User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: EJ Projects
Last updated: Feb 22 2018 21:57 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Global Uprising for a More Equitable and Humane Labor Force 22.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Despite the mass corporate media obsession with Donald Trump's reactionary, vulgar and insulting statements, grassroots activity is becoming more energized in the United States and around the globe. In We Are All Fast-Food Workers Now, Annelise Orleck records the movements for a more equitble and humane labor force, speaking with activists and giving grounds for hope. In a world of neoliberal dominance, advocating for fair and deserved worker justice is a challenging task. In this excerpt, Orleck makes the case that workers are rising up around the world to achieve this goal. A demonstrator holds a sign during a protest for higher wages and a union on April 15, 2015, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo: Mark Dixon ) Despite the mass corporate media obsession with Donald Trump's reactionary, vulgar and insulting statements, grassroots activity is becoming more energized in the United States and around the globe. History Professor Annelise Orleck records the movements for a more equitble and humane labor ...
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Who Was Marjory Stoneman Douglas? 20.2.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee Law enforcement officers block off the entrance to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida There’s nothing on the Parkland, Florida, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School website about the woman whose name adorns the school, so its students may not realize that in rising from last week’s tragedy to speak truth to power, they are following in Douglas’s activist footsteps. Douglas would certainly see a bit of herself in Emma Gonzalez, the poised and eloquent young woman whose speech electrified her classmates, teachers, parents, and the whole country at a Fort Lauderdale rally on Saturday, only days after a gunman entered her school and killed 17 people. “If the president wants to come up to me and tell me to my face that it was a terrible tragedy and how it should never have happened and maintain telling us how nothing is going to be done about it,” said the 18-year-old senior, “I'm going to happily ask him how much money he received from the National Rifle ...
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Activists sue Washington state for tougher climate policy 17.2.2018 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- Environmental activists are suing Washington state, the latest state-level effort to boost use of renewable energy....
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The Man Behind the Flint Water Prosecutions Wants to Be the Next Governor of Michigan 16.2.2018 Mother Jones
Two years ago, at the height of the Flint water crisis, residents of this impoverished, majority-black city were demanding accountability. Thousands of children had been exposed to dangerous levels of lead, and activists placed the blame squarely on the shoulders of Republican Gov. Rick Snyder and his administration. There were calls for Snyder’s resignation, for […]
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What White People Can Do for Food Justice 29.1.2018 Truthout.com
People of color have been working for food justice for decades. They need resources. Chef Nadine Nelson, creator of Master Cooks Corps train-the-trainer program, says white people in the food movement should ask: What are you doing to hold yourself accountable to people of color? Best-selling author Mark Bittman prepares lunch in Washington, DC, on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Photo: Nikki Kahn / The Washington Post via Getty Images)   Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! It is possible that the rich and famous can offer more to society than glimpses into their opulent lifestyles. The cult of celebrity today goes beyond our desire and admiration of superstars' expensive clothes, cars, and houses. We want to know where they stand on important issues that impact our lives, like racism, sexual violence, the environment, food and land reform. To our consolation, some of them are actually using their platforms to stand ...
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Women’s rights issues are climate change issues 23.1.2018 Washington Post
Women’s rights issues are climate change issues
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Newly Released Documents Show Dakota Access Pipeline Is Discriminatory Against Native Americans 22.1.2018 Truthout.com
Records obtained recently show that the companies funding the Dakota Access pipeline manipulated their environmental justice assessment of its impact after the pipeline was rerouted from a predominantly white area onto Sioux Tribal land. What's more, it appears that this was done under the active guidance of the US Army Corps of Engineers. A young activist holds a sign during a march in solidarity with Standing Rock Water Protectors in Seattle, Washington, on September 16, 2016. (Photo: John Duffy ) Truthout readers like you made this story possible. Show your support for independent news: Make a tax-deductible donation today! A new year and  five oil-spills  later, the flowing of oil through the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) underneath the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's water supply continues to be a threat to tribal survival. As the Tribe battles to shut down the oil flow through the courts, new information detailing how the pipeline was wrongly placed through Lake Oahe -- the Tribe's main source of ...
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A long simmering factor in Iran protests: climate change 18.1.2018 L.A. Times - World News

In the mountains of western Iran, the province of Chaharmahal Bakhtiari is known for mile-high lagoons, flowing rivers and wetlands that attract thousands of species of migratory birds.

But years of diminishing rainfall have shriveled water sources. Conditions worsened, residents say, after Iranian...

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The New Resistance in Iran: An Interview With Frieda Afary 11.1.2018 Truthout.com
Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! Iranian workers and the poor, mostly teens and unemployed young adults, have staged a wave of protests that is shaking the country, particularly the religious and political elite. These are not the first protests against the Islamic Republic. In 2009, democracy activists built the Green Movement in opposition to then-President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's rigging of elections that returned the hard-liner to power. More recently, anger at growing class inequality has been the driving motive for strikes and actions over the last two years -- against a new president, Hassan Rouhani, who is associated with reform forces. In many ways, these economic protests have culminated in the current dramatic protest movement that swept through Iran over the last couple of weeks. Frieda Afary is an Iranian-American librarian and translator, producer of ...
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Hopes for 2018 by Movement Leaders Around the Globe 9.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
"The innovation and vision of Black people is critical, along with the activation of millions who understand that our futures are tied to one another." —Alicia Garza. (Photo: KK Ottesen) With your support, Truthout can continue exposing inequality, analyzing policy and reporting on the struggle for a better world. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. Across the globe, 2017 brought us to new lows. Yet, even as crisis after crisis shook us to the ground, they also inspired many to rise up and take to the streets and other venues of popular power. Donald Trump as president awakened millions, sparked new cross-sectoral coalitions, and galvanized people to creative and effective action. Across the world, those who never had the luxury of complacency continued their struggles for participatory democracy; economic justice; an end to wars and violence; protection of the global commons; the rights and security of women, LGBTQ folk, and other excluded populations; and an end to theft and plunder of ...
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Capturing the Causes and Impacts of Climate Change: 2017 in Photos 31.12.2017 Truthout.com
This year brought more super-sized storms due to global warming and more people taking to the streets in response to the political climate. This photo essay documents a range of issues related to climate change, from extreme weather enhanced by it to the expanding industrial landscape contributing to it. A dance troop marches by Shell's Norco refinery during Norco, Louisiana's Christmas Parade. (All images © Julie Dermansky) Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! The year 2017 was, in many ways, stormy. It brought more storms super-sized due to global warming and more people, including scientists, taking to the streets in response to the political climate. This year for DeSmog I continued documenting a range of issues related to climate change, from extreme weather enhanced by it to the expanding industrial landscape contributing to it.  This year I shot the  aftermath of Hurricane Harvey , a storm researchers ...
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Access to clean water a luxury for some First Nations reserves 30.12.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Krystalline Kraus I recently went to a movie and one of the pre-screening ads was about donating to a global charity that helps people get access to clean water. As I watched the ad, I wondered how many people in that packed theatre knew that it is not only communities in developing nations that struggle for access to clean water. The very same issues are true for some reserves. "Two-thirds of all First Nation communities in Canada have been under at least one drinking water advisory at some time in the last decade," according to a CBC News investigation , and it has not gotten much better in 2017. "The longest-running water advisory is in the Neskantaga First Nation in Ontario, where residents have been boiling their water for 20 years," says the CBC report. In second, third and fourth place are the Nazko First Nation, Alexis Creek First Nation and Lake Babine First Nation, all of which are in British Columbia and have struggled with water issues over the past 16 years. Not that your average Canadian ...
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In Case You Missed Them, Here Are Some Cool Environmental Stories from 2017 30.12.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by The Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. It was a tempestuous year—politically and literally. Donald Trump’s June announcement of an exit from the Paris climate accord confirmed the fears around the world of scientists and politicians about the US’s repositioning on climate change. From Scott Pruitt’s Environmental Protection Agency, […]
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A farmers activist is beaten to death, and the video goes viral. How tensions over land are tearing at Myanmar 29.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary
Myanmar's transition from military rule has reopened grievances over army land seizures that are pitting farmers against the government, influential business interests, foreign investors - and one another.
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A Philippines grandmother fought to get a toxic coal stockpile out of her neighborhood. Three bullets stopped her. 28.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary
Gloria Capitan was shot to death last summer after campaigning against a coal stockpile. That was only the beginning
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'If we're attacked, we'll die together,' a teenage anti-mining activist told her family. But when the bullets came, they killed only her 27.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary
Topacio Reynoso had devoted herself to opposing construction of a large silver mine planned near her hometown. "Nature is a paradise where we sow dreams and reap happiness," she wrote. Now that she's dead, her father wonders whether it's worth carrying on the fight.
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EPA says herbicide in Roundup weed killer doesn't cause cancer, contradicting California regulators 19.12.2017 LA Times: Business

The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Monday said glyphosate, the primary ingredient in the weed killer Roundup and one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture, likely does not cause cancer.

The assessment contradicts the conclusion of a European scientific panel as well as California...

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Feature and TV films 16.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary
Movies on TV the week of Dec. 17 - 23, 2017
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The Energy 202: Legal battle over national monuments is just beginning 6.12.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Environmentalists are gearing up for a big fight.
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Build and Fight: The Program and Strategy of Cooperation Jackson 5.12.2017 Truthout.com
An excerpt from the recently published book   Jackson Rising: The Struggle for Economic Democracy and Self-Determination in Jackson, Mississippi , a chronicle of one of the most dynamic but under-documented experiments in radical social transformation taking place in the United States. The book documents the ongoing organizing and institution-building of the political forces concentrated in Jackson, Mississippi, dedicated to advancing the "Jackson-Kush Plan." These forces include the Jackson People's Assembly, the New Afrikan People's Organization, the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, the Jackson Human Rights Institute and Cooperation Jackson.  (Image: Daraja Press)The following is an excerpt from the recently published book   Jackson Rising: The Struggle for Economic Democracy and Self-Determination in Jackson, Mississippi .  Jackson Rising is a chronicle of one of the most dynamic but under-documented experiments in radical social transformation taking place in the United States. The book documents the ...
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