On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Environmental Justice :: Diversity
Last updated: Nov 13 2018 10:58 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Elections in the West highlight divisions and diversity 19.11.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Justice, power and environment: The 2020 elections were defined by grassroots organizing and deep partisanship.
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4 ways businesses can connect with their communities to create a clean economy 6.11.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
4 ways businesses can connect with their communities to create a clean economy Marian Jones Fri, 11/06/2020 - 01:00 Companies often struggle with building community trust as they navigate between profit-making and authentically engaging on climate change and environmental justice matters. Last week at GreenBiz Group’s virtual conference and expo on stimulating the clean economy, VERGE 20 , community leaders and businesses from across the country came together to network, share insights and explore solutions to these challenges. During the panel "Connecting Communities to the Clean Economy," experts shared their experiences working with private companies, their fights for green jobs and why businesses need to think of themselves as part of the community. The talk featured two women of color and leaders within the environmental and economic justice movement: Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of UPROSE (founded as the United Puerto Rican Organization of Sunset Park); and Rahwa Ghirmatzion, executive ...
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In Arizona, building a wall — and destroying a canyon 30.10.2020 High Country News Most Recent
In a mountain range too steep to cross, DHS is spending millions of dollars on five miles of border wall.
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How conservation groups confront distrust from communities of color 29.10.2020 High Country News Most Recent
In order to attract a broader constituency, organizations must first address a history of missteps and exclusion.
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These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health 26.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health Oliver Camp Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:30 On the recent World Food Day, the clarion call was clearer than ever: We must fix our food systems to improve human health, drive economic growth and save the planet from environmental collapse. The challenges facing us are wide-ranging. The way the world produces and consumes food causes huge environmental impacts, and yet 3 billion people worldwide are unable to afford a healthy diet, and up to a third of the food we produce is wasted. What’s more, hunger and micronutrient deficiencies are concentrated among the poorest and most vulnerable — often including those who produce the food we eat. Meanwhile, the so-called double burden of malnutrition is on the rise: hunger and malnourishment coexisting with overweight and obesity, often in the same countries, communities or even individuals. Tackling these multiple challenges and threats requires coordinated action from the public sector, private ...
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Inside Beautycounter’s quest to transform its mica supply chain 5.10.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Inside Beautycounter’s quest to transform its mica supply chain Joel Makower Mon, 10/05/2020 - 02:11 First in a two-part series. This story begins, as so many supply-chain stories do, at a mine, the beginning of a journey in which a commodity — mica, in this case — finds its way into an extraordinarily diverse array of quotidian things: attic insulation; brake linings; car paint; concrete; electronic capacitors; epoxies; fertilizers; gypsum wallboard; LED lights; molded rubber; oil and gas drilling fluids; plastics; printing inks; roofing shingles; and toothpaste. And somewhere down that list: cosmetics. The mine in question — actually, thousands of them — can be found in the eastern Indian province of Jharkhand, just over 200 miles west of the cultural hub of Kolkata. Jharkhand — and Bihar, its neighbor to the north — boast one of the world’s richest veins of mica as well as a complex ecosystem of players large and small that provide the shiny, shimmering rock to global markets, including to a maverick ...
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Energy dominance or climate action: Trump, Biden and the fate of public lands 1.10.2020 High Country News Most Recent
In Grand Junction, Colorado, the presidential election is a choice between two distinct energy futures.
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How anti-Indigeneity proliferates around the West and the world 25.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Across the globe, anti-Indigenous organizations and sympathizers work to undermine the collective rights of Indigenous peoples.
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A little paper with clout 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
How High Country News evolved.
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‘Somebody has to keep people on their toes’ 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
High Country News’ unlikely and remarkable origin story.
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Extreme heat is here, and it’s deadly 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Gearing up for the fight against a new climate enemy.
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Yellowstone grizzlies keep endangered species protections 10.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
A court ruling disallows sport hunting the bears in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.
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How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice 6.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice Kristoffer Tigue Mon, 07/06/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in InsideClimate News and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. In many ways, Maleta Kimmons defines her neighborhood by what it lacks. Several houses near her home remain vacant. Last week, she had to drive seven miles just to buy groceries. And two weeks ago, at the height of the Minneapolis protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd by a police officer May 25, looters broke into the only pharmacy in the area, forcing the store to close and leaving many in the neighborhood without easy access to life-saving medication such as insulin or inhalers for asthma. Kimmons, who prefers to go by the name Queen, said what her neighborhood doesn't lack is pollution. Near North, where Queen lives, is one of several neighborhoods that make up north Minneapolis, a  predominately ...
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Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
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Navajo ranchers are raising premium beef. 17.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Is their success sustainable?
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How a small Arizona town is building ecological resilience 26.5.2020 Current Issue
A younger generation of activists are being trained in conservation.
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Episode 217: Checking in with CSOs, biodiversity talk, the 'fragility' of auto-centric cities 24.4.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Plus, McKinsey Partner Dickon Pinner offers advice on how corporate sustainability professions can apply lessons from the COVID-19 crisis to long-term climate strategy.
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Triumph and tragedy: Trump’s border wall expands 20.4.2020 Current Issue
Anger and despair rise as new projects are announced in the Southwest.
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Hip hop can bring green issues to communities of color 13.4.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
The environmental movement largely has failed to connect with people of color and marginalized urban communities. By confronting issues from contaminated water to climate change, hip hop music can help bridge that divide and bring home the realities of environmental injustice.
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Dyper and TerraCycle make composting diapers accessible 10.4.2020 GreenBiz.com
Leaders from the two companies hope others will be inspired to do more to reuse or compost their products.
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