User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Environmental Justice :: Diversity
Last updated: Apr 13 2019 24:17 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump administration rubber stamps Arizona copper mine 12.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
An industry-friendly ruling contradicts years of concerns over potential damage to endangered species, water systems and Native American cultural sites.
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What We Know About Fossil Fuels 30 Years After The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill 24.3.2019 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The largely invisible impacts of long-term fossil fuel extraction were beginning to surface.
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Liberal budget leaves behind Indigenous women and children 21.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Liberal budget leaves behind Indigenous women and children
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EPA Administrator Dismisses Climate Change As '50 To 75 Years Out' 20.3.2019 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Andrew Wheeler, a former coal industry lobbyist, has regularly downplayed the threat of climate change.
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Student organizers report back on March 15 climate strike 20.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar Many of us supported and were heartened by students coming out on March 15 to demand that local and federal government take real steps to combat climate change. There were many great interviews and news stories which talked to kids out on the street . The Activist Toolkit, however, decided to take a different approach. I contacted all the local organizers I could find and asked them: 1. How did your local climate strike go? 2. What worked and what did not? 3. What will you be doing for the national day of action in Canada on May 3? 4. What did some of the students that participated say? 5. What are you trying to win in your communities? I am posting edited versions of the responses I received below. If you would like to connect about your experience organizing the strike in your community, please send it my way. The Activist Toolkit will continue stay in touch with organizers and continue to help support the demand for real action on climate change. The reports below are the personal ...
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Mining companies pollute waterways. Citizens pay. 19.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Nearly 2 billion pounds of toxic waste were dumped into western waterways in 2017, and taxpayers are left to clean up the mess.
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Sustainability professionals must shine brighter than their peers: Here's how to do it 18.3.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
5 ways for rising above stereotypes and cognitive biases about environmental, social and governance strategists.
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The evolution of women's marches into broad social movements 12.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Judy Rebick Despite the cold of Toronto's first snowy day of the winter, I, along with about 2,000 others, took to the streets on January 19 for the Women's March on: Toronto -- one of hundreds of similar marches across the U.S. and Canada. It was the most spirited march I've been on in years, in part because of the cold, in part because of a great group of passionate speakers, and in part, I hope, because people are getting the idea that radical women are the best way out of this mess. The first Women's March on Washington in 2016 was held to protest the inauguration of Donald Trump as U.S. president. The success of women's marches led to a significant number of young, kick-ass women of colour being elected to the U.S. Congress this fall. One of the newly elected, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, spoke at the New York Women's March this year. Justice is not just about identity, she said, "It's about the water we drink, the air we breathe, how much ladies are being paid, whether we can stay with our children ...
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New Mexico lawmakers focus on equity in the outdoors 4.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A new fund would help low-income youth play in their public lands.
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Environmental victories don’t guarantee economic justice 14.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Without a just transition, the Navajo Generating Station closure will have harmful consequences.
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On-the-ground pollution data spurred stricter zoning in Los Angeles 31.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Locals’ efforts prompted buffers for auto shops and air filter rules for new buildings.
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What killed Washington’s carbon tax? 21.1.2019 Current Issue
The curious death of 1631 and what it says about the future of addressing climate change.
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A toxic past and present on the Spokane River 9.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In eastern Washington, a push to clean PCBs from its namesake river faces a dirty legacy and global pollution problem.
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Quebec's new government putting up barriers to cultural diversity and ignoring the environment 12.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Will Dubitsky Quebec's new provincial government, formed for the first time by the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) under the leadership of Premier François Legault, brings with it a new approach that proposes to shift the way the province manages immigration, deals with minority religious groups, represents Montreal and addresses climate change. These changes were outlined during the campaign. The shift that has received the most attention so far deals with religious symbols, a matter that Legault said he will handle himself. The new government aims to restrict all public employees in a position of authority -- judges, law enforcement officers, correctional employees and teachers -- from wearing religious symbols. The move is based, Legault has said, on the need to separate religion and the state. On October 3, new deputy premier Geneviève Guilbault announced that public officials would have a choice of removing their religious symbols or finding another job elsewhere in the public service. But the current ...
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Quebec’s new government putting up barriers to cultural diversity and ignoring the environment 12.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Will Dubitsky Quebec’s new provincial government, formed for the first time by the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) under the leadership of Premier François Legault, brings with it a new approach that proposes to shift the way the province manages immigration, deals with minority religious groups, represents Montreal and addresses climate change. These changes were outlined during the campaign. The shift that has received the most attention so far deals with religious symbols, a matter that Legault said he will handle himself. The new government aims to restrict all public employees in a position of authority – judges, law enforcement officers, correctional employees and teachers – from wearing religious symbols.  The move is based, Legault has said, on the need to separate religion and the state. On October 3, new deputy premier Geneviève Guilbault announced that public officials would have a choice of removing their religious symbols or finding another job elsewhere in the public service. But the current ...
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3 challenges — and opportunities — for businesses to help save tropical forests 10.10.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Research shows climate finance is reaching most jurisdictions, but slowly.
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The business of clean energy equity for all 9.10.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Here are three ways to advance a inclusive, green economy.
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Report Report: Disclosure, climate action, water and inclusive growth 25.9.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
A monthly wrap-up of recent research on sustainable business and clean technology reports you need to know.
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It's up to Indigenous and environmental groups to protect the public interest 19.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Pamela Palmater Despite objections from some of the Indigenous groups about the consultation process, the Federal Court of Appeal (in Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. v. Canada (Attorney General) 2018 FCA 153) held that Canada acted in good faith and that the consultation framework it used was appropriate. This was a four-phase process which was to include (1) early engagement, (2) National Energy Board (NEB) hearing, (3) governor-in-council consideration and (4) regulatory authorization processes. Where Canada fell down was in Phase III of the consultation process in that it did not meaningfully consider the concerns of the Indigenous groups or attempt to accommodate or mitigate those concerns. There was no substantive discussion about Indigenous rights and the Federal Court of Appeal found that federal officials did little more than act as "note-takers." The court agreed with the Indigenous groups that Canada's notes, referred to as the Consultation Chronologies, "should be approached with caution" for ...
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Report Report: Corporate conservation, youth and disrupting luxury 21.8.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
A monthly wrap-up of recent research on sustainable business and clean technology reports you need to know.
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