User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: EJ Projects
Last updated: Feb 14 2019 22:20 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 2,966    
Youth climate conference builds momentum around Canadian Green New Deal 14.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Sophia Reuss Several hundred youth are gathering in Ottawa to kick off a recurring youth climate conference called PowerShift. This year's event, called " PowerShift: Young and Rising ," is a four-day convergence starting February 14 that draws young people from across the country for workshops and keynote lectures by prominent activists like Kanahus Manuel, Harsha Walia, Derek Nepinak, and Romeo Saganash. Organizers say the aim of the conference is to galvanize youth around the climate change and Indigenous rights movements. This year's PowerShift comes amid the youth movement that led to the recent launch of the Green New Deal in the U.S. and an upcoming federal election. "This is a moment to bring youth together and organize them in the leadup to the federal election, to demand much bolder climate action from the federal government and the kind of bold Green New Deal that we're seeing coming out of the U.S.," said Emma Jackson, an organizer with Climate Justice Edmonton and 350 Canada, in an interview ...
Also found in: [+]
In allowing Line 3 appeal, Walz wades into most contentious issue yet 13.2.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Just a month into the job, Gov. Tim Walz waded into one of the state's most contentious battlegrounds Tuesday with the announcement that he will continue an appeal of an oil pipeline project his predecessor began last year.
Also found in: [+]
5 things to look for in the Green New Deal 6.2.2019 GreenBiz.com
From job losses to carbon taxes to just what clean energy means, anyway, here's what to watch in the new policy proposal.
Also found in: [+]
Inside the ‘rat hole’ mines where Indians risk their lives to find coal 26.1.2019 Los Angeles Times - Living Green

Abdul Alim spent less than a week working inside the 370-foot-deep coal mine before deciding he’d had enough. The pit was too dangerous, the risk of flooding too great, the safety equipment nonexistent.

When a boss brought him and other workers to a market one evening to buy supplies, Alim told...

Also found in: [+]
Why We Endorse the #GreenNewDeal, and How We Plan to Support It 24.1.2019 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines
The Organic Consumers Association (OCA) fully endorses the Green New Deal (GND) as the most promising policy-level vehicle for achieving the large-scale transition to an organic, regenerative food and farming system, while at the same time cleaning up the environment, advancing social justice, restoring urban and rural food and economic security, and restabilizing the climate. We believe the GND’s potential to achieve its goals hinges on whether its architects and proponents craft, support and fully fund programs and policies that will rapidly scale up both the transition to renewable energy alternatives and the transition to organic regenerative agriculture and land-use and land-restoration practices. To achieve these large-scale transitions will require the public support and political will to confront the corporate dominance of our democracy, perpetuated by lawmakers who take campaign donations from the fossil fuel and industrial agribusiness industries. Absent the necessary political will, we must ...
Also found in: [+]
A Carbon Tax in Washington State Seemed Like a Sure Thing. What Went Wrong? 23.1.2019 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by High Country News. It appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Early on election night, as a drizzly dusk settled over Seattle, I made my way to the Arctic Club, a hotel decorated with explorers’ maps and a fake polar bear—a fitting place to await the results on Washington’s carbon tax […]
Also found in: [+]
A Call for the Food Movement to Get Behind the Green New Deal 19.1.2019 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

The final months of 2018 will likely be remembered as the decisive moment when the global grassroots awakened to the life-or-death threat posed by global warming. With violent weather and climate disasters becoming the norm, and international scientists finally shedding their customary caution to report that we must drastically slash (by at least 45 percent) global greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, hundreds of millions of ordinary people across the world seemed to simultaneously wake up.

Young climate activists under the banner of the Sunrise Movement in the U.S. and the Extinction Rebellion in the UK and other countries, sat in at politicians’ offices. They blocked streets and roadways. They emanded immediate and bold action. 

Also found in: [+]
Report Report: Diversity, Disclosure, CDP and the SDGs 2.1.2019 GreenBiz.com
The latest crop of research reports on sustainable business, climate and cleantech topics.
Also found in: [+]
A Carbon Price Can Benefit the Poor While Reducing Emissions 16.12.2018 WRI Stories
A Carbon Price Can Benefit the Poor While Reducing Emissions Comments|Add Comment|PrintWhen designed correctly, carbon prices can ensure that the low-carbon transition is also a just transition. Photo by Biswarup Ganguly/Wikimedia Commons The world is vastly underestimating the benefits of acting on climate change. Recent research from the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate finds that bold climate action could deliver at least $26 trillion in economic benefits through 2030. This... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Also found in: [+]
How the Blue Wave Swelled to a Tsunami in Orange County 30.11.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File Democratic Representative-elect Katie Porter speaks during an election night event on in Tustin, California.  Ever since California’s Orange County helped power the rise of Barry Goldwater and the Reagan Revolution, political observers have viewed it as the quintessential Republican stronghold.  Such congressional representatives as Dana Rohrabacher and Robert Dornan personified the belligerent far right, the Orange County Register promoted a hard-edged libertarian worldview, and Republican lawmakers such as Christopher Cox, Darrel Issa, and Ed Royce wielded considerable clout on Capitol Hill.      Named for orange groves long vanished, the suburban region south of Los Angeles was known for Disneyland, beautiful beaches, master planned communities, and a powerful conservative business class that exercised national political influence via the Lincoln Club, a high-rolling conservative fundraising group. Republican senators from across the nation made the pilgrimage to Orange ...
Also found in: [+]
Two years after Standing Rock protests, tensions remain but oil business booms 29.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Legal battles and local tensions persist two years after the North Dakota prairie was filled with thousands of indigenous and environmental protesters opposed to the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Also found in: [+]
Quebec's new government putting up barriers to cultural diversity and ignoring the environment 12.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Will Dubitsky Quebec's new provincial government, formed for the first time by the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) under the leadership of Premier François Legault, brings with it a new approach that proposes to shift the way the province manages immigration, deals with minority religious groups, represents Montreal and addresses climate change. These changes were outlined during the campaign. The shift that has received the most attention so far deals with religious symbols, a matter that Legault said he will handle himself. The new government aims to restrict all public employees in a position of authority -- judges, law enforcement officers, correctional employees and teachers -- from wearing religious symbols. The move is based, Legault has said, on the need to separate religion and the state. On October 3, new deputy premier Geneviève Guilbault announced that public officials would have a choice of removing their religious symbols or finding another job elsewhere in the public service. But the current ...
Also found in: [+]
Quebec’s new government putting up barriers to cultural diversity and ignoring the environment 12.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Will Dubitsky Quebec’s new provincial government, formed for the first time by the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) under the leadership of Premier François Legault, brings with it a new approach that proposes to shift the way the province manages immigration, deals with minority religious groups, represents Montreal and addresses climate change. These changes were outlined during the campaign. The shift that has received the most attention so far deals with religious symbols, a matter that Legault said he will handle himself. The new government aims to restrict all public employees in a position of authority – judges, law enforcement officers, correctional employees and teachers – from wearing religious symbols.  The move is based, Legault has said, on the need to separate religion and the state. On October 3, new deputy premier Geneviève Guilbault announced that public officials would have a choice of removing their religious symbols or finding another job elsewhere in the public service. But the current ...
Also found in: [+]
'Public charge' rule blamed for 'chilling effect' among immigrants 24.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
People are reportedly going without benefits that they or their children need for fear of hurting their immigration status.
Also found in: [+]
Onward toward gender equity in the era of climate change 21.9.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
It's critical that we make global women's empowerment a key piece of our resilience plans.
Also found in: [+]
It's up to Indigenous and environmental groups to protect the public interest 19.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Pamela Palmater Despite objections from some of the Indigenous groups about the consultation process, the Federal Court of Appeal (in Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. v. Canada (Attorney General) 2018 FCA 153) held that Canada acted in good faith and that the consultation framework it used was appropriate. This was a four-phase process which was to include (1) early engagement, (2) National Energy Board (NEB) hearing, (3) governor-in-council consideration and (4) regulatory authorization processes. Where Canada fell down was in Phase III of the consultation process in that it did not meaningfully consider the concerns of the Indigenous groups or attempt to accommodate or mitigate those concerns. There was no substantive discussion about Indigenous rights and the Federal Court of Appeal found that federal officials did little more than act as "note-takers." The court agreed with the Indigenous groups that Canada's notes, referred to as the Consultation Chronologies, "should be approached with caution" for ...
Also found in: [+]
Line 3 pipeline protesters block bridge near Bemidji 19.9.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Protesters conducted a water ceremony and blocked a bridge near Enbridge Energy's planned Line 3 replacement pipeline in northern Minnesota.
Also found in: [+]
Bemidji Line 3 pipeline protest indicates renewed opposition after regulatory approval 30.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
About 50 environmentalists marched down 3rd Street in downtown Bemidji Wednesday afternoon, linking arms across the intersection at Beltrami Avenue to stop traffic.
Also found in: [+]
“It Isn’t Just Flint.” How the Next Water Crisis Could Happen Anywhere. 9.7.2018 Mother Jones
You may think you know the story of what happened in Flint, Michigan. When Flint, under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, switched its water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint River in 2014, the people in the mostly lower-income, black city almost immediately began noticing problems—discoloration, unexplained rashes, and illnesses. It took […]
Also found in: [+]
Ontario fightback: Progressive MPPs headed to Queens Park speak out 28.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar On June 29 Ontarians will have a new premier who takes power with a Progressive Conservative majority government. However, Ontarians also elected some amazing progressive candidates, and at rabble.ca we intend to amplify what people are doing to stand for what Ontarians want and to continue to support progressive change. This is the first of a new Activist Toolkit series on Ontario's fightback against proposed cutbacks and attacks on the things you believe are important. Tell us about what you are doing by sending an email to maya[at]rabble.ca. To launch the series, we reached out to all the progressive MPPs who were elected and asked them three questions: why they ran, what they heard at doors, and what we can do to help them stand for Ontarians. After a hard-fought campaign, the slate of MPPs headed to Queens Park are busy and need time to recuperate. We are so grateful to (in no particular order) France Gélinas (Nickel Belt), Peter Tabuns (Toronto Danforth), Laura Mae Lindo  (Kitchener ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 2,966