User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Environmental Justice :: EJ Projects
Last updated: Jun 03 2019 14:27 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Where our past 30 Under 30 honorees are today 3.6.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Here's a sampling of the latest activities from among the 120 outstanding young professionals we've named since 2016.
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Beyond corporate philanthropy: How steel company ArcelorMittal evolved its community engagement 1.6.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
With executive director for corporate responsibility Marcy Twete, the company is expanding impact and moving the industry.
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Energy equity: bringing solar power to low-income communities 23.5.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
From New York to California, states are adopting “community solar” programs that bring solar power and lower energy bills to low-income households.
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It takes all kinds to make a cabinet, not necessarily good news when Kenney's making the picks 1.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Premier Jason Kenney's United Conservative Party cabinet contains a guy who once went down south to campaign for Donald Trump, a woman who opposes school gay-straight alliances and wrote a university president attacking a professor's critical commentary on Catholic education, a man who fired a single mom he employed after she complained about sexual harassment, and a fellow who says the folks in his riding came from "superior stock," even if that "reeks of 'Arian' undertones." Other than that, though, they mostly seem OK at first glance! I'll leave it to readers to decide whether that's good news or bad news. Kenney was sworn in as premier at about 10 a.m. yesterday and his Calgary-heavy 23-member cabinet (20 if you don't count the "associate" members) took the oath immediately afterward at Government House in Edmonton. As befitted the occasion, it was snowing outside. Count on it, the new UCP cabinet will get down to business quickly enacting the radical ideas in Kenney's Revenge ...
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The righteousness of the youth-led climate justice movement 30.4.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
A global movement being led by your company's future employees, neighbors and customers should be of considerable interest, and more than a little concern.
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Student organizers report back on March 15 climate strike 20.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar Many of us supported and were heartened by students coming out on March 15 to demand that local and federal government take real steps to combat climate change. There were many great interviews and news stories which talked to kids out on the street . The Activist Toolkit, however, decided to take a different approach. I contacted all the local organizers I could find and asked them: 1. How did your local climate strike go? 2. What worked and what did not? 3. What will you be doing for the national day of action in Canada on May 3? 4. What did some of the students that participated say? 5. What are you trying to win in your communities? I am posting edited versions of the responses I received below. If you would like to connect about your experience organizing the strike in your community, please send it my way. The Activist Toolkit will continue stay in touch with organizers and continue to help support the demand for real action on climate change. The reports below are the personal ...
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25 badass women shaking up the corporate climate movement 8.3.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
From determined diplomats to compassionate policy experts to pragmatic executives, they are role models for any gender.
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Indigenous land defenders and anti-fascist activists challenge United We Roll convoy 27.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Political Action Indigenous Solidarity Ottawa and Ottawa Against Fascism organized a highly successful "Stand Up for Land Defenders!" direct action to challenge the "United We Roll" truck convoy when it arrived in Ottawa on February 19. The convoy was pro-tar sands (expressing support for the building of pipelines), anti-Bill C-48 (the Oil Tanker Moratorium that restricts oil tankers on the north coast of British Columbia), anti-Bill C-69 (an act primarily on the approval process for pipelines), and anti-carbon tax (that would tax carbon pollution at C$20 a tonne). The convoy also brought messages from Yellow Vests Canada (not to be confused with the more progressive gilets jaunes in France), opposing "illegal" immigration (targeting the non-binding United Nations Global Migration Pact), and the UN more generally, including its 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that reflects the right to water and sanitation. Messages of hate A truck that arrived with the convoy had a huge sign on it that read "no" ...
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The kids are alright 27.2.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
James Murray reflects on school strikes, theories of change and vegan sausage rolls.
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Youth climate conference builds momentum around Canadian Green New Deal 14.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Sophia Reuss Several hundred youth are gathering in Ottawa to kick off a recurring youth climate conference called PowerShift. This year's event, called " PowerShift: Young and Rising ," is a four-day convergence starting February 14 that draws young people from across the country for workshops and keynote lectures by prominent activists like Kanahus Manuel, Harsha Walia, Derek Nepinak, and Romeo Saganash. Organizers say the aim of the conference is to galvanize youth around the climate change and Indigenous rights movements. This year's PowerShift comes amid the youth movement that led to the recent launch of the Green New Deal in the U.S. and an upcoming federal election. "This is a moment to bring youth together and organize them in the leadup to the federal election, to demand much bolder climate action from the federal government and the kind of bold Green New Deal that we're seeing coming out of the U.S.," said Emma Jackson, an organizer with Climate Justice Edmonton and 350 Canada, in an interview ...
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5 things to look for in the Green New Deal 6.2.2019 GreenBiz.com
From job losses to carbon taxes to just what clean energy means, anyway, here's what to watch in the new policy proposal.
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What killed Washington’s carbon tax? 21.1.2019 Current Issue
The curious death of 1631 and what it says about the future of addressing climate change.
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Report Report: Diversity, Disclosure, CDP and the SDGs 2.1.2019 GreenBiz.com
The latest crop of research reports on sustainable business, climate and cleantech topics.
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Hunting faces an ethical reckoning 18.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Gruesome social media videos show how far modern hunting has drifted from its roots.
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Quebec's new government putting up barriers to cultural diversity and ignoring the environment 12.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Will Dubitsky Quebec's new provincial government, formed for the first time by the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) under the leadership of Premier François Legault, brings with it a new approach that proposes to shift the way the province manages immigration, deals with minority religious groups, represents Montreal and addresses climate change. These changes were outlined during the campaign. The shift that has received the most attention so far deals with religious symbols, a matter that Legault said he will handle himself. The new government aims to restrict all public employees in a position of authority -- judges, law enforcement officers, correctional employees and teachers -- from wearing religious symbols. The move is based, Legault has said, on the need to separate religion and the state. On October 3, new deputy premier Geneviève Guilbault announced that public officials would have a choice of removing their religious symbols or finding another job elsewhere in the public service. But the current ...
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Quebec’s new government putting up barriers to cultural diversity and ignoring the environment 12.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Will Dubitsky Quebec’s new provincial government, formed for the first time by the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) under the leadership of Premier François Legault, brings with it a new approach that proposes to shift the way the province manages immigration, deals with minority religious groups, represents Montreal and addresses climate change. These changes were outlined during the campaign. The shift that has received the most attention so far deals with religious symbols, a matter that Legault said he will handle himself. The new government aims to restrict all public employees in a position of authority – judges, law enforcement officers, correctional employees and teachers – from wearing religious symbols.  The move is based, Legault has said, on the need to separate religion and the state. On October 3, new deputy premier Geneviève Guilbault announced that public officials would have a choice of removing their religious symbols or finding another job elsewhere in the public service. But the current ...
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Onward toward gender equity in the era of climate change 21.9.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
It's critical that we make global women's empowerment a key piece of our resilience plans.
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It's up to Indigenous and environmental groups to protect the public interest 19.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Pamela Palmater Despite objections from some of the Indigenous groups about the consultation process, the Federal Court of Appeal (in Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. v. Canada (Attorney General) 2018 FCA 153) held that Canada acted in good faith and that the consultation framework it used was appropriate. This was a four-phase process which was to include (1) early engagement, (2) National Energy Board (NEB) hearing, (3) governor-in-council consideration and (4) regulatory authorization processes. Where Canada fell down was in Phase III of the consultation process in that it did not meaningfully consider the concerns of the Indigenous groups or attempt to accommodate or mitigate those concerns. There was no substantive discussion about Indigenous rights and the Federal Court of Appeal found that federal officials did little more than act as "note-takers." The court agreed with the Indigenous groups that Canada's notes, referred to as the Consultation Chronologies, "should be approached with caution" for ...
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Ontario fightback: Progressive MPPs headed to Queens Park speak out 28.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar On June 29 Ontarians will have a new premier who takes power with a Progressive Conservative majority government. However, Ontarians also elected some amazing progressive candidates, and at rabble.ca we intend to amplify what people are doing to stand for what Ontarians want and to continue to support progressive change. This is the first of a new Activist Toolkit series on Ontario's fightback against proposed cutbacks and attacks on the things you believe are important. Tell us about what you are doing by sending an email to maya[at]rabble.ca. To launch the series, we reached out to all the progressive MPPs who were elected and asked them three questions: why they ran, what they heard at doors, and what we can do to help them stand for Ontarians. After a hard-fought campaign, the slate of MPPs headed to Queens Park are busy and need time to recuperate. We are so grateful to (in no particular order) France Gélinas (Nickel Belt), Peter Tabuns (Toronto Danforth), Laura Mae Lindo  (Kitchener ...
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Bringing to environmental justice: Bayou restoration in Louisiana 2.6.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The hurricane-ravaged coastline has a long history of racism — but community-building is trying to change that.
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