User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Sep 01 2020 21:24 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 2,961    
Extreme heat is here, and it’s deadly 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Gearing up for the fight against a new climate enemy.
Also found in: [+]
Tribal nations are decolonizing cultural protection 27.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
A new book looks at a ‘third way’ for Indian law.
Also found in: [+]
Across California, local governments are abolishing court fees 12.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Legal fees tend to fall disproportionately on low-income people.
Also found in: [+]
New local campaigns can bring cheaper and cleaner rooftop solar to communities of color 6.8.2020 GreenBiz.com
New local campaigns can bring cheaper and cleaner rooftop solar to communities of color Lacey Shaver Thu, 08/06/2020 - 00:20 There is a new urgency across the United States to address structural and systemic racial inequities in criminal justice , wealth and housing , employment , health care and education . These disparities are also pervasive in energy. One common measure of this is "energy burden," or the share of take-home income spent on energy bills. Communities of color have been shown to have a 24–27 percent higher energy burden than White Americans when controlling across income levels, and low-income residents experience an energy burden up to three times higher than high-income residents. Rooftop solar has the potential to reduce energy burden in communities of color, but it has not yet lived up to its potential due to systemic barriers: lack of solar education and outreach; financial challenges such as lower income and access to credit; and issues related to home ownership, such as lower ...
Also found in: [+]
The digital divide worsens the inequitable impacts of the climate crisis 3.8.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
The digital divide worsens the inequitable impacts of the climate crisis Maddie Stone Mon, 08/03/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in Grist and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. One of the starkest inequalities exposed by the coronavirus pandemic is the difference between the digital haves and have-nots. Those with a fast internet connection are more able to work and learn remotely, stay in touch with loved ones and access critical services such as telemedicine. For the millions of Americans who live in an internet dead zone , fully participating in society in the age of social distancing has become difficult, if not impossible. But if the pandemic has laid bare America’s so-called "digital divide," climate change will only worsen the inequality that stems from it. As the weather grows more extreme and unpredictable, wealthy urban communities with faster, more reliable internet access will have ...
Also found in: [+]
The Estée Lauder Companies' sustainability leader on racial justice, 'sector-agnostic' solutions 27.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
The Estée Lauder Companies' sustainability leader on racial justice, 'sector-agnostic' solutions Heather Clancy Mon, 07/27/2020 - 01:30 In the four years since Nancy Mahon assumed responsibility for CSR and sustainability strategy at The Estée Lauder Companies — she's currently senior vice president of corporate citizenship and sustainability — her team has launched a series of new initiatives that are a "first" among her organization's sector. The list includes the company's first virtual power purchase agreement for 22 megawatts, a move made in pursuit of its 2020 net-zero carbon emission goal. More recently, it energized on-site two solar arrays — one at its Melville, New York, campus that will produce 1,800 megawatt-hours of power annually, and a smaller one at the Aveda brand's campus in Minnesota. The New York installation will provide 100 percent of the electricity required for its Joseph H. Lauder office facility, while the Minnesota one will contribute up to 50 percent — the remainder of its ...
Also found in: [+]
Estée Lauder's sustainability leader on racial justice, 'sector-agnostic' solutions 27.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Estée Lauder's sustainability leader on racial justice, 'sector-agnostic' solutions Heather Clancy Mon, 07/27/2020 - 01:30 In the six years since Nancy Mahon assumed responsibility for CSR and sustainability strategy at Estée Lauder Companies — she's currently senior vice president of corporate citizenship and sustainability — her team has launched a series of new initiatives that are a "first" among her organization's sector. The list includes the company's first virtual power purchase agreement for 22 megawatts, a move made in pursuit of its 2020 net-zero carbon emission goal. More recently, it energized on-site two solar arrays — one at its Melville, New York, campus that will produce 1,800 megawatt-hours of power annually, and a smaller one at the Aveda brand's campus in Minnesota. The New York installation will provide 100 percent of the electricity required by the office operations, while the Minnesota one will contribute up to 50 percent — the remainder of its power will come from utility-sourced ...
Also found in: [+]
8 cities share how racial justice is embedded into their climate plans 20.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
8 cities share how racial justice is embedded into their climate plans Jesse Klein Mon, 07/20/2020 - 02:00 As COVID-19 rampages through vulnerable minority populations with tragic consequences, and protests for racial justice surge among a similar demographic, city climate planners see a renewed focus on climate justice. The pandemic, in some ways, has been a trial run for the anticipated coming impacts of climate change — a not-so-distant future in which low-income and minority populations are the most at risk. As mayors make quick strategic changes to address the short-term COVID crisis, they are also in the midst of planning for similar long-term climate issues. Last week, the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group , an organization of mayors from around the global, launched a Detailed Agenda for Green and Just Recovery from COVID-19 to ensure that this crisis propels sustainable innovations instead of a return to old ways.  "Equity is really at the heart of our recovery in the city," said Mayor LaToya ...
Also found in: [+]
20 must-read books about food systems 10.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
20 must-read books about food systems Danielle Nierenberg Fri, 07/10/2020 - 00:50 With record high unemployment , a reeling global economy and concerns of food shortages , the world as we know it is changing. But even as these shifts expose inequities in the health and food systems, many experts hope that the current moment offers an opportunity to build a new, more sustainable food system. To understand what it will take to move forward, Food Tank has compiled its summer reading list to delve into the issues that affect our food system today. These 20 books provide insight into food access and justice in Black communities, food relief and school nutrition programs, the effects of technology on global food supply chains, the relationship between climate change and food production, and much more. 1. " Be My Guest: Reflections on Food, Community, and the Meaning of Generosity " by Priya Basil (forthcoming November) Priya Basil explores the meaning of hospitality within a variety of cultural, linguistic and ...
Also found in: [+]
How to advance equity in energy solutions in the COVID-19 era 6.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How to advance equity in energy solutions in the COVID-19 era Daphany Rose Sanchez Mon, 07/06/2020 - 02:01 During the day I work in the energy sector supporting government and utilities design programs to perform outreach to and educate low-income and diverse communities. At night, I go back into my neighborhood, one thriving with diverse residents. Sitting on both sides of the table, I’d like to share what you need to pay attention to in order to be part of the solution on the interconnected fronts of energy efficiency and social justice. If 2020 has shown residents in the United States something, it's the dire need to understand historical barriers, immediately stop our current way of working and deliver energy solutions. As a New York City resident, director of an energy consulting organization, an advocate of energy equity and a third-generation resident of public housing, I have a unique view of the structural barriers we must break down to solve the global climate crisis. As energy consultants ...
Also found in: [+]
Native Americans are regularly undercounted in the census. COVID-19 will make it worse. 3.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
‘If you want to have a worst-case scenario on doing a census count in any state in Indian Country, it’s now.’
Also found in: [+]
A truly clean energy system runs on a clean conscience 2.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
A truly clean energy system runs on a clean conscience Alec Appelbaum Thu, 07/02/2020 - 01:15 What would you do if the cause that lights your day turned out to be trapping fellow citizens in the dark?  For Shalanda Baker, a professor of law and public policy at Northeastern University, thinking about a clean energy future means thinking about the daily, weekly and sometimes invisible ways that people in deprived communities can control their power supply. Her work — in blogs, scholarship, professional services and a forthcoming book — reminds professionals that deals made on the backs of oppressed people are no deals at all.  Baker recently spoke with the Clean Energy Finance Forum about how her scholarship and an institute she co-runs aim to forge connections from investment committee members to utility executives to neighborhood volunteers. Read on to reckon with how a truly clean energy system runs on a clean conscience.  Alec Appelbaum: How did you start working on empowerment in an energy ...
Also found in: [+]
Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
Also found in: [+]
Navajo ranchers are raising premium beef. 17.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Is their success sustainable?
Also found in: [+]
Episode 224: Biodiversity, climate tech and voices of clean energy equity 12.6.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Features A new angel fund dedicated to decarbonization (18:50) Ramez Naam, futurist and board member for Seattle-based angel investor network E8 , chats about the new Decarbon-8 fund and why seeking racially diverse founders will be a priority. "Because if we are going to help some people build companies in this, and they’re going to profit, as the entrepreneurs should, we’d like some of that to go back into those people, in those communities," he says.  Funding biodiversity (31:14) William Ginn, author of the new book " Valuing Nature ," talks with Associate Editor Deonna Anderson about ways the private sector can address biodiversity. Voices of the clean energy equity movement (48:25) GreenBiz Senior Analyst Sarah Golden shares highlights of conversations with Bartees Cox, director of marketing and communications at Groundswell , an organization that brings community solar to low-income customers; Alexis Cureton, former electric vehicle fellow at GRID Alternatives , which works to bring clean energy ...
Also found in: [+]
How racism manifests in clean energy 5.6.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How racism manifests in clean energy Sarah Golden Fri, 06/05/2020 - 00:00 As our institutions strain under the uprising in cities across the country, I’ve been struggling to comprehend the depth of racism in America. I understand why these moments of police violence, the senseless destruction of black bodies caught on tape, would spark a fire that rages across this country. I also know that the tinder has been building for generations and is about so much more than this one horrific moment. Every sector plays a part. Including clean energy.  It's no secret that there are grave inequities in clean energy. In the spirit of this moment, I turned the microscope on my own sector to ask, how does racism manifest in clean energy?  Manifestation 1: 'I can’t breathe' "I can’t breathe" refers to more than police violence. Black communities have been struggling to breathe for decades.  "The right to breathe isn't just related to surviving interactions with police," said Alexis Cureton, former electric vehicle ...
Also found in: [+]
How racism manifests itself in clean energy 5.6.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
How racism manifests itself in clean energy Sarah Golden Fri, 06/05/2020 - 00:00 As our institutions strain under the uprising in cities across the country, I’ve been struggling to comprehend the depth of racism in America. I understand why these moments of police violence, the senseless destruction of black bodies caught on tape, would spark a fire that rages across this country. I also know that the tinder has been building for generations and is about so much more than this one horrific moment. Every sector plays a part. Including clean energy.  It's no secret that there are grave inequities in clean energy. In the spirit of this moment, I turned the microscope on my own sector to ask, how does racism manifest in clean energy?  Manifestation 1: 'I can’t breathe' "I can’t breathe" refers to more than police violence. Black communities have been struggling to breathe for decades.  "The right to breathe isn't just related to surviving interactions with police," said Alexis Cureton, former electric ...
Also found in: [+]
An opportunity to close Indian Country’s digital divide is expiring 2.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
A government program aimed at reversing the longstanding connectivity issues on tribal lands is complicated by the pandemic.
Also found in: [+]
It's time to prioritize the survival of indigenous people, the world's forest stewards 2.6.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
It's time to prioritize the survival of indigenous people, the world's forest stewards Carol Goodstein Tue, 06/02/2020 - 00:00 Hunting and gathering for food is taking on a whole new meaning of late. The ever-lengthening line at my local Whole Foods starts to wrap around the outside of the store before 7 a.m., as socially distanced shoppers — securely donned in gloves, masks and even plastic face shields — wait nervously to scavenge for their week’s worth of essentials along with their COVID-19 indulgences: the extra bars of Hu chocolates and Enjoy Life cookies, in my family’s case. We once thought of foraging as an activity engaged in only by our very remote ancestors and distant "primitive" people. But the spread of COVID-19 has heightened the subsistence survival instinct in all of us. In a way, we are not so dissimilar from "primitive" people in places such as the Amazon Basin as we might have thought.  And now, we’re all vulnerable to the same pandemic virus. Only with virtually no resistance, no ...
Also found in: [+]
How the Navajo got their day in the sun 28.5.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
How the Navajo got their day in the sun Danny Kennedy Thu, 05/28/2020 - 02:00 In late March, during the early hours of the COVID-19 crisis, just as New Yorkers were realizing how many might die, a small solar development company closed a $4 million financing deal. "Closing" is never easy, but getting a half-dozen high-net-worth individuals, family offices and foundations to pony up as the world’s finance markets crashed around them was a triumph.  Getting the deal done was impressive in its own right, given that private equity had all but frozen in the weeks before and most venture-backed startups were running on fumes, telling their angel investors and anyone who’d listen that they had three months’ financial runway, or less. It seems even more important now, given the terrible toll COVID-19 is having right where the solar is planned: the Navajo Nation. A young team saddled with ambition and support from their tribal government, this largely native-owned company, Navajo Power , was getting ready to ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 2,961