User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: General
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California Raises the Bar with Ambitious Climate Legislation 24.8.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
California Raises the Bar with Ambitious Climate Legislation
Climate Change This Week: Heating Up, Melting Away, Upping Wind Power, and More! 24.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Saving BUB, Beautiful Unique Biodiversity, like this Jeweled Flower Mantis found in Asian forests, is another reason to save these important ecosystems. Source Pinterest Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon OO Malaysia: Sarawak Establishes 2+ Million Acres Of Protected Areas and may add 1.1 million more... now will these truly be protected from illegal deforestation? Stay tuned, folks. <> Credit Dan at freedigitalphotos.net OO Rising Temperatures Stunt Tree Growth new research finds iconic Douglas firs across the West are water- and heat-stressed. Rising Temperatures Fuel Fires - the Sobranes, CA wildfire has destroyed nearly 70,000 acres of forest and destroyed over 40 homes. Source www.wcvb.com OO 43 Large US West Wildfires as of August 24, 2016 shows the US Forest Service wildfire map. OO New England Is Being Deforested since the 1980s due to expansion of affluent suburbs, says a new study; since then 5% of its forests has been ...
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Forget GMOs. Pesticides Pose the Real Risk 23.8.2016 American Prospect
A tractor spreads chemicals on his crop as Hastings, Florida, resident Brian Hunt watches.    The latest statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture reveal that Americans’ appetite for locally grown, organic food is growing. Consumers want to know where their food comes from and what’s in it. Most polls show that the vast majority of Americans also support mandatory labels for genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. Nearly half of Americans think scientists have found risks associated with eating GM foods even though they haven’t, according to a recent survey by the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. “People don’t know very much about the science, and they don’t know that GMOs have been in the food supply for 20 years,” says William Hallman, who ran the survey. “They just know they don’t like it.” Last month, after years of contentious debate, President Obama signed legislation requiring the first national GMO labeling standard. (Labeling advocates aren’t happy with the ...
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Corporate Conquistadors Violate Indigenous Lands and Bodies 22.8.2016 Truthout.com
Recently, KWG Resources Incorporated, a Canadian mining company, posted a video online using women dressed in bikinis to promote the mining of chromite on Indigenous lands in northern Ontario, known as the Ring of Fire. KWG President Frank Smeenk defended his company's actions saying " sex sells ." Perhaps this was the most honest statement of those in the industry. Mining is about exploitation -- not just of the minerals in the ground, but of women as well. For decades, the primary focus of anti-mining, logging and oil and gas activists has been on the environmental destruction left behind by the extractive industry. It is also a fact that Indigenous peoples worldwide are disproportionately impacted by environmental destruction in their territories caused by these companies with the approval of state governments. Environmental racism has put all the profits in the hands of corporations at the expense of the health of peoples, plants and animals. What is less known by the general public are the very ...
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A big question complicating the climate debate: Where's the money for poor people? 22.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

In early 2015, Democratic members of the state Assembly huddled in a Cal State Sacramento conference room to hear Mary Nichols, chair of the powerful Air Resources Board, explain how her agency handles the billions of dollars collected from California’s marquee program to fight climate change. 

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Blue Cities Battle Red States 22.8.2016 American Prospect
This article appears in our Summer 2016 issue. Subscribe here .  When Denton, Texas, passed a fracking ban in November 2014, it was national news. The story seemed out of a movie, a David-and-Goliath tale in which a scrappy band of citizens goes up against big industry and wins. Located in the heart of oil and gas territory, the town is hardly a liberal bastion; its state representative is a staunch conservative, and among its biggest annual events is the North Texas State Fair and Rodeo. But residents were watching gas drills come closer and closer to their parks and schools. Adam Briggle, a professor at the University of North Texas in Denton, found himself attending more and more meetings as he tried to understand the environmental impact of fracking, a process used to extract oil and natural gas from the ground. Tara Linn Hunter, a music teacher, found herself with debilitating adult asthma, a condition she attributed at least partly to pollution generated by the efforts to get natural gas. After the ...
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Tunisia: On the Front Lines of the Struggle Against Climate Change 21.8.2016 Truthout.com
Kerkennah is a group of islands lying off the east coast of Tunisia in the Gulf of Gabès, around 20km away from the mainland city of Sfax. The two main islands are Chergui and Gharbi. When approaching the islands by ferry, one is struck by a curious sight: the coastal waters are divided into countless parcels, separated from one another by thousands of palm tree leaves. This is what Kerkennis call charfia, a centuries-old fishing method ingeniously designed to lure fish into a capture chamber from where they can be easily recovered. As the land is arid, agricultural activity is limited to subsistence farming. For the islanders fishing is one of the key economic activities, but for big multinational corporations it is the exploitation of oil and gas. Despite a new article in the Tunisian constitution stipulating state sovereignty over natural resources and transparency in the related contracts, oil and gas companies continue to garner obscene profits and enjoy impunity. At the same time, local communities ...
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This Town Is Sick of Drinking Polluted Water 19.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Michelle Chen

In Alabama’s Black Belt, a region where the vestiges of slavery still manifest in chronic poverty and crumbling infrastructure, a more recent legacy of mining and industry is haunting the land through poisoned waterways and toxic soil.

Yet the region has long been the rural core of civil-rights struggles, and along the Black Belt, local citizens are trying to revive a legacy of activism as they struggle to restore their environment.

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Bill Bryant’s challenge: Topple Washington’s dynasty of Democratic governors 12.8.2016 Seattle Times: Local

GOP challenger Bill Bryant has an uphill climb to unseat Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee. He’s introducing himself as a moderate with environmental, education and business credentials while downplaying his GOP ties - and avoiding talk of Donald Trump.
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Demanding Protection From Fossil Fuels 10.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The fossil fuel industry has been at the center of the climate change debate, for good reason. We urgently need to transition from fossil fuels to clean, renewable energy sources in order to stave off catastrophic climate disaster. There's also another urgent reason to make the shift from fossil fuels: the industry's toxic operations pose unacceptable health threats to our children and families. Researcher Frederica Perera at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health recently noted that fossil fuel emissions pose grave dangers to children's health, both from pollution and from the health effects from climate change. Her review concludes that: "(B)y sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life-course and potentially across generations." In addition, a review by ...
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Meet the California Couple Who Uses More Water Than Every Home in Los Angeles Combined 9.8.2016 Mother Jones
Rafaela Tijerina first met la señora at a school in the town of Lost Hills, deep in the farm country of California's Central Valley. They were both there for a school board meeting, and the superintendent had failed to show up. Tijerina, a 74-year-old former cotton picker and veteran school board member, apologized for the superintendent—he must have had another important meeting—and for the fact that her own voice was faint; she had cancer. "Oh no, you talk great," the woman replied with a warm smile, before she began handing out copies of her book, Rubies in the Orchard : How to Uncover the Hidden Gems in Your Business. "To my friend with the sweet voice," she wrote inside Tijerina's copy. Jonathan Becker/Contour by Getty Images It was only later that Tijerina realized the woman owned the almond groves where Tijerina's husband worked as a pruner. Lynda Resnick and her husband, Stewart, also own a few other things: Teleflora, the nation's largest flower delivery service; Fiji Water, the best-selling ...
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The Frackopoly Comes to Power 4.8.2016 Truthout.com
Anti-fracking activists display a sign during a march in New York City on September 24, 2014. (Photo: Joe Brusky ) What risks does hydraulic fracturing, known as fracking, pose to human health and our environment? How has the fracking industry gained such power and influence in the United States? And how can we stop it? These are the questions tackled by longtime public interest advocate Wenonah Hauter in Frackopoly. Click here to order the book now with a donation to Truthout! The following is an excerpt from Frackopoly: The Battle for the Future of Energy and the Environment: "I think they [the Obama administration] genuinely believe that we can go back to medieval times and have windmills. They truly believe we can have windmills, solar energy, and of course, as you know, that will just take us back to a medieval economy."—Steve Forbes, CEO of Forbes In 1964, a group of wealthy funders instigated a radical insurgency that reshaped the political landscape and weakened democracy. Although their ...
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How to fight neoliberalism without giving way to despair 28.7.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. This is an epilogue to Ed Finn's three-part series examining the ideology of neoliberalism and the enormous harm its implementation imposes on people and the planet. "Men are seldom blessed with good fortune and good sense at the same time." -- Titus Livius ...
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ALEC 2016 Agenda Boosts Charters, Coal and Other Corporate Funders 27.7.2016 Truthout.com
ALEC has long relied on funding from its coal and oil industry members. This year it's proposing yet another resolution opposing the Clean Power Plan. (Photo: Rich / Flickr ) At Truthout, we refuse to subject you to ads or "sponsored content" -- we believe in producing journalism with integrity. If you agree, please support us with a donation today! The  American Legislative Exchange Council  will push bills to protect failing charter schools, silence political speech, and obstruct environmental protections in the ALEC 2016 agenda introduced at its annual meeting in Indianapolis this week. ALEC faces renewed public attention as it gears up for the annual meeting, where corporate lobbyists sit side-by-side with state legislators in luxury hotels to vote as equals on "model bills" that then get pushed to become law in states across the country. As the Center for Media and Democracy  has reported , Donald Trump chose an ALEC ally, Indiana Governor Mike Pence, as his running mate, while his party's 2016 ...
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Putting food issues on politicians’ plates 27.7.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Politically, the ubiquity of food is both a strength and a weakness. Food can be a hunger issue, an immigration issue, an animal-welfare issue, a labor issue, an environmental issue, a farming issue, a health issue, a trade issue.
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EPA Admits Airplane Pollution’s Climate Danger But Drags Feet on Emissions Rules 26.7.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

After nine years of delay, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today officially acknowledged in a so-called “endangerment finding” that planet-warming pollution from airplanes disrupts the climate and endangers human welfare. But the agency failed to move forward on rules to actually reduce aircraft emissions.

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As DNC Delegates Gather in the ‘Birthplace of Democracy’, Local Communities Fight for their Right to Breathe 25.7.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Emma Pike

From July 25th-29th 2016, South Philadelphia will be home to the Democratic National Convention. The DNC’s location this year will no doubt be repeatedly referenced by delegates and reporters from across the nation and beyond, with much to be made of the city’s prominent role in America’s early struggle for democracy and freedom. What is unlikely to be discussed at the convention - or given coverage by either national or international media - is the reality of everyday life for Philadelphians, and the rights and freedoms that we are still fighting for.

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Earth's Climate Is Warming -- And We Can Fix It! 25.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The scientific community has long reached a consensus that human activities are altering the Earth's climate system. According to IPCC, the average Earth surface temperature has increased by 0.7 ± 0.2°C since the late 19th century, and is projected to rise another 1.5 to 6°C by 2100 without additional mitigation measures. Currently, global climate change has become the greatest threats to humanity. Due to the underlying complexity of climate system, potential consequences of climate change encompass a broad range of health and ecological implications that across national boundaries and beyond intergenerational limits, including spread of human infectious diseases, destruction of tropical coral reefs, extreme and unusual weather events, shrinking mountain glaciers, rising sea level, and accelerated species extinction. It is not merely an issue for people within a specific geographic location, but a threat to all mankind that living on Earth, and a catastrophic crisis to current and future generations. ...
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How Utah Coal Interests Helped Push a Secret Plan to Export Coal From California 24.7.2016 Truthout - All Articles
This story was originally published on July 21, 2016 at High Country News ( hcn.org ). On June 27, hundreds of people packed the Oakland City Council meeting where a proposal to ban the transport of coal through the California city was up for a vote. Speakers on both sides of the issue delivered passionate arguments, pitting the promise of good jobs in a depressed area against concern about environmental impacts. The meeting quickly became rowdy. "There was a lot of tension," says Rev. Ken Chambers, pastor of West Side Missionary Baptist Church in West Oakland, who spoke in support of the ban. Pro-coal supporters stationed in the audience heckled him throughout his address, and at times, Lynette Gibson McElhaney, the council president, struggled to maintain order. "Officers," she requested, "please escort those persons who continue to have disrespectful outbursts outside of the chamber." The vote came after more than a year of heated debate over plans to build a marine terminal, from which coal mined in ...
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How Individualist Economics Are Causing Planetary Eco-Collapse 21.7.2016 Truthout.com
Capitalist economics can offer no solution to the impending ecological collapse because the crisis is the product of the same dynamic of competition-driven production for market that generates the ever-greater accumulation of wealth and consumption that Smithian economists celebrate. A selection from the cover of Green Capitalism: The God That Failed. (Image: WEA Books) For some in the environmental movement, it has been tempting to believe that "innovation" and free market solutions could address the challenge of climate disruption. In his provocative and robustly argued book Green Capitalism: The God That Failed, Richard Smith shows why that idea is a myth. Click here to order this important book today with a donation to Truthout! The following is an abridged excerpt from the essay "How did the common good become a bad idea? The eco-suicidal economics of Adam Smith," in Green Capitalism: The God That Failed. While capitalism has brought unprecedented development, this same motor of development is now ...
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