User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Environmental Justice :: EJ Projects
Last updated: Feb 14 2019 22:23 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Youth climate conference builds momentum around Canadian Green New Deal 14.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Sophia Reuss Several hundred youth are gathering in Ottawa to kick off a recurring youth climate conference called PowerShift. This year's event, called " PowerShift: Young and Rising ," is a four-day convergence starting February 14 that draws young people from across the country for workshops and keynote lectures by prominent activists like Kanahus Manuel, Harsha Walia, Derek Nepinak, and Romeo Saganash. Organizers say the aim of the conference is to galvanize youth around the climate change and Indigenous rights movements. This year's PowerShift comes amid the youth movement that led to the recent launch of the Green New Deal in the U.S. and an upcoming federal election. "This is a moment to bring youth together and organize them in the leadup to the federal election, to demand much bolder climate action from the federal government and the kind of bold Green New Deal that we're seeing coming out of the U.S.," said Emma Jackson, an organizer with Climate Justice Edmonton and 350 Canada, in an interview ...
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5 things to look for in the Green New Deal 6.2.2019 GreenBiz.com
From job losses to carbon taxes to just what clean energy means, anyway, here's what to watch in the new policy proposal.
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What killed Washington’s carbon tax? 21.1.2019 Current Issue
The curious death of 1631 and what it says about the future of addressing climate change.
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Report Report: Diversity, Disclosure, CDP and the SDGs 2.1.2019 GreenBiz.com
The latest crop of research reports on sustainable business, climate and cleantech topics.
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Hunting faces an ethical reckoning 18.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Gruesome social media videos show how far modern hunting has drifted from its roots.
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Quebec's new government putting up barriers to cultural diversity and ignoring the environment 12.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Will Dubitsky Quebec's new provincial government, formed for the first time by the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) under the leadership of Premier François Legault, brings with it a new approach that proposes to shift the way the province manages immigration, deals with minority religious groups, represents Montreal and addresses climate change. These changes were outlined during the campaign. The shift that has received the most attention so far deals with religious symbols, a matter that Legault said he will handle himself. The new government aims to restrict all public employees in a position of authority -- judges, law enforcement officers, correctional employees and teachers -- from wearing religious symbols. The move is based, Legault has said, on the need to separate religion and the state. On October 3, new deputy premier Geneviève Guilbault announced that public officials would have a choice of removing their religious symbols or finding another job elsewhere in the public service. But the current ...
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Quebec’s new government putting up barriers to cultural diversity and ignoring the environment 12.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Will Dubitsky Quebec’s new provincial government, formed for the first time by the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) under the leadership of Premier François Legault, brings with it a new approach that proposes to shift the way the province manages immigration, deals with minority religious groups, represents Montreal and addresses climate change. These changes were outlined during the campaign. The shift that has received the most attention so far deals with religious symbols, a matter that Legault said he will handle himself. The new government aims to restrict all public employees in a position of authority – judges, law enforcement officers, correctional employees and teachers – from wearing religious symbols.  The move is based, Legault has said, on the need to separate religion and the state. On October 3, new deputy premier Geneviève Guilbault announced that public officials would have a choice of removing their religious symbols or finding another job elsewhere in the public service. But the current ...
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Onward toward gender equity in the era of climate change 21.9.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
It's critical that we make global women's empowerment a key piece of our resilience plans.
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It's up to Indigenous and environmental groups to protect the public interest 19.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Pamela Palmater Despite objections from some of the Indigenous groups about the consultation process, the Federal Court of Appeal (in Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. v. Canada (Attorney General) 2018 FCA 153) held that Canada acted in good faith and that the consultation framework it used was appropriate. This was a four-phase process which was to include (1) early engagement, (2) National Energy Board (NEB) hearing, (3) governor-in-council consideration and (4) regulatory authorization processes. Where Canada fell down was in Phase III of the consultation process in that it did not meaningfully consider the concerns of the Indigenous groups or attempt to accommodate or mitigate those concerns. There was no substantive discussion about Indigenous rights and the Federal Court of Appeal found that federal officials did little more than act as "note-takers." The court agreed with the Indigenous groups that Canada's notes, referred to as the Consultation Chronologies, "should be approached with caution" for ...
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Ontario fightback: Progressive MPPs headed to Queens Park speak out 28.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar On June 29 Ontarians will have a new premier who takes power with a Progressive Conservative majority government. However, Ontarians also elected some amazing progressive candidates, and at rabble.ca we intend to amplify what people are doing to stand for what Ontarians want and to continue to support progressive change. This is the first of a new Activist Toolkit series on Ontario's fightback against proposed cutbacks and attacks on the things you believe are important. Tell us about what you are doing by sending an email to maya[at]rabble.ca. To launch the series, we reached out to all the progressive MPPs who were elected and asked them three questions: why they ran, what they heard at doors, and what we can do to help them stand for Ontarians. After a hard-fought campaign, the slate of MPPs headed to Queens Park are busy and need time to recuperate. We are so grateful to (in no particular order) France Gélinas (Nickel Belt), Peter Tabuns (Toronto Danforth), Laura Mae Lindo  (Kitchener ...
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Bringing to environmental justice: Bayou restoration in Louisiana 2.6.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The hurricane-ravaged coastline has a long history of racism — but community-building is trying to change that.
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Dropping the ball: how the sports industry affects biodiversity 1.6.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
A Q&A with Giulia Carbone of IUCN on how she works with key stakeholders to turn challenges in the sports industry into sustainable opportunities.
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Court Rules EPA Unlawfully Delayed Environmental Racism Investigations for Decades 6.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Father Phil Schmitter and other advocates from a predominately Black neighborhood in Flint, Michigan filed a civil rights complaint with the EPA more than 20 years before the city became a symbol of environmental racism. The EPA finally completed its investigation into the complaint last year, and only after environmental justice groups took the agency to federal court. Darlene McClendon, 62, at her home in Flint, Michigan, on October 11, 2016. (Photo: Brittany Greeson / For The Washington Post via Getty Images) Exposing the wrongdoing of those in power has never been more important. Support Truthout's independent, investigative journalism by making a donation! A federal court ruled this week that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) violated the Civil Rights Act by delaying investigations into environmental discrimination complaints for years, even decades. For plaintiff Phil Schmitter, a priest and social justice activist from Flint, Michigan, the ruling is a bittersweet victory that was a long ...
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We Are All Fast Food Workers Now 21.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! "Many people are angered by the cruelties of the twenty-first-century economy. And their fury has fueled worldwide protest. Simultaneously, and almost everywhere, low-wage workers and small farmers began to revolt: in New York City restaurants, laundries, and warehouses, in Western Cape wineries and the garment shops of Phnom Penh, in Southern California Walmarts, and the big hotels of Providence, Oslo, Karachi, and Abuja. As capital has globalized, so has the labor movement. Marches, strikes, protests, and sit-ins from Tampa to Mali have changed the global conversation about workers' rights." So writes Annelise Orleck in her new book We Are All Fast Food Workers Now: The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages -- which, as she explains on this week's episode of Off-Kilter, tells the story behind the growing global labor movement ...
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New Orleans Approves Natural Gas Power Plant Despite Environmental Racism and Climate Concerns 19.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Opponents of Entergy's proposed natural gas power plant pack the March 8 New Orleans City Council meeting. (All Photos: © Julie Dermansky) Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. Despite hearing over four hours of public comments mostly in opposition, New Orleans City Council recently approved construction of a $210 million natural gas power plant in a predominantly minority neighborhood. Entergy is proposing to build this massive investment in fossil fuel infrastructure in a city already plagued by the effects of climate change.  Choosing a gas plant over renewable energy options flies in the face of the city's own climate change plan and the mayor's support for the Paris Climate Accord, said several of the plant's opponents at the heated meeting when City Council ultimately voted to approve the plant. "It is not enough to plan for how we will adapt to climate change. We must end our contribution to it," wrote Mayor Mitch Landrieu in the ...
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As US Military Flies Overhead, Okinawa Residents Live Under a Cloud of Fear 9.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
A spate of US military aircraft accidents, incidents and emergency landings have many in Okinawa fearing for their safety. The Japanese southern islands comprise less than 1 percent of Japan's territory by host roughly 70 percent of US military bases. (Photo: Jon Letman) Residents of Okinawa live in constant fear of US military aircraft crashing in their midst or dropping loose parts, as one helicopter recently did at a nursery school. The US presence also exposes residents -- who are calling for an end to the occupation of their land -- to automobile accidents, pollution, noise, crime, sexual violence and environmental degradation. A spate of US military aircraft accidents, incidents and emergency landings have many in Okinawa fearing for their safety. The Japanese southern islands comprise less than 1 percent of Japan's territory by host roughly 70 percent of US military bases. (Photo: Jon Letman) The following article could only be published thanks to support from our readers. To fund more stories ...
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The Global Uprising for a More Equitable and Humane Labor Force 22.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Despite the mass corporate media obsession with Donald Trump's reactionary, vulgar and insulting statements, grassroots activity is becoming more energized in the United States and around the globe. In We Are All Fast-Food Workers Now, Annelise Orleck records the movements for a more equitble and humane labor force, speaking with activists and giving grounds for hope. In a world of neoliberal dominance, advocating for fair and deserved worker justice is a challenging task. In this excerpt, Orleck makes the case that workers are rising up around the world to achieve this goal. A demonstrator holds a sign during a protest for higher wages and a union on April 15, 2015, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo: Mark Dixon ) Despite the mass corporate media obsession with Donald Trump's reactionary, vulgar and insulting statements, grassroots activity is becoming more energized in the United States and around the globe. History Professor Annelise Orleck records the movements for a more equitble and humane labor ...
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What White People Can Do for Food Justice 29.1.2018 Truthout.com
People of color have been working for food justice for decades. They need resources. Chef Nadine Nelson, creator of Master Cooks Corps train-the-trainer program, says white people in the food movement should ask: What are you doing to hold yourself accountable to people of color? Best-selling author Mark Bittman prepares lunch in Washington, DC, on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Photo: Nikki Kahn / The Washington Post via Getty Images)   Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! It is possible that the rich and famous can offer more to society than glimpses into their opulent lifestyles. The cult of celebrity today goes beyond our desire and admiration of superstars' expensive clothes, cars, and houses. We want to know where they stand on important issues that impact our lives, like racism, sexual violence, the environment, food and land reform. To our consolation, some of them are actually using their platforms to stand ...
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Newly Released Documents Show Dakota Access Pipeline Is Discriminatory Against Native Americans 22.1.2018 Truthout.com
Records obtained recently show that the companies funding the Dakota Access pipeline manipulated their environmental justice assessment of its impact after the pipeline was rerouted from a predominantly white area onto Sioux Tribal land. What's more, it appears that this was done under the active guidance of the US Army Corps of Engineers. A young activist holds a sign during a march in solidarity with Standing Rock Water Protectors in Seattle, Washington, on September 16, 2016. (Photo: John Duffy ) Truthout readers like you made this story possible. Show your support for independent news: Make a tax-deductible donation today! A new year and  five oil-spills  later, the flowing of oil through the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) underneath the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's water supply continues to be a threat to tribal survival. As the Tribe battles to shut down the oil flow through the courts, new information detailing how the pipeline was wrongly placed through Lake Oahe -- the Tribe's main source of ...
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The New Resistance in Iran: An Interview With Frieda Afary 11.1.2018 Truthout.com
Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! Iranian workers and the poor, mostly teens and unemployed young adults, have staged a wave of protests that is shaking the country, particularly the religious and political elite. These are not the first protests against the Islamic Republic. In 2009, democracy activists built the Green Movement in opposition to then-President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's rigging of elections that returned the hard-liner to power. More recently, anger at growing class inequality has been the driving motive for strikes and actions over the last two years -- against a new president, Hassan Rouhani, who is associated with reform forces. In many ways, these economic protests have culminated in the current dramatic protest movement that swept through Iran over the last couple of weeks. Frieda Afary is an Iranian-American librarian and translator, producer of ...
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