User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Social Justice
Last updated: Nov 14 2018 24:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 96,081    
In the #MeToo era, should Minnesota schools be teaching consent? 13.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Advocates say they're not giving up their push for schools to teach the principles of consent — the earlier, the better.
Also found in: [+]
Q&A: Vietnam and the Road to Disaster 13.11.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo Marines unloading and moving through a tree and branch strewn landing zone in South Vietnam on December 17, 1969.  roadtodisaster_cover.jpg Equipped fresh insights from the fields of cognitive science and psychology, Brian VanDeMark’s Road to Disaster: A New History of America’s Descent Into Vietnam examines how Lyndon Johnson and his Vietnam advisors, “best and the brightest,” as David Halberstam’s famously called them in seminal  work,  unspooled the decisions that cost the lives of more than 58,000 Americans. VanDeMark, an associate professor of history at the U.S. Naval Academy, has taught courses on the Vietnam War for nearly 30 years. As a young historian, he assisted Robert McNamara, Lyndon Johnson’s Secretary of Defense, with his controversial 1995  memoir  on the war and got to know other senior advisors like Clark Clifford, McNamara’s successor.  After Vietnam, Americans embraced a less jaundiced view of veterans and military service, but VanDeMark also tells The American Prospect that ...
Also found in: [+]
As construction of Keystone XL is paused, tribes brace for what's next 10.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
This week a federal judge in Montana temporarily blocked TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline. Indigenous activist Angeline Cheek considers a temporary win — "but also," she says, "our fight is never over."
Also found in: [+]
Local Officials Paid a Price on Tuesday for Cooperating with ICE 9.11.2018 American Prospect
Local law enforcement officials’ cooperation with federal immigration enforcement was on the ballot on Tuesday in counties in Maryland, North Carolina, New York, and Minnesota. In a range of local elections, voters ousted officials who had assisted or worked alongside Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to implement President Trump’s war on immigrants.  The election results are a coup for organizers and activists who have been working to make clear the link between the president’s harsh immigration agenda and small-town politics. Their electoral victories may provide a model for future grassroots efforts to curtail abusive policies towards immigrants.  Just days after taking office, President Trump issued an  executive order  directing federal officials to pursue more 287(g) agreements, which allow for participating state and local law enforcement officers to enforce immigration law after receiving training from ICE. Officers deputized under the program are allowed inquire about the immigration ...
Also found in: [+]
U's underground archives document prejudice, work during World War I 9.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
As the world marks 100 years since the Armistice ending World War I this weekend, the archivists at the University of Minnesota tend a huge collection. Included are the stories of the YMCA volunteers who helped during the war, and accounts of the infamous public safety committee in Minnesota that ferreted out anyone who was "unpatriotic".
Also found in: [+]
A Beautiful World: Want to save the world? Educate girls 6.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A documentary film sparked a global movement to end poverty by educating the world's girls.
Also found in: [+]
How One Democratic Representative Transforms Young Progressives into Electoral Activists 5.11.2018 American Prospect
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/via AP Images Representative Jamie Raskin talks with students who were gathered on the east lawn of the Capitol to call for Congress to act on gun control.  If research by the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics offers any clue, and there’s no reason to think it doesn’t, after the polls close on Tuesday roughly 40 percent of 18 to 29-year-olds will have voted—a rate almost twice as high as it’s ever been for a midterm election. What’s more, because Harvard’s poll shows that 66 percent of them favor Democratic control of Congress, their votes may well play an important role in flipping some of the swing districts whose names have now been burned into our memories.  And yet, even though many Millenials have been involved in political campaigns over the course of the year, few may leave with the skills and the commitment to become more politically engaged after the ballots are counted.  There is, however, one initiative that’s showing how to change that equation. It’s ...
Also found in: [+]
Planned Parenthood — the New Election-Day Giant 5.11.2018 American Prospect
Most people either weren’t home or were ignoring the Saturday-morning knocks on their doors. But the Planned Parenthood volunteers, their pink hats and T-shirts contrasting brightly with the blue-gray sky over Norristown, Pennsylvania, were undeterred. The dozen canvassers who arrived in Norristown, a working-class, racially diverse borough just outside of Philadelphia, on a cool and breezy October morning were a mix of seasoned volunteer door-knockers, Planned Parenthood staff, and newcomers who hadn’t been of voting age in the 2016 presidential election. Before dividing up into pairs, veteran canvasser Manny Lampon showed Abby Peabody and Sophie Auerbach, both 19, how to use an app called Minivan to record information about their interactions. Conveying lessons he’d learned in his years of talking to total strangers, Lampon went through the script. It was less than three weeks before the midterm elections, and the canvassers were talking to Norristown residents about supporting the re-election of ...
Also found in: [+]
Ottawa school board needs to fully engage black community 3.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Richard Sharpe “We are so proud of how your group has advocated for your community.” This comment, made by an Ottawa Carleton District School Board (OCDSB) superintendent, was directed at me after I had given a presentation on the need for race-based data to support anti-racism initiatives in the school board. A coalition of black community members had begun interventions at the OCDSB over a year ago to push for direct engagement on equity issues. The official’s comment was made in reference to the board’s response to our demands. However, I couldn’t help but interpret it as a figurative pat on the head. It is not what we are looking for. I became involved in school board issues last year, when my son was added to the long list of black youth suspended from Ottawa schools. He was suspended for challenging an administrator over what he believed to be racial profiling. As I sought community support to deal with the suspension, I was struck by the fact that almost every black family I encountered had ...
Also found in: [+]
Can the Progressive Coalition Beat Trump? 1.11.2018 American Prospect
Mark Vancleave/Star Tribune via AP Minnesota Representative Ilhan Omar, center, celebrates with her supporters after her Congressional Fifth District primary victory in Minneapolis.  democracy_rules.jpg President Donald Trump has gotten extraordinary political mileage out of stoking the fears and prejudices of the predominantly white male voters who form the core of his supporters. Now the question is whether the progressive coalition at the heart of the Democratic base—including African Americans, immigrants, young voters, and women—can turn out in sufficient numbers on Election Day to reassert that most Americans value inclusion over hate, facts over lies, equity over greed, and government accountability over corruption. Too often, when talk turns to this “Rainbow Coalition,” a term first coined Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton and later taken up by civil rights leader Jesse Jackson, progressive strategists wring their hands over the supposed pitfalls of “identity politics,” which are said to  ...
Also found in: [+]
Google employees plan global walkout to protest company's treatment of women 1.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Many at Google have been simmering since The New York Times reported the company gave generous exit packages to alleged harassers. Hundreds of employees have already walked out in Singapore.
Also found in: [+]
St. Thomas holds campus-wide forum to discuss racism 31.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The St. Paul university held a meeting Wednesday afternoon to address racism on campus. Earlier this month, an African-American freshman living in a dorm found an offensive message with a racial slur on his door.
Also found in: [+]
Mourning and protests as Pittsburgh begins victims' burials 31.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Funerals continue on Wednesday with Melvin Wax, Irving Younger and Joyce Fienberg being laid to rest.
Also found in: [+]
Women Bolster the Democrats’ Midwestern Prospects 31.10.2018 American Prospect
Meet Nicole Breadon. She’s 46, a lifelong resident of Clarkston, a town of fewer than 1,000 that’s become one of Detroit’s distant exurbs. Her husband Todd grew up in Clarkston, too. Breadon, a sous chef, left her job six years ago to spend more time with her two sons, both special needs children. She’s also an archetype of lasting change in Michigan Democratic politics. “I wasn’t politically active before Trump’s election, but afterwards I felt I had to fight,” Breadon says. “I was concerned that because of him—and especially Betsy DeVos—my children and other kids in the special education system wouldn’t receive the services they need.”  Paying careful attention to Trump’s post-election pronouncements and appointments, in mid-January, 2017 Breadon joined the North Oakland County Democratic Club.  Then, only a few days later, came an event that left a lasting impression on Breadon: the January 21 Women’s March. She took part in the March on the Michigan Capitol in Lansing, one of the many local offshoots ...
Also found in: [+]
The Cross-Border Farmworker Rebellion 31.10.2018 American Prospect
Surrounded by blueberry and alfalfa fields near Sumas, Washington, just a few miles from the Canadian border, a group of workers last week stood in a circle behind a trailer, itemizing a long list of complaints about the grower they work for. Lorenzo Sanchez, the oldest, pointed to the trailer his family rents for $800 a month. On one side, the wooden steps and porch have rotted through. “The toilet backs up,” he said. “Water leaks in when it rains. The stove doesn't work.” His wife, Felipa Lopez, described mistreatment in the fields. “The old man [the grower] sometimes walks behind us and makes fun of us,” she charged. “He yells at us to make us work faster.” Other workers in the circle nodded in agreement. Ramon Torres, president of the farmworker union Familias Unidas por la Justicia, listened and then took union membership cards from the pocket of his jacket. “This is the first step,” he said. “Join the union. But you have to agree to support each other in this. If he fires any one of you, the others ...
Also found in: [+]
Making American Democracy Representative 29.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Americans are starting to catch on to the fact that our system of “first past the post” plurality voting in single-member districts can lead to perverse results. The citizens of Maine, for example, got stuck with an unpopular reactionary governor, Paul LePage, after he was elected in 2010 with just 38 percent of the vote in a three-way race. Out of frustration, Mainers have since instituted an alternative system called ranked-choice voting (RCV). With RCV, voters do not just pick one candidate; they rank all the candidates in order of preference, from most favored to least favored. The candidate with the most first-choice votes wins outright only if he or she gets a majority of those votes. Otherwise, voters’ second choices come into play. (See sidebar below.) In a moderately conservative state like Maine, RCV would usually mean a more centrist or middle-of-the-road official would win, rather than the ...
Also found in: [+]
Food stamps for soda: Time to end billion-dollar subsidy for sugary drinks? 29.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
SNAP provides nutrition assistance for about 42 million Americans, but critics say now is the time to restructure the $70 billion annual program in a way that promotes healthier food choices.
Also found in: [+]
Parents protest after Minnesota school drops fall holiday celebrations 29.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A Minnesota elementary school's decision to move away from fall and Halloween celebrations has reignited a debate about whether and how schools should celebrate holidays.
Also found in: [+]
Class Consciousness Comes to America 29.10.2018 American Prospect
Rosedale Avenue is a quiet street in Columbus, Ohio, with compact houses that are showing some wear. I recently spent an evening talking with some of the residents on their doorsteps about their jobs, the economy and the future. Tom, a friendly 23-year old covered in tattoos, was just pulling up to his home with his wife Megan, 22, and their two toddlers. They’d been middle-school sweethearts and have been working hard to build a life. Tom makes $14 an hour working with a landscape company, but because it rained that day, he didn’t work and didn’t get paid. Megan works part-time for $11.50 an hour at a candy store at a seasonal job. “My generation is screwed,” Tom tells me. “They all live with their parents, playing video games. I’ve got 20 cousins like that. There are plenty of jobs—but not enough good jobs,” he continues. “Our parents had good jobs. We can’t pay the bills.” What would help? “I’d love to be in a union,” he says. “I’m fine paying dues—I’d be making more money. Unions would make the ...
Also found in: [+]
'You are safe now': Matthew Shepard laid to rest at National Cathedral 26.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Twenty years ago, the brutal killing of a young gay man in Laramie, Wyo., drew national attention and led to an expansion of a federal hate-crimes law.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 96,081