User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Environmental Justice :: Impacts
Last updated: Sep 02 2020 19:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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What sewage can tell us about the spread of COVID-19 2.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
More cities are testing wastewater, but a poor federal response keeps efforts scattered.
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‘Somebody has to keep people on their toes’ 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
High Country News’ unlikely and remarkable origin story.
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Extreme heat is here, and it’s deadly 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Gearing up for the fight against a new climate enemy.
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The erasure of Indigenous people in U.S. COVID-19 data 31.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
“The United States had no idea what was going on in Indian Country. They have no idea.”
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Circular economy startups compete at Circularity 2020, taking on shoes to shelf-life 31.8.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Circular economy startups compete at Circularity 2020, taking on shoes to shelf-life Holly Secon Mon, 08/31/2020 - 01:00 A circular economy is urgently required for the shift to a more sustainable planet. But it will take new, innovative ideas to build a global system that uses and reuses all of the resources within it and moves us away from the deeply entrenched extractive system under which the modern world functions. At Circularity 20, GreenBiz’s online circular economy event, five startups presented their potentially world-altering ideas during the Accelerate competition. This GreenBiz tradition began in 2012 at its VERGE events, offering a venue where startups make a 2.5-minute pitch of their technology to the audience. During last week's event, the online audience voted on its favorite, and an expert panel of Taj Eldridge, senior director of investments at the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI), and Monique Mills, with the Startup Catalyst at the Advanced Technology Development Center at ...
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The Navajo Nation and White Mountain Apache Tribe chase down a virus 28.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Contact-tracing programs in two areas hit hardest by COVID-19 are working.
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How racism adversely affects wildlife, too 24.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
New research exposes how systemic racism physically alters ecosystems for the worse.
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Why the District of Columbia is a leader in energy efficiency 19.8.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Why the District of Columbia is a leader in energy efficiency Catherine Nabukalu Wed, 08/19/2020 - 01:30 One of my favorite sessions from VERGE 2019 was a presentation by Amory Lovins on the expanding energy efficiency cornucopia . Among several things, he discussed the vital benefit of energy efficiency in working toward environmental sustainability through emissions reductions without harming or slowing economic growth.  In various international climate plans, energy efficiency is increasingly prominent . In fact, more cities and the private sector are tapping into its direct economic benefits, such as job creation and its potential to improve people’s livelihoods. The technical fixes register considerable energy savings, prevent energy waste and demonstrate there is still so much we can do to reduce pollution, especially within old existing infrastructure, such as data centers, commercial real estate and transportation systems. In the 2019 scorecard by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient ...
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Trump cancels methane regs intended to quell pollution 17.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
As the climate crisis worsens, oil and gas companies can continue to emit the potent greenhouse gas.
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Thousands forced from their homes despite California’s eviction moratorium 13.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Without clear state orders, a loophole in the law allows sheriff departments decide whether to evict.
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How big oil funds big brother 30.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Some of the largest fossil fuel companies in the nation back police foundations that raise money for weapons, equipment and surveillance technology.
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The Estée Lauder Companies' sustainability leader on racial justice, 'sector-agnostic' solutions 27.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
The Estée Lauder Companies' sustainability leader on racial justice, 'sector-agnostic' solutions Heather Clancy Mon, 07/27/2020 - 01:30 In the four years since Nancy Mahon assumed responsibility for CSR and sustainability strategy at The Estée Lauder Companies — she's currently senior vice president of corporate citizenship and sustainability — her team has launched a series of new initiatives that are a "first" among her organization's sector. The list includes the company's first virtual power purchase agreement for 22 megawatts, a move made in pursuit of its 2020 net-zero carbon emission goal. More recently, it energized on-site two solar arrays — one at its Melville, New York, campus that will produce 1,800 megawatt-hours of power annually, and a smaller one at the Aveda brand's campus in Minnesota. The New York installation will provide 100 percent of the electricity required for its Joseph H. Lauder office facility, while the Minnesota one will contribute up to 50 percent — the remainder of its ...
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Estée Lauder's sustainability leader on racial justice, 'sector-agnostic' solutions 27.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Estée Lauder's sustainability leader on racial justice, 'sector-agnostic' solutions Heather Clancy Mon, 07/27/2020 - 01:30 In the six years since Nancy Mahon assumed responsibility for CSR and sustainability strategy at Estée Lauder Companies — she's currently senior vice president of corporate citizenship and sustainability — her team has launched a series of new initiatives that are a "first" among her organization's sector. The list includes the company's first virtual power purchase agreement for 22 megawatts, a move made in pursuit of its 2020 net-zero carbon emission goal. More recently, it energized on-site two solar arrays — one at its Melville, New York, campus that will produce 1,800 megawatt-hours of power annually, and a smaller one at the Aveda brand's campus in Minnesota. The New York installation will provide 100 percent of the electricity required by the office operations, while the Minnesota one will contribute up to 50 percent — the remainder of its power will come from utility-sourced ...
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Trump admin erodes landmark law protecting communities and the environment 17.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
New National Environmental Policy Act rules limit public input and allow federal agencies to ignore climate impacts of infrastructure projects.
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BofA, Goldman, JPMorgan, Wells Fargo launch center for climate-aligned finance 9.7.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
BofA, Goldman, JPMorgan, Wells Fargo launch center for climate-aligned finance Jesse Klein Thu, 07/09/2020 - 00:01 The Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) is banking on banks to get us over the carbon-neutral finish line by 2050.  The nonprofit announced Wednesday that it’s partnering with four of the world’s largest financial institutions — Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America — to launch the Center for Climate-Aligned Finance . The center will serve as a hub for cross-sector collaboration, bringing traditional financial instruments to innovative ideas to decarbonize the planet.  "It’s not the responsibility of any single country or single sector," said Paul Bodnar, managing director for climate finance at RMI. "But one sector provides the lifeblood that powers all the others and that’s finance."  A new buzzword, climate-aligned finance, is RMI’s answer to the uneven responsibility put on the financial sector. Its goal is to integrate the financial sector’s attempts at going green, ...
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How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice 6.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice Kristoffer Tigue Mon, 07/06/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in InsideClimate News and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. In many ways, Maleta Kimmons defines her neighborhood by what it lacks. Several houses near her home remain vacant. Last week, she had to drive seven miles just to buy groceries. And two weeks ago, at the height of the Minneapolis protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd by a police officer May 25, looters broke into the only pharmacy in the area, forcing the store to close and leaving many in the neighborhood without easy access to life-saving medication such as insulin or inhalers for asthma. Kimmons, who prefers to go by the name Queen, said what her neighborhood doesn't lack is pollution. Near North, where Queen lives, is one of several neighborhoods that make up north Minneapolis, a  predominately ...
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Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
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Poison for profit 1.7.2020 Current Issue
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The housing policy that’s turning back gentrification 30.6.2020 Current Issue
In the wake of COVID-19, some California cities are introducing tenant protections.
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Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni 29.6.2020 GreenBiz.com
Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni Heather Clancy Mon, 06/29/2020 - 02:30 June 22 marked the publication of the fifth annual GreenBiz 30 Under 30 , our report celebrating rising young professionals in the field of corporate sustainability.  What’s up in the worlds of the 120 alumni from past lists? We reached out this spring to check in, asking those inclined to weigh in on how current events have changed their world views. We asked them to consider two questions: With the world turned upside down, what is your focus at work? Do you think the COVID-19 crisis marks a turning point for the sustainability movement?  Following are some of their responses, lightly edited, representing perspective from all four past cohorts. We did not specifically ask the alumni to consider the broader question of systemic racism, as our outreach was completed prior to the national protests triggered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. But look for future updates and essays on this topic, such as ...
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