User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Community
Last updated: Jul 09 2020 17:23 IST RSS 2.0
 
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BofA, Goldman, JPMorgan, Wells Fargo launch center for climate-aligned finance 9.7.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
BofA, Goldman, JPMorgan, Wells Fargo launch center for climate-aligned finance Jesse Klein Thu, 07/09/2020 - 00:01 The Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) is banking on banks to get us over the carbon-neutral finish line by 2050.  The nonprofit announced Wednesday that it’s partnering with four of the world’s largest financial institutions — Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America — to launch the Center for Climate-Aligned Finance . The center will serve as a hub for cross-sector collaboration, bringing traditional financial instruments to innovative ideas to decarbonize the planet.  "It’s not the responsibility of any single country or single sector," said Paul Bodnar, managing director for climate finance at RMI. "But one sector provides the lifeblood that powers all the others and that’s finance."  A new buzzword, climate-aligned finance, is RMI’s answer to the uneven responsibility put on the financial sector. Its goal is to integrate the financial sector’s attempts at going green, ...
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Activists push for Black land ownership in Seattle 7.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Protests over racial equity prompt investments in the city’s Black community.
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How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice 6.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice Kristoffer Tigue Mon, 07/06/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in InsideClimate News and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. In many ways, Maleta Kimmons defines her neighborhood by what it lacks. Several houses near her home remain vacant. Last week, she had to drive seven miles just to buy groceries. And two weeks ago, at the height of the Minneapolis protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd by a police officer May 25, looters broke into the only pharmacy in the area, forcing the store to close and leaving many in the neighborhood without easy access to life-saving medication such as insulin or inhalers for asthma. Kimmons, who prefers to go by the name Queen, said what her neighborhood doesn't lack is pollution. Near North, where Queen lives, is one of several neighborhoods that make up north Minneapolis, a  predominately ...
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Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
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Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni 29.6.2020 GreenBiz.com
Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni Heather Clancy Mon, 06/29/2020 - 02:30 June 22 marked the publication of the fifth annual GreenBiz 30 Under 30 , our report celebrating rising young professionals in the field of corporate sustainability.  What’s up in the worlds of the 120 alumni from past lists? We reached out this spring to check in, asking those inclined to weigh in on how current events have changed their world views. We asked them to consider two questions: With the world turned upside down, what is your focus at work? Do you think the COVID-19 crisis marks a turning point for the sustainability movement?  Following are some of their responses, lightly edited, representing perspective from all four past cohorts. We did not specifically ask the alumni to consider the broader question of systemic racism, as our outreach was completed prior to the national protests triggered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. But look for future updates and essays on this topic, such as ...
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How Black environmentalists are organizing to save the planet from injustice 26.6.2020 GreenBiz.com
How Black environmentalists are organizing to save the planet from injustice Rachel Ramirez Fri, 06/26/2020 - 00:30 This story originally appeared in Grist;  and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. "I can’t breathe." These were among the final words that George Floyd and Eric Garner gasped before their deaths at the hands of white police officers. That plea has become part of the current rallying cry for racial justice and an end to police brutality in the United States. But for Black people living near industrial facilities, the phrase has an additional layer of meaning: a reminder of their disproportionate pollution burden. "While many in power seemed surprised that COVID-19 is killing twice as many Black Americans, those of us in the environmental justice movement know that the health impacts of cumulative and disproportionate levels of pollution in our communities have created underlying health ...
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Where does Pride fit in a time of COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter? 25.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
For organizers and participants, this is a chance to return to the roots of Pride — a fight for equity.
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The West has a role in reimagining the U.S. 23.6.2020 Current Issue
Our notion of ‘American exceptionalism’ has collapsed. What will replace it?
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Coronavirus concerns revive labor organizing 18.6.2020 Current Issue
Washington fruit packers seek lasting gains from pandemic strikes.
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Seattle volunteers look out for Black Lives Matter demonstrators 11.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
As protests continue, mutual aid networks have sprouted up to provide food, medical assistance and rides home.
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There’s already an alternative to calling the police 11.6.2020 Current Issue
A 31-year-old program in Eugene, Oregon, is a model in de-escalating situations that could end with law enforcement violence.
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How sustainability professionals can uplift the black community 8.6.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
How sustainability professionals can uplift the black community Jarami Bond Mon, 06/08/2020 - 02:11 Dear Sustainability Community, I come to you again. It’s been three years since writing my first article for GreenBiz, " Why diversity is the key to unlocking sustainability ." I provided a quick glimpse of the anxiety and pain that the black community feels daily and actionable steps that the sustainability community could take to advocate for diversity and stimulate unprecedented change. I write to you again today with heavy grief and a set of earnest pleas: As sustainability professionals, we must lead the cultivation of a more inclusive, equitable and safe world for all. We not only must steward the environment, but also explore ways to meet the needs of the vulnerable and create healthy platforms for people of all backgrounds to embrace commonalities, celebrate differences and heal tensions. If not us, then who? Ahmaud Arbery. Breonna Taylor. George Floyd. Say their names. These are just a few of many ...
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What really is antifa? 5.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Effie Baum, an ‘everyday anti-fascist,’ talks about President Trump’s threat to designate the movement as a terrorist organization, and corrects the record.
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Why George Floyd protests resonated so early in Denver 5.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
After years of community pressure for police reform, the city was primed for protest.
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A tightrope walk ahead for corporate sustainability managers 3.6.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
A tightrope walk ahead for corporate sustainability managers Rajat Panwar Wed, 06/03/2020 - 00:00 Amidst numerous uncertainties surrounding post-COVID corporate climate, one thing is certain: Sustainability managers will face multifaceted challenges.  Many could face budget cuts, even as their stakeholders expect them to ramp up sustainability efforts and seize this unique "opportunity" to initiate fundamental corporate transformations. Many may find their companies’ post COVID-19 business strategies are no longer aligned with ongoing or planned sustainability programs. The job of a sustainability manager never has been easy, it will become even more challenging during economically turbulent times.  After the 2008 economic recession, I led a study to show that companies generally scaled down sustainability programs during periods of lowered financial performance, but they did so rather selectively. This study also shows that the extent of scaling down is contingent upon the level of economic turbulence. ...
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This moment: An open letter to the GreenBiz community 2.6.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
This moment: An open letter to the GreenBiz community Joel Makower Tue, 06/02/2020 - 02:11 In the wee hours of Nov. 9, 2016, shortly after Donald Trump was declared the 45th president of the United States, I sat down and penned a note to the GreenBiz community. A lot of us were shocked, confused, depressed and angry that this vulgar man, who saw climate change as a hoax and "beautiful clean coal" as our savior, would be setting the national agenda at such a critical time. It was "a stunning and devastating indictment of decency, fairness and inclusion," I wrote that morning. And: It will be critically important, for both our individual sanity and our collective future, that we stay the course, double down, make every program, project, partnership and product count. That was then. The past few days, in the wake of the national upheaval over the death of yet another black man at the hands of yet another white police officer, have been similarly filled with angst and anger within the sustainability ...
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#BlackBirdersWeek takes on systemic racism 1.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
‘The whole purpose is to highlight and showcase Black birders, and anybody can do that.’
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How a small Arizona town is building ecological resilience 26.5.2020 Current Issue
A younger generation of activists are being trained in conservation.
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The decarbonization promise of indoor agriculture is still in the seed stage 22.5.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
The decarbonization promise of indoor agriculture is still in the seed stage Jim Giles Fri, 05/22/2020 - 01:18 Here’s a tale of two chefs. Both are based in the Midwest and both are preparing a Caesar salad. One uses lettuce shipped from where much of our lettuce is grown: The fields around Monterey, California. The other sources her greens from a nearby indoor farm. Out in Monterey, the farmer used diesel-powered machinery, pumped water, fertilizer and pesticides. At the indoor farm, precision systems provided the lettuce with exactly the amount of water and nutrients the crop requires — and no more. The pickers in California discarded lettuces that didn’t look perfect. That wasn't an issue indoors: Conditions are so well controlled that almost all the crop met consumers’ exacting standards. Finally, when the crop was packed and ready, the indoor farmer drove 20 miles or so to drop the lettuce at our chef’s restaurant. The Monterey produce had to travel 2,000 miles. Which chef is preparing the more ...
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AB InBev VP: Our quest for 'agile' sustainable development continues 19.5.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
AB InBev VP: Our quest for 'agile' sustainable development continues Heather Clancy Tue, 05/19/2020 - 02:37 Like most big companies with a complex multinational footprint, Anheuser-Busch InBev's sales slipped in the first quarter and the beer maker is embracing new financial discipline amid the coronavirus pandemic. But the company also has  acted quickly to prop up key members of its value chain — from small liquor stores to farmers to  restaurants  — and the situation has galvanized its long-term corporate sustainability plans, according to Ezgi Barcenas, vice president of global sustainability for AB InBev. "We really cannot lose these learnings and agility, and I think that's been a great learning and contribution of the pandemic — helping us to be more agile and to be more collaborative," she told GreenBiz during an interview in early May. The beermaker’s 2025 goals pledge bold advances in water strategy, returnable or recyclable packaging, renewable energy procurement (its U.S. division in 2019 ...
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