User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Environment
Last updated: Nov 22 2017 18:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Stanford researchers test public receptiveness to different wind energy turbines 22.11.2017 Environmental News Network
With global carbon emissions on the rise, wind power continues to be an attractive option for states and countries looking to limit fossil fuel use and increase renewable energy. Wind already accounts for over 5 percent of electricity generation in the United States. However, a number of issues plague the low-carbon energy source, such as complaints from nearby residents about noise and the killing of hundreds of thousands of birds and bats each year that collide with turbine blades.
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3 phone cases made from sustainable materials 21.11.2017 TreeHugger
Made from upcycled or biodegradable materials, these phone cases are as beautiful as they are eco-friendly.
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Giving thanks for four decades of protecting turkeys 21.11.2017 TreeHugger
The wild turkey is one of the most enduring symbols of Thanksgiving – but you may not know how close we’ve all come to losing these birds. As recently as 1973, there were only about 1.5 million wild turkeys in all of North America.
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NASA Links Port-City Sea Levels to Regional Ice Melt 21.11.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
A new NASA tool links changes in sea level in 293 global port cities to specific regions of melting land ice, such as southern Greenland and the Antarctic Peninsula. It is intended to help coastal planners prepare for rising seas in the decades to come.
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‘Brazil Nut Effect' Helps Explain How Rivers Resist Erosion, Penn Team Finds 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Pop the top off a can of mixed nuts and, chances are, Brazil nuts will be at the top. This phenomenon, of large particles tending to rise to the top of mixtures while small particles tend to sink down, is popularly known as the “Brazil nut effect” and more technically as granular segregation.
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Moon's Crust Underwent Resurfacing After Forming from Magma Ocean 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The Earth’s Moon had a rough start in life. Formed from a chunk of the Earth that was lopped off during a planetary collision, it spent its early years covered by a roiling global ocean of molten magma before cooling and forming the serene surface we know today.
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Turtles & Technology Advance Understanding of Lung Abnormality 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, made the detailed research possible. The work is published in the December 2017 issue of The Journal of Anatomy, the cover of which features an image of the study’s 3D models.
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Refining Pesticides to Kill Pests, Not Bees 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Pyrethroid pesticides are effective. Sometimes too effective.
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Researcher seeks to protect where the wild things walk 21.11.2017 Environmental News Network
UBC research is paving the way for a route that will serve as a pilot project to protect green space and allow wildlife to move throughout the Okanagan Valley.Kelowna was identified in the 2016 Stats Canada census as one of the fastest-growing cities in Canada. With growth comes development and UBC Professor Lael Parrott says the region is in danger of fragmenting low-elevation ecosystems and losing the habitat and movement routes needed by wildlife, especially on the east side of Okanagan Lake.
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How carbon farming can help solve climate change 21.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Under the 2015 Paris Agreement, nations pledged to keep the average global temperature rise to below 2C above pre-industrial levels and to take efforts to narrow that increase to 1.5C. To meet those goals we must not only stop the increase in our greenhouse gas emissions, we must also draw large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere.The simplest, most cost effective and environmentally beneficial way to do this is right under our feet. We can farm carbon by storing it in our agricultural soils.
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Thinking Big by Burning Small 20.11.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks.
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ESO Observations Show First Interstellar Asteroid is Like Nothing Seen Before 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
On 19 October 2017, the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawai`i picked up a faint point of light moving across the sky. It initially looked like a typical fast-moving small asteroid, but additional observations over the next couple of days allowed its orbit to be computed fairly accurately. The orbit calculations revealed beyond any doubt that this body did not originate from inside the Solar System, like all other asteroids or comets ever observed, but instead had come from interstellar space. Although originally classified as a comet, observations from ESO and elsewhere revealed no signs of cometary activity after it passed closest to the Sun in September 2017. The object was reclassified as an interstellar asteroid and named 1I/2017 U1 (`Oumuamua) [1].
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Thinking Big by Burning Small 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks.
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Previous Evidence of Water on Mars Now Identified as Grainflows 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Dark features previously proposed as evidence for significant liquid water flowing on Mars have now been identified as granular flows, where sand and dust move rather than liquid water, according to a new article published in Nature Geoscience by the U.S. Geological Survey.
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Study looks at why ring-tailed lemurs raise a stink when they flirt with potential mates 20.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
A University of Toronto study finds that a unique ritual performed by male ring-tailed lemurs may come at a significant physical cost, but it likely helps their chances in securing a mate.Ring-tailed lemurs are Strepsirrhines, a sub-order of primates who share a common ancestor with humans. They are very social animals, living in large groups with females dominating the group. Like other lemurs, they huddle in large groups in order to keep warm and maintain social bonds, with lower ranking males often excluded.
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Light Green Plants Save Nitrogen Without Sacrificing Photosynthetic Efficiency 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
The top leaves of crops absorb far more light than they can use, starving lower leaves of light. Scientists designed plants with light green leaves with hopes of allowing more light to penetrate the crop canopy and increase overall light use efficiency and yield. This strategy was tested in a recent modeling study that found leaves with reduced chlorophyll content do not actually improve canopy-level photosynthesis, but instead, conserve a significant amount of nitrogen that the plant might be able to reinvest to improve light use efficiency and increase yield.  
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The Hydroponic, Robotic Future of Farming in Greenhouses 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
When you think of automation, you probably think of the assembly line, a dramatic dance of robot arms with nary a human laborer in sight. But that’s child’s play. The grandest, most disruptive automation revolution has played out in agriculture. First with horses and plows, and eventually with burly combines—technologies that have made farming exponentially cheaper and more productive. Just consider that in 1790, farmers made up 90 percent of the US workforce. In 2012, it was 1.5 percent, yet America still eats.
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Reusing Waste Energy with 2D Electron Gas 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Novel approach utilizes high mobility two-dimensional electron gas, boosting thermoelectric conversion efficiency.
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Imagining a New Social Order: Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin in Conversation 19.11.2017 Truthout.com
Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin discuss how the left can save the US from neoliberal excesses. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) In a time of deep political, social and economic uncertainty for everyone (except the ultra-rich), Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin provide some theoretical and practical guidance for the left. This Truthout interview is an effort to help reimagine a realistic social order in an age when the old order is dying but the new has yet to be born. Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin discuss how the left can save the US from neoliberal excesses. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) This story could not have been published without the support of readers like you. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout and fund more stories like it! We live in an age of illegitimate neoliberal hegemony and soaring political uncertainty. The evidence is all around: citizen disillusionment over mainstream political parties and the traditional conservative-liberal divide, massive inequality, ...
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A new way to store thermal energy 18.11.2017 Environmental News Network
In large parts of the developing world, people have abundant heat from the sun during the day, but most cooking takes place later in the evening when the sun is down, using fuel — such as wood, brush or dung — that is collected with significant time and effort.
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