User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Campus
Last updated: Oct 12 2018 18:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Could a toxic site be on your Philly block? New research reveals hidden hazards. 12.10.2018 Philly.com News
New research shows unregulated hazardous industrial sites are as thick as three per square block across Philadelphia, concentrated in many gentrifying neighborhoods.
Can a Blue Wave in a Blue State Make Ben Jealous Maryland’s First African American Governor? 12.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Thirty-six governor’s mansions are up for grabs this November, and Ben Jealous, the 45-year-old former president of the NAACP turned venture capitalist, is on a mission to reclaim Maryland’s for the Democrats. In theory, this shouldn’t be such a heavy lift. Registered Democrats outnumber Republicans 2 to 1 in the state, and Hillary Clinton swept it in 2016 by 26 points. The election carries some symbolic weight as well: If Jealous won, he would become the first African American governor of this former slave state where Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman once toiled. Like his fellow black gubernatorial nominees, Stacey Abrams in Georgia and Andrew Gillum in Florida, Jealous could make some history this November. But the media and most political observers remain skeptical of Jealous’s prospects. His opponent, Republican Larry Hogan, who previously worked as a real-estate developer, has governed as a ...
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UArts attracts $79 million for a maker space, rehearsal halls, a recording studio … and there's a big dorm coming, too 12.10.2018 Philly.com News
A $25 million bequest from the late Campbell Soup heiress "Dodo" Hamilton kicked off the school's first-ever comprehensive campaign. "Drastic" change is afoot.
The Return of American Socialism 11.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  In 1960, the young socialist Michael Harrington traveled to Ann Arbor to provide what help he could to the fledgling radical movement at the University of Michigan, and to see if he could recruit some students to the Young People’s Socialist League. He had particularly long talks with the 20-year-old editor of The Michigan Daily (the student newspaper), Tom Hayden. Though the two hit it off, Harrington couldn’t make the sale. “He accepted much of my analysis,” Harrington later was to write, “yet he balked at the socialist idea itself.” Harrington was no slouch at converting progressives to socialism; an unusually high percentage of the members of the Democratic Socialist Organizing Committee (which he founded in 1973) and its successor organization, the Democratic Socialists of America (which he co-founded in 1982) signed up after having been intellectually and emotionally persuaded by one or more Harrington ...
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Smart money practices to save for college 10.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Higher ed is getting more and more expensive. Are you ready to send your child off to college?
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Jim Kenney 1,000 days in: The fine print of the Philly mayor's promises 10.10.2018 Philly.com News
End stop-and-frisk. Implement universal pre-K. Send tens of millions of dollars more to Philadelphia's schools. Create family-sustaining jobs. On his 1,000th day in office, Mayor Jim Kenney released a progress report. We ran a fine-tooth comb through it to determine what he's really gotten done.
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'Beyond beautiful': Native Americans celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day 9.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A reclaiming of a holiday once dedicated to Christopher Columbus, some recalled how as children, their parents offered a narrative of Columbus that was far different from what they learned in school.
Climate change on trial: MN jury to weigh if it's OK to break laws 8.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Today, three activists who briefly shut down two oil pipelines in Leonard, Minn., two years ago will argue their civil disobedience was justified because climate change is an imminent danger. It could be a bellwether case.
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Taking Back North Carolina 8.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  By Labor Day, the traditional start of campaign season, Marcus Bass had already logged thousands of miles crisscrossing the state working on turnout in the 2018 election. Bass is Deputy Director of the North Carolina Black Alliance, and like thousands of his fellow organizers and activists, he’s driven this year by the sense that there’s a lot more on the line in the ninth-largest state than voters may realize.  It’s frustrating, he says, that deeply purple North Carolina is too often cast as another Deep South story. The lurch right by the legislature over the past decade cloaks a long history of social justice organizing that has given progressives the means to push back against the right’s agenda. “We’re not an Alabama,” he says. “North Carolina has consistently given the national audience an understanding of what the threats are and what the fight back is.”  This is the year Democrats, led by Governor Roy ...
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Kavanaugh fight revealed how badly U.S. democracy is broken. Here's how to fix it | Will Bunch 7.10.2018 Philly.com News
Can America still be called a democracy when a morally compromised judge opposed by a plurality of citizens can get nominated by a president who got fewer votes and confirmed by senators representing a minority of Americans?
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Supreme Court moves right -- but how far, how fast? 7.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
With Brett Kavanaugh taking the place of the more moderate Anthony Kennedy, conservatives should have a working majority of five justices. Yet Kavanaugh may have a hard time putting behind him the tumultuous confirmation process.
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The Collins Conundrum 4.10.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) Senator Susan Collins on Capitol Hill on October 3, 2018 Shortly after Brett Kavanaugh unleashed his apoplectic plea for a Supreme Court seat, a small group of women, some dressed in judges’ robes, arrived to protest in front of Senator Susan Collins’s house in Bangor, Maine. Had she been at home, she would have seen the women carrying signs urging her to vote no when Kavanaugh’s confirmation comes up for a vote in the Senate. Contrast that episode with Mainers’ reaction to seeing Collins at Bangor International Airport last summer. Deplaning from a Washington flight, Collins walked through the arrivals area into a round of applause from the assembled travelers after she’d help defeat her Senate colleagues’ attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. After more than 20 years in the Senate, she savored the once-in-a-career moment. Today, Collins is once again a pivotal vote on the nation’s future—and her own. After President Trump’s latest diatribe against the college professor who ...
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Bynum brothers take a tip from jazz: Improvisation is the key 4.10.2018 Philly.com News
The brothers, on the scene since the 1990 opening of Zanzibar Blue, just opened Green Soul, whose menu features dishes inspired by soul food - but healthful.
Nelson Díaz on a lifetime of being 'the first Latino' 4.10.2018 Philly.com News
Pennsylvania's first Latino judge talks about his new autobiography, "Not from Here or From There/No Soy de Aquí ni de Allá," which he's bringing to the Free Library on Oct. 9.
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The Good News from the Voting Wars 3.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect. Subscribe here .  The 2018 midterm election is often depicted as a contest between crude voter suppression by Republican state governments and a national blue-wave mobilization of grassroots Democrats. But the story is actually more complicated and even more hopeful. In addition to the party organizing this year, a two-decade nonpartisan movement to expand access to the ballot is also bearing fruit across the country. The result could be a dramatic expansion of voting participation that swamps suppression efforts, enhances voter-mobilization efforts, and shatters the usual low expectations of off-year voting turnout. The attempt at voter suppression, of course, is real. It is a dark part of the playbook that some—though by no means all—states under Republican control have promoted to retain their power. After the Tea Party wave of 2010, the most recent chapter in longstanding efforts to restrict the vote moved forward in earnest. ...
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How Chipotle, MGM and Microsoft are trimming food waste 1.10.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
And which technologies could be essential ingredients in your company's own reduction recipe.
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Why sustainable businesses should consider plant-based workplaces 29.9.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Tracking environmental impacts often doesn't include food consumption. Here's why it must.
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Why sustainable businesses should be thinking about plant-based workplaces 29.9.2018 GreenBiz.com
Tracking environmental impacts often doesn't include food consumption. Here's why it must.
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Colleges Favor Academics Over Activism 28.9.2018 Wall St. Journal: Opinion
A new study reveals good priorities rather than political bias.
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Hopkins High School students stage sit-in for sexual violence victims 28.9.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The sit-in took place at the same time that Christine Blasey Ford was testifying in Washington about her allegations that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were both teenagers.
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