User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Environmental Justice :: General
Last updated: Jun 08 2018 24:25 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Open letter to York University: Settle with CUPE 3903 now! 7.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar The recent strike at York University is being called the longest labour dispute at the institution, and the longest strike at an English-speaking university in Canada. It has been used by the provincial Liberals to attack the NDP, however the issues are about precarious work and need to be addressed . Instead of taking on these issues, the York University administration has been acting unilaterally and recently walked away from a CUPE 3903 offer which was essentially most of what they wanted.    Over 300 university full-time or retired professors, librarians and archivists at York University have signed the letter below demanding that the York University President and Board of Governers settle with CUPE 3903 now. They shared this letter with rabble.ca.   Open letter to the President of York University and the Board of Governors:  Settle with CUPE 3903 now! We, the undersigned full-time or retired professors, librarians and archivists at York University, are deeply concerned with the ...
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Bringing to environmental justice: Bayou restoration in Louisiana 2.6.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The hurricane-ravaged coastline has a long history of racism — but community-building is trying to change that.
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Why diversity in sustainability matters, and what you can do 23.5.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Here's what some are — and aren't — doing to fight whitewashing in the green movement.
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Court Rules EPA Unlawfully Delayed Environmental Racism Investigations for Decades 6.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Father Phil Schmitter and other advocates from a predominately Black neighborhood in Flint, Michigan filed a civil rights complaint with the EPA more than 20 years before the city became a symbol of environmental racism. The EPA finally completed its investigation into the complaint last year, and only after environmental justice groups took the agency to federal court. Darlene McClendon, 62, at her home in Flint, Michigan, on October 11, 2016. (Photo: Brittany Greeson / For The Washington Post via Getty Images) Exposing the wrongdoing of those in power has never been more important. Support Truthout's independent, investigative journalism by making a donation! A federal court ruled this week that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) violated the Civil Rights Act by delaying investigations into environmental discrimination complaints for years, even decades. For plaintiff Phil Schmitter, a priest and social justice activist from Flint, Michigan, the ruling is a bittersweet victory that was a long ...
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U.S. Superfund sites offer lessons for the future 30.3.2018 GreenBiz.com
Superfund sites are being repurposed as recreational areas, renewable energy facilities and more.
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Can we green cities without causing gentrification? 26.3.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
It takes more than parks, cafes and a riverwalk.
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Why economic 'degrowth' is an ethical imperative 24.3.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
The Global North's economy has created a dire global ecological predicament. Now, we must shift to an economy that respects planetary boundaries.
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New Orleans Approves Natural Gas Power Plant Despite Environmental Racism and Climate Concerns 19.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Opponents of Entergy's proposed natural gas power plant pack the March 8 New Orleans City Council meeting. (All Photos: © Julie Dermansky) Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. Despite hearing over four hours of public comments mostly in opposition, New Orleans City Council recently approved construction of a $210 million natural gas power plant in a predominantly minority neighborhood. Entergy is proposing to build this massive investment in fossil fuel infrastructure in a city already plagued by the effects of climate change.  Choosing a gas plant over renewable energy options flies in the face of the city's own climate change plan and the mayor's support for the Paris Climate Accord, said several of the plant's opponents at the heated meeting when City Council ultimately voted to approve the plant. "It is not enough to plan for how we will adapt to climate change. We must end our contribution to it," wrote Mayor Mitch Landrieu in the ...
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Communities in US and Mexico at Risk From Sewage, Pollution and Disease 4.3.2018 Truthout.com
Thanks to reader support, Truthout can deliver the news seven days a week, 365 days a year. Keep independent journalism going strong: Make a tax-deductible donation right now. Imperial Beach, California -- U.S. Border Patrol Agent Christopher Harris steers his truck along the hilly road next to the border fence separating this beach community in the extreme southwest corner of the U.S. from Tijuana, Baja California's largest city. On a late November afternoon, Harris tours three different canyons along the border. At the bottom of each canyon, a ribbon of dark wastewater originates in Tijuana and flows into the wetlands of the Tijuana Slough National Wildlife Refuge on its way to the Pacific Ocean. Drainage to Pacific Tijuana Slough. (Photo: John Dougherty) No one in the United States is certain whether the effluent is coming from Tijuana's failing wastewater-treatment system or if it is illegally dumped in the canyon creek beds in Tijuana. On this day, it flowed through dry creek beds, where Harris says ...
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The Global Uprising for a More Equitable and Humane Labor Force 22.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Despite the mass corporate media obsession with Donald Trump's reactionary, vulgar and insulting statements, grassroots activity is becoming more energized in the United States and around the globe. In We Are All Fast-Food Workers Now, Annelise Orleck records the movements for a more equitble and humane labor force, speaking with activists and giving grounds for hope. In a world of neoliberal dominance, advocating for fair and deserved worker justice is a challenging task. In this excerpt, Orleck makes the case that workers are rising up around the world to achieve this goal. A demonstrator holds a sign during a protest for higher wages and a union on April 15, 2015, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo: Mark Dixon ) Despite the mass corporate media obsession with Donald Trump's reactionary, vulgar and insulting statements, grassroots activity is becoming more energized in the United States and around the globe. History Professor Annelise Orleck records the movements for a more equitble and humane labor ...
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The missing third party: Corporations and the new social contract 21.2.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
What is a business for? As discontent rises with the side effects of globalization, it's time to reassess.
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Why it's time to align retirement funds with sustainability goals 1.2.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
A new push to move employee investments in 401(k)s and pensions to funds with high ESG ratings.
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Is the DNA of GDP evolving? 24.1.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
A new report from Davos critiques of GDP as an analog for economic success reflects efforts to preserve natural capital and ensure social equity.
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Newly Released Documents Show Dakota Access Pipeline Is Discriminatory Against Native Americans 22.1.2018 Truthout.com
Records obtained recently show that the companies funding the Dakota Access pipeline manipulated their environmental justice assessment of its impact after the pipeline was rerouted from a predominantly white area onto Sioux Tribal land. What's more, it appears that this was done under the active guidance of the US Army Corps of Engineers. A young activist holds a sign during a march in solidarity with Standing Rock Water Protectors in Seattle, Washington, on September 16, 2016. (Photo: John Duffy ) Truthout readers like you made this story possible. Show your support for independent news: Make a tax-deductible donation today! A new year and  five oil-spills  later, the flowing of oil through the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) underneath the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's water supply continues to be a threat to tribal survival. As the Tribe battles to shut down the oil flow through the courts, new information detailing how the pipeline was wrongly placed through Lake Oahe -- the Tribe's main source of ...
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How Trump’s tax bill pits the rich against the poor 4.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
We are witnessing a government restructuring and a cultural divide widening.
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A National Beautification Campaign Revitalized Communities in the '60s and Could Again Today 1.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In the 1960s, Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson's campaign to protect the natural beauty of the United States united Americans during divisive times. The drums of war drowned out Johnson's efforts, but activists believe beauty can unite us again today. Lady Bird Johnson and Stewart Udall in a raft on the Snake River. (Photo: LBJ Library ) Here at Truthout, our commitment to uncovering injustice, disseminating transformative ideas and inspiring action is as steadfast as ever. Will you join us in this mission? "If anything can save the world, I'd put my money on beauty," once declared Doug Tompkins, conservationist and founder of the global clothing giants, The North Face and Esprit. The beauty he meant was not the garments he sold, but the natural beauty of the Earth, and the beauty of well-designed human environments.  In this polarized time, can a campaign for beauty help bring Americans together? I think so. Beauty was once very much a part of the American dialogue and tradition. It animated the paintings ...
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Access to clean water a luxury for some First Nations reserves 30.12.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Krystalline Kraus I recently went to a movie and one of the pre-screening ads was about donating to a global charity that helps people get access to clean water. As I watched the ad, I wondered how many people in that packed theatre knew that it is not only communities in developing nations that struggle for access to clean water. The very same issues are true for some reserves. "Two-thirds of all First Nation communities in Canada have been under at least one drinking water advisory at some time in the last decade," according to a CBC News investigation , and it has not gotten much better in 2017. "The longest-running water advisory is in the Neskantaga First Nation in Ontario, where residents have been boiling their water for 20 years," says the CBC report. In second, third and fourth place are the Nazko First Nation, Alexis Creek First Nation and Lake Babine First Nation, all of which are in British Columbia and have struggled with water issues over the past 16 years. Not that your average Canadian ...
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Children of Color Hit Hardest as Environmental Enforcement Tumbles Under Trump 22.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Lax enforcement at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under this administration is hitting the most vulnerable first, including children of color in Chicago's Southeast Side, who face elevated levels of manganese pollution from two industrial terminals. Meanwhile, the EPA workers' union is criticizing Trump's appointment of a Republican "non-scientist" to head the agency's regional office in Chicago. (Photo: SD Pictures ) Public health researchers have  found  elevated levels of manganese, a heavy metal that can cause neurological disorders and other health problems, under the toenails of children living Chicago's Southeast Side neighborhood. Environmentalists are nearly certain they know why. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been working with two industrial facilities that handle large amounts of manganese on the Southeast Side to reduce dangerous dust drifting into nearby residential areas, but enforcement has lagged since the Trump administration took over the agency, according to ...
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What It's Like Inside the Trump Administration's Regulatory Rollback at the EPA 20.12.2017 Truthout.com
Since Trump was elected, dozens of environmental rules have been either opened for reconsideration or overturned altogether. These regulations would have had far-ranging effects, from banning hazardous pesticides to offshore oil drilling. The effluent rule, which set new limits on water-borne pollution released by coal-fired power plants, was one of the most meticulously researched of the regulations the new EPA leadership is preparing to overturn. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee about the mission of the US Environmental Protection Agency on December 7, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo: Pete Marovich / Getty Images) Betsy Southerland knew something was wrong the moment she walked into her office at the Environmental Protection Agency. It was 8 a.m. on a Thursday in April and already, her team was waiting at her door, computer printouts in hand. For months, staffers in the Office of Water had been in help-desk mode, ...
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China crackdown on environmental regulations hits global supply chains 19.12.2017 TreeHugger
Critics used to call China's ease on regulations unfair. Now crackdowns in the face of popular concerns about pollution ripple through global supply chains.
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