answer is that prison, as an institution, relies on its own invisibility -- its ability to disappear human beings. Prisons are often stowed away in isolated rural areas and small towns. A large number of people in the US -- particularly, those who aren't part of the communities most impacted by incarceration -- simply avert their eyes. Activist and scholar Angela Davis explains that prison is viewed as a repository for societal problems, especially those that stem from racism and capitalism. She writes, "The prison has become a black hole into which the detritus of capitalism is deposited." In many prisons around the country, the "detritus" is literal. Prisons are sites of some of the worst environmental injustices in this country. Over the past year, Truthout and Earth Island Journal have undertaken an ...
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How climate laws can catalyze more equitable cities 1.6.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Environmental justice advocates are working to ensure California's efforts to combat climate change benefit everyone — and then applied nationwide.
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Hilcorp Runs Aground: Pipeline Ruptures Expose Fractures in Billionaire's Energy Companies 30.5.2017 Truthout.com
A window into Hilcorp's operations provides a peek into the likely impact of the Trump administration's "streamlining" and eliminating regulations for energy producers. (Photo: nate'sgirl / Flickr ; Edited: JR / TO ) The only way Truthout can maintain a sanctuary for real, independent news is with your support. Make a tax-deductible donation today! Houston multibillionaire Jeffery Hildebrand has a big problem brewing in Alaska, where one of his Hilcorp Energy companies has presided over two pipeline breaks in the ecologically rich Cook Inlet since December. After decades of flying under media and public scrutiny, Hildebrand finds his Hilcorp Alaska operation in the limelight. It's struggling to keep 50-year-old underwater pipelines in the treacherous inlet intact -- and at the same time eke out a profit from a depleted oilfield. It wasn't supposed to turn out this way. When he began investing more than $4 billion in Alaska in 2011, oil prices were above $100 a barrel, and Alaska was handing out billions ...
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Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan herald the clean money revolution 27.5.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
As trillions of dollars are shifting towards generative practices, momentum towards socially responsible investing is gaining in the wealth management industry.
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Activists Clayton Thomas-Müller and Vandana Shiva connect climate and social justice 25.5.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Resh Budhu The Tommy Douglas Institute at George Brown College invites educational communities and wider communities to explore progressive ideas and critical perspectives on educating and organizing for change in the 21st century. Now, in its fifth year, we focus on the single most important issue of our time, the environment -- and the need to connect climate justice to social justice. On Wednesday May 31, environmental justice activists Clayton Thomas-Müller and Vandana Shiva will speak on this year's theme, Social Justice = Environmental Justice: Rethink! Reclaim! Respect! It's 2017 and eight billionaires own as much wealth as the world's bottom 50 per cent and two-thirds of wildlife will disappear by 2020. Winters have never been warmer and precarious jobs, divisive politics, gender-based violence and urban poverty continue to thrive. More people are being displaced by war and want, while once immortal icebergs melt into the oceans. Are they connected? Of course they are. As Clayton Thomas-Müller ...
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"Clean This Place, Don't Displace": Activists Battle for Environmental Justice in Washington, DC 19.5.2017 Truthout.com
April 25, 2016, protest of soccer stadium groundbreaking residents from Syphax Gardens, Q St. Corridor and Greenleaf. (Photo: Kari Fulton) Following the People's Climate March, Washington, DC residents have redoubled their fight for better air quality and to protect public housing in their gentrifying city. In particular, residents of Buzzard Point, a majority low-income African American community, are organizing to confront the proliferation of toxins from construction projects, such as the DC United Soccer Stadium. Buzzard Point in southwest DC is at risk of riverine and coastal flooding due to climate change. Of the ward's 84,000 residents, 93.3 percent are people of color. A series of development projects like the DC United Soccer Stadium, while at face value a boon for economic growth, unearth decades of toxicity in Buzzard Point, exposing community members to harmful substances while at the same time threatening to push out low- and middle-income residents. April 25, 2016, protest of soccer stadium ...
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Why Trump's combative trade stance makes US farmers nervous 19.5.2017 AP Top News
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A sizable majority of rural Americans backed Donald Trump&apos;s presidential bid, drawn to his calls to slash environmental rules, strengthen law enforcement and replace the federal health care law....
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Under Trump, inconvenient data is being sidelined 14.5.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Workplace violations, climate, animal welfare and ethics records are less accessible.
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What Will Trump Deliver on Trade? 10.5.2017 American Prospect
AP Photo/Eric Gay A worker uses a lift to move rolls of sheet metal at LMS International, in Laredo, Texas.  President Trump appears to be serious about changing the terms of U.S. trade deals, having recently drawn up an executive order to withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to show that he means business about renegotiating the deal. But will President Trump change trade deals to make North American citizens and workers better off—or just business?  NAFTA, which drastically cut tariffs and liberalized financial flows, but did not harmonize social standards, was sold to the American public as a deal where, according to the Peterson Institute for International Economics, “U.S. exports to Mexico will continue to outstrip Mexican exports to the United States,” where Mexico would finally “ export goods, not people ” and all parties would be better off. There is now a consensus that NAFTA was oversold. The U.S. has a glaring trade deficit with Mexico, NAFTA put downward pressure on ...
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