User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Campus
Last updated: Nov 22 2017 02:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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‘Brazil Nut Effect' Helps Explain How Rivers Resist Erosion, Penn Team Finds 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Pop the top off a can of mixed nuts and, chances are, Brazil nuts will be at the top. This phenomenon, of large particles tending to rise to the top of mixtures while small particles tend to sink down, is popularly known as the “Brazil nut effect” and more technically as granular segregation.
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Moon's Crust Underwent Resurfacing After Forming from Magma Ocean 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The Earth’s Moon had a rough start in life. Formed from a chunk of the Earth that was lopped off during a planetary collision, it spent its early years covered by a roiling global ocean of molten magma before cooling and forming the serene surface we know today.
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Turtles & Technology Advance Understanding of Lung Abnormality 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, made the detailed research possible. The work is published in the December 2017 issue of The Journal of Anatomy, the cover of which features an image of the study’s 3D models.
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Refining Pesticides to Kill Pests, Not Bees 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Pyrethroid pesticides are effective. Sometimes too effective.
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Researcher seeks to protect where the wild things walk 21.11.2017 Environmental News Network
UBC research is paving the way for a route that will serve as a pilot project to protect green space and allow wildlife to move throughout the Okanagan Valley.Kelowna was identified in the 2016 Stats Canada census as one of the fastest-growing cities in Canada. With growth comes development and UBC Professor Lael Parrott says the region is in danger of fragmenting low-elevation ecosystems and losing the habitat and movement routes needed by wildlife, especially on the east side of Okanagan Lake.
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Thinking Big by Burning Small 20.11.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks.
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Thinking Big by Burning Small 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks.
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Previous Evidence of Water on Mars Now Identified as Grainflows 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Dark features previously proposed as evidence for significant liquid water flowing on Mars have now been identified as granular flows, where sand and dust move rather than liquid water, according to a new article published in Nature Geoscience by the U.S. Geological Survey.
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Study looks at why ring-tailed lemurs raise a stink when they flirt with potential mates 20.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
A University of Toronto study finds that a unique ritual performed by male ring-tailed lemurs may come at a significant physical cost, but it likely helps their chances in securing a mate.Ring-tailed lemurs are Strepsirrhines, a sub-order of primates who share a common ancestor with humans. They are very social animals, living in large groups with females dominating the group. Like other lemurs, they huddle in large groups in order to keep warm and maintain social bonds, with lower ranking males often excluded.
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As Zimbabwe's Mugabe Refuses to Resign, Advocates Say Coup "Is Not the Answer" for Meaningful Reform 20.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In Zimbabwe, longtime leader Robert Mugabe is refusing to resign as president amid a growing political crisis. Last week Mugabe was placed under house arrest after Zimbabwe's military seized parliament, courts, government offices, and the main airport in the capital, Harare. The apparent coup came a week after President Mugabe ousted his Vice President, Emmerson Mnangagwa, who's since been named by the military as interim president. Members of Zimbabwe's ruling party are preparing to meet to discuss Mugabe's impeachment, after the deadline for him to resign came and went this morning. On Sunday, Mugabe gave a televised address acknowledging the country's problems, but did not mention stepping down. Zimbabwe's ruling party, ZANU-PF, has expelled Mugabe and First Lady Grace Mugabe from the party. Impeachment proceedings against Mugabe may now begin as soon as Tuesday. For more we're joined by Glen Mpani, Mason fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is a democracy and ...
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Light Green Plants Save Nitrogen Without Sacrificing Photosynthetic Efficiency 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
The top leaves of crops absorb far more light than they can use, starving lower leaves of light. Scientists designed plants with light green leaves with hopes of allowing more light to penetrate the crop canopy and increase overall light use efficiency and yield. This strategy was tested in a recent modeling study that found leaves with reduced chlorophyll content do not actually improve canopy-level photosynthesis, but instead, conserve a significant amount of nitrogen that the plant might be able to reinvest to improve light use efficiency and increase yield.  
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Reusing Waste Energy with 2D Electron Gas 20.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Novel approach utilizes high mobility two-dimensional electron gas, boosting thermoelectric conversion efficiency.
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After Georgia Tech Police-Perpetrated Shooting of Non-Binary Student, Atlanta Police Crack Down on Student Dissent 20.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
As police repression has unfolded across Atlanta-area colleges, right-wing groups like the Georgia Tech Marksman Club and the neo-fascist Identity Evropa have exploited the police-perpetrated shooting of an LGBT activist to build support for campus police -- all while Georgia Tech president G.P. Peterson has peddled fear about "outside agitators" intent on "inciting violence" on campus. (Photo: FsHH ; Edited: LW / TO)   This story was published because of support from readers like you. If you care about maintaining a free and independent media, make a donation to Truthout! When Georgia Tech Police Officer Tyler Beck fatally shot 21-year-old computer engineering student Scout Schultz through the heart on September 16, Schultz was holding a multitool containing a small knife  that was not displayed . It was the very same tool friends of Schultz say they saw Schultz use in weeks prior to scrape off white supremacist Identity Evropa propaganda posted around campus. Schultz, who was president of Georgia ...
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Mismanagement, Fraud and Worker Abuse at Charter Schools Are Driving School Staff to Unionize 20.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Unionized teachers with ASPIRA charter school network rally outside an ASPIRA high school to convince the company's management to come to terms on a contract on March 9, 2017, in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Scott Olson / Getty Images) Charter school teachers and staff are increasingly seeking union representation. Issues such as job security, salary, benefits and decent working hours have been catalysts driving collective bargaining efforts. Pro-union workers also want a larger say in decisions impacting school management and measures of student learning. Unionized teachers with ASPIRA charter school network rally outside an ASPIRA high school to convince the company's management to come to terms on a contract on March 9, 2017, in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Scott Olson / Getty Images) Grassroots, not-for-profit news is rare -- and Truthout's very existence depends on donations from readers. Will you help us publish more stories like this one? Make a one-time or monthly donation by clicking here. Nearly 30 ...
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Imagining a New Social Order: Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin in Conversation 19.11.2017 Truthout.com
Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin discuss how the left can save the US from neoliberal excesses. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) In a time of deep political, social and economic uncertainty for everyone (except the ultra-rich), Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin provide some theoretical and practical guidance for the left. This Truthout interview is an effort to help reimagine a realistic social order in an age when the old order is dying but the new has yet to be born. Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin discuss how the left can save the US from neoliberal excesses. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) This story could not have been published without the support of readers like you. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout and fund more stories like it! We live in an age of illegitimate neoliberal hegemony and soaring political uncertainty. The evidence is all around: citizen disillusionment over mainstream political parties and the traditional conservative-liberal divide, massive inequality, ...
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Scientific Advances Can Make it Easier to Recycle Plastics 17.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Most of the 150 million tons of plastics produced around the world every year end up in landfills, the oceans and elsewhere. Less than 9 percent of plastics are recycled in the United States, rising to about 30 percent in Europe.
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Seagrass is a Key Fishing Ground Globally 17.11.2017 Environmental News Network
New research demonstrates that seagrass meadows are important fishing grounds all around the globe. The work highlights that there is an urgent need to start appreciating and understanding this role to be able to build more sustainable fisheries. A study led by Dr Lina Mtwana Nordlund at Stockholm University, published in the scientific journal Fish & Fisheries, examines the global extent to which these underwater meadows support fishing activity.
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Capitalism Is Not the Only Choice 17.11.2017 Truthout.com
Since the breakup of the Soviet bloc and China's turn toward free markets, many economists have pronounced an "end of history," where capitalism reigns supreme as the ultimate form of economy. Indeed, free markets are glorified in popular culture -- but many of us in the 99 percent are not feeling so happy or secure about this economy. Are we trapped in capitalism? (Photo: Blend Images - Hill Street Studios / Getty Images)   Ready to make a difference? Help Truthout provide a platform for exposing injustice and inspiring action. Click here to make a one-time or monthly donation. Since the breakup of the Soviet bloc and China's turn toward free markets, many economists have pronounced an "end of history," where capitalism reigns supreme as the ultimate form of economy. Perhaps "there is no alternative" to a globalized neoliberal economy, as former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher often said. Indeed, free markets in which individuals compete to get what they can while they can are glorified in ...
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Genomic Study Explores Evolution of Gentle 'Killer Bees' in Puerto Rico 16.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A genomic study of Puerto Rico's Africanized honey bees – which are more docile than other so-called “killer bees” – reveals that they retain most of the genetic traits of their African honey bee ancestors, but that a few regions of their DNA have become more like those of European honey bees. According to the researchers, these changes likely contributed to the bees' rapid evolution toward gentleness in Puerto Rico, a change that occurred within 30 years.
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Study Reveals Structure and Origins of Glacial Polish on Yosemite's Rocks 16.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The glaciers that carved Yosemite Valley left highly polished surfaces on many of the region's rock formations. These smooth, shiny surfaces, known as glacial polish, are common in the Sierra Nevada and other glaciated landscapes.
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