User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Campus
Last updated: Dec 12 2018 03:33 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Iowa college becomes battleground for student worker unionization 12.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Students with campus jobs at Grinnell College want to unionize, but the college is pushing back and asking the National Labor Relations Board to reconsider an Obama-era ruling allowing such unions.
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Searching for answers to more sustainable concrete — in space 10.12.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Sponsored: BASF collaborates with NASA and Penn State on mixing sustainable concrete in zero gravity.
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Decline of reading causes decline in thinking, which impairs social and political participation 8.12.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn The number of newspaper readers is plunging by the millions in most countries, including Canada and the United States. This decline is driven by the hundreds of metro dailies that have been forced to close, merge or drastically reduce their size or frequency. In Canada, even the big-city papers that still survive, including the Toronto Star, the Globe and Mail, the Vancouver Sun and the Montreal Gazette, have had their paid circulations -- and thus their editorial staffs -- sharply reduced, some nearly by half.  This massive loss of readers and revenue has led in Canada to the concentration of media ownership (including TV and radio networks) in the hands of a few large conglomerates. This kind of monopoly leads to a much lower standard of news coverage. As Dale Eisler at the Johnson Shoyama School School of Public Policy puts it, “They are not terribly interested in news quality because that is not their priority. Newspapers they deem not profitable, or not profitable enough, are simply ...
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We need a federal climate policy, but please ditch the name ‘Green New Deal’ 7.12.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The namesake U.S. stimulus package enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt helped institutionalize racial segregation.
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How an exiled activist in Minnesota helped spur big political changes in Ethiopia 7.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Ethiopia's recent changes are due largely to an uprising by young men from the largest ethnic group, the Oromo. Their inspiration: Jawar Mohammed, who created a media network in exile in Minnesota.
Why Presidio Graduate School integrated the SDGs into its curriculum 5.12.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
End goal: For every MBA program to include global sustainability and multisector thinking within its core.
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Why Presidio integrated the SDGs into its curriculum 5.12.2018 GreenBiz.com
End goal: For every MBA program to include global sustainability and multisector thinking within its core.
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Elie Wiesel was a teacher above all else, says book author 4.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Most of the world knows Elie Wiesel as a Holocaust survivor, a human rights activist, a confidant of presidents and prime ministers, and a Nobel Peace Prize winner. But Wiesel always saw himself as a teacher, says Wiesel's former teaching assistant who penned a new book based on those teachings.
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How the Blue Wave Swelled to a Tsunami in Orange County 30.11.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File Democratic Representative-elect Katie Porter speaks during an election night event on in Tustin, California.  Ever since California’s Orange County helped power the rise of Barry Goldwater and the Reagan Revolution, political observers have viewed it as the quintessential Republican stronghold.  Such congressional representatives as Dana Rohrabacher and Robert Dornan personified the belligerent far right, the Orange County Register promoted a hard-edged libertarian worldview, and Republican lawmakers such as Christopher Cox, Darrel Issa, and Ed Royce wielded considerable clout on Capitol Hill.      Named for orange groves long vanished, the suburban region south of Los Angeles was known for Disneyland, beautiful beaches, master planned communities, and a powerful conservative business class that exercised national political influence via the Lincoln Club, a high-rolling conservative fundraising group. Republican senators from across the nation made the pilgrimage to Orange ...
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A sharing economy for plants: Seed libraries are sprouting up 22.11.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Agribusinesses vs. community agriculture — an American tradition?
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Giving thanks for bipartisanship 22.11.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Here's something to be thankful for: climate action on the political horizon.
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Walmartism and Its Discontents 19.11.2018 American Prospect
Nick Ut/AP Images Efforts to unionize Walmart have made little headway in the face of a problem endemic to the retail sector: high turnover. Discontented workers simpyl quit rather than invest in the hard work of fixing a company's problems.  Working for Respect: Community and Conflict at Walmart By Adam Reich and Peter Bearman Columbia University Press This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Until the “gig economy” and artificial intelligence became their primary preoccupations, observers of the 21st-century workplace were obsessed with the 800-pound gorilla of global retail: Walmart. Infamous for its low wages—so low that many of its workers are eligible for public assistance—and for its intransigent resistance to unionization, this global corporate behemoth was also the target of multiple gender discrimination lawsuits over the years. Although many of its practices are similar to those of other large retailers, Walmart became the poster child ...
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College football: Northwestern capitalizes on turnovers to beat Minnesota 18.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Isaiah Bowser rushed for 85 yards and two touchdowns, and No. 24 Northwestern turned three turnovers by Minnesota quarterback Tanner Morgan into 10 points on the way to a 24-14 victory on Saturday.
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In the business of wasting nothing 16.11.2018 GreenBiz.com
Matthew Hollis, founder and CEO of waste management software firm Elytus, talks about the cultural side of trash.
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U.K. reaches draft Brexit deal with E.U. — but it may be a tough sell 14.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
The British prime minister's office confirmed the deal Tuesday without offering further details. But that did not silence Theresa May's critics at home, many of whom have already expressed opposition.
In the #MeToo era, should Minnesota schools be teaching consent? 13.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Advocates say they're not giving up their push for schools to teach the principles of consent — the earlier, the better.
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Q&A: Vietnam and the Road to Disaster 13.11.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo Marines unloading and moving through a tree and branch strewn landing zone in South Vietnam on December 17, 1969.  roadtodisaster_cover.jpg Equipped fresh insights from the fields of cognitive science and psychology, Brian VanDeMark’s Road to Disaster: A New History of America’s Descent Into Vietnam examines how Lyndon Johnson and his Vietnam advisors, “best and the brightest,” as David Halberstam’s famously called them in seminal  work,  unspooled the decisions that cost the lives of more than 58,000 Americans. VanDeMark, an associate professor of history at the U.S. Naval Academy, has taught courses on the Vietnam War for nearly 30 years. As a young historian, he assisted Robert McNamara, Lyndon Johnson’s Secretary of Defense, with his controversial 1995  memoir  on the war and got to know other senior advisors like Clark Clifford, McNamara’s successor.  After Vietnam, Americans embraced a less jaundiced view of veterans and military service, but VanDeMark also tells The American Prospect that ...
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The Nine New Democratic Black Congress Members Come From Heavily White Districts 12.11.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Teresa Crawford Democratic Representative-elect Lauren Underwood, who defeated of four-term Republican incumbent Randy Hultgren on November 6, campaigning in Lindenhurst, Illinois.  The blue wave had some black riders. Every African American Democrat in the House running for re-election in this year’s midterms won his or her race.  In addition, voters sent nine new black members, all Democrats, to Congress. As a result, the number of black House members will grow to an  all-time peak  of 56, even if, as appears possible, both black Republicans(Utah’s Mia Love and Texas’ Will Hurt) lose their seats.   What’s unusual about the nine new members is that all of them prevailed in predominantly white and mostly suburban districts. Five of the nine are women.  For most of the 20th century, there were few black members of Congress. In 1950, only two African Americans (William Dawson of Chicago’s South Side and Adam Clayton Powell of Harlem) served in the House. The civil rights movement and the 1965 ...
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A life full of winter: U astrophysicist cares for telescope in Antarctica 12.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A scientist working for the University of Minnesota has spent more time than anyone else at South Pole station, a decade and a half of nights. Next year will be his final planned year, as the telescope he maintains will be retired.
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College football: Minnesota defense shows in 41-10 win against Purdue 11.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Minnesota's maligned defense held Purdue to season-lows in yards and points, and Seth Green had a touchdown rushing and passing for the Gophers in a 41-10 win against the Boilermakers in the cold and snow on Saturday.
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