User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Campus
Last updated: Apr 21 2019 24:23 IST RSS 2.0
 
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20 years after the Columbine shooting, its brutality is routine 19.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Have school shootings become part of the American psyche?
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Alberta politics meets the federal NDP's 'island of calm' 15.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Penney Kome "Alberta punches way above its weight in Confederation," said Anne McGrath, "particularly in the last few years, when we've led the way with climate change plans." She should know. McGrath has served as chief of staff to Jack Layton and other federal and provincial NDP leaders, winning kudos for her strategic planning and for keeping cool under stress. She has also run for the Alberta legislature before, in 1993 and 1995, and is the current NDP candidate for Calgary-Varsity. No wonder conservative gadfly Danielle Smith -- whose scorn is a medal of honour for some progressives -- has dubbed her "the candidate I am most afraid of in this election."    British-born to Irish parents who moved to Montreal when she was five, Ann graduated from the University of Ottawa and moved to Edmonton to work as a field officer for the Alberta Federation of Students. From there, based in Calgary, she went on to be executive director for Oxfam-Canada, and to work at the Canadian Mental Health Association. In ...
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Ontario education cuts mean fewer teachers, fewer courses and fewer programs 11.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Jason Kunin The Ford government's announcement on March 15 that it would be raising average class sizes in Ontario secondary schools from 22 to 28 was a variation on an old magician's trick: distract people with one hand while you pick their pocket with the other. While the government has carefully framed the issue around the topic of class sizes, the public has been kept in the dark about the real impact of the changes coming to education. What's coming is not just larger class sizes, but the decimation of programming and the inability of schools to offer students a full range of courses -- or even all the courses they need to graduate. Unfortunately, with the Ford government introducing its budget on Thursday, by the time people realize what's coming, it will be too late. First, let's be clear that this is not just about an extra six students in every class. When we talk about average class sizes, the implication is that some classes are larger and some are smaller. With a 1:22 average ratio we already ...
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Rachel's problem 8.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Penney Kome As Thursday night's provincial party leaders' debate demonstrated, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley doesn't back down from a fight. Which is admirable. At the same time, fighting with Jason Kenney helps keep him in the spotlight, which is unfortunate and redundant, since the media are already dogging him diligently. Perhaps the premier could gain more votes by highlighting what her NDP government has achieved in four short years in office, after 44 years of Conservative rule. From raising the minimum wage to $15, to including farm workers in workers' compensation, to affirming LGBTQ+ rights, Rachel Notley's government has moved the province of Alberta a long way towards living in the 21st century. Decades of Conservative and Social Credit governments have left Alberta with a right-wing reputation. As premier, Rachel Notley comes in a direct line from the lesser-known Prairie co-operative tradition, e.g., the Calgary Co-op is the largest retail co-operative in North America. And of course, ...
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Are Mark Smith's comments on gay love a 'lake-of-fire' moment for the UCP? 4.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga With the revelation that United Conservative Party candidate Mark Smith holds the offensive view gay love can never be real love, and he equates LGBTQ people with pedophiles, it appeared that Alberta's United Conservative Party was finally having its own genuine "lake-of-fire" moment. But was it? It certainly looked like it in the aftermath of the story that broke when CJSR, a campus radio station at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, played parts of a recording of a sermon by Smith to his Baptist church in the Drayton Valley-Devon riding made before he entered politics. He was first elected as a Wildrose MLA in 2015. The reaction to Pastor Smith's sermon was harsh, including from conservative commentators whom one might have expected to be more forgiving of offensive commentary by members of the party of Jason Kenney. After all, there have been more than two dozen bozo eruptions and Kenney has forgiven many of them. But there was something different about Smith's ugly message to ...
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Will United Conservative scandals keep traction once parties start rolling out their policies? 21.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Alberta Premier Rachel Notley's NDP clearly hopes to make Opposition Leader Jason Kenney's character the ballot box issue for voters in the April 16 provincial election, but will the United Conservative Party's scandals have as much traction now that the election writ has been dropped? The risk for the NDP strategy, even if daily reminders of the UCP leader's flawed character and his party's problem with extremists continue, is that they will get lost amid the daily policy announcements both parties and their smaller rivals are bound to make during an election campaign. For a government generally perceived to be campaigning from behind its principal challenger in popular support, the campaign didn't get off to a bad start from the NDP's perspective, with near simultaneous revelations that more fines had been levied in the UCP's "Kamikaze Campaign" scandal and that a high-profile UCP candidate had been forced to quit the race after her apparent white supremacist views became known. On ...
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Student organizers report back on March 15 climate strike 20.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar Many of us supported and were heartened by students coming out on March 15 to demand that local and federal government take real steps to combat climate change. There were many great interviews and news stories which talked to kids out on the street . The Activist Toolkit, however, decided to take a different approach. I contacted all the local organizers I could find and asked them: 1. How did your local climate strike go? 2. What worked and what did not? 3. What will you be doing for the national day of action in Canada on May 3? 4. What did some of the students that participated say? 5. What are you trying to win in your communities? I am posting edited versions of the responses I received below. If you would like to connect about your experience organizing the strike in your community, please send it my way. The Activist Toolkit will continue stay in touch with organizers and continue to help support the demand for real action on climate change. The reports below are the personal ...
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Why the youth climate movement is a bright light during troubled times 19.3.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
If history is a judge, the recent climate strike by more than a million school kids bodes well for future climate progress.
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White fragility and the fight over Marin County’s Dixie School District 18.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
North of San Francisco, a well-heeled community has its privilege tested.
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The climate change generation wants to be heard 15.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
‘I’m fighting for my future.’
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Episode 163: A 'ROSI' path for calculating sustainability ROI 15.3.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Plus, thoughts on podcasts to add to your audio library of sustainability resources.
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Students in Canada prepare to strike for the climate 14.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar For decades many of us have protested, marched, and written innumerable papers (killing our fair share of trees) to say that the actions governments are taking to protect the environment are not enough. As politicians and the powerful keep watering down what is necessary to protect the environment and trying to placate opposition with weak accords, we are seeing the impacts of climate change become increasingly devasting. Young people around the world are absolutely right to ask why go to school if we may well have destroyed the planet by the time they are finished being "educated," and what good is education if no one is listening to the educated anyway. This is where the global student strikes for climate come in. Greta Thunberg started the actions in 2018 by striking in front of the Swedish parliament, eventually protesting every Friday to demand that the Swedish government reduce carbon emissions in accordance with the  Paris Agreement . The movement has grown and now, on March 15, there ...
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Students prepare to strike for the climate on March 15 14.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Students prepare to strike for the climate on March 15
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Elizabeth May talks fossil fuels, pipelines and selling out the climate in Alberta 13.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga What would have Elizabeth May have done in Rachel Notley's shoes?  The leader of the Green Party of Canada says she would have summoned up the memory of Peter Lougheed, founder of Alberta's 44-year Progressive Conservative dynasty, but not the way the province's first NDP premier has. "I think that Albertans are reasonable," May said during a short, 15-minute interview before she gave a talk with students and faculty at The King's University in Edmonton Friday. "If you present the facts, and say, 'Look, we had this plan from Peter Lougheed, let's revisit it," she argued, Albertans and other Canadians could find common ground.  Notley took a different road, with which the member of Parliament for Saanich and the Islands disagrees profoundly, describing Alberta's approach "an abdication of responsibility." To the right of Ralph Klein on oil? "If I had been her adviser, and I certainly tried to communicate this to her, given the political landscape, I would have sought out reclaiming the ...
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3 secrets for scoring an entry-level sustainability job 12.3.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Adding value, being strategic and starting early can put you ahead of the pack.
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In Santa Fe, children learn the ABCs of inequity 11.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Where students reside and where schools thrive highlights an opportunity gap in New Mexico’s capital.
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25 badass women shaking up the corporate climate movement 8.3.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
From determined diplomats to compassionate policy experts to pragmatic executives, they are role models for any gender.
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A partial list of attacks on women's rights under Doug Ford 7.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tina Beier Since June, Doug Ford's government has taken steps to systematically undermine women's rights. On their own, the funding cuts to the Ontario College of Midwives, clawbacks to raises for early childhood educators, and the reversion to the 1996 sex-ed, would not seem as insidious. But taken together, Ford's government is demonstrating it has an anti-women agenda. The most obvious attack is the cutting of funding towards the Ontario College of Midwives . On November 8, 2018, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care advised the College that the government would no longer provide it with operational grants, which encompass over one-third of the College's budget. The College is instrumental in providing midwives with patient safety training. Midwives are a predominantly women-identifying workforce, compared to other primary healthcare providers who also provide low-risk pregnancy, delivery, and post-birth care to women. In 2018, the Association of Ontario Midwives won a landmark pay equity case , ...
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Regenerative agriculture can make farmers stewards of the land again 4.3.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The "give back what you take" approach of sustatinability isn't enough.
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Sordid SNC-Lavalin affair exposes Canada as a plutocracy, not a democracy 1.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn With all the political commentators pontificating on the SNC-Lavalin affair and former governor general Wilson-Raybould's explosive testimony to the House of Commons justice committee, I wouldn't dare venture to offer my own modest opinion on the imbroglio if I didn't think I had something original to say.  To put it bluntly, I'm convinced that the eruption of this political scandal occurred because we live in a plutocracy rather than a democracy.    The Oxford dictionary defines plutocracy as "government by a wealthy elite." U.S. president Abraham Lincoln once defined democracy as "government of the people, by the people, and for the people." But, since women and people of colour were denied voting rights at that time, he was careful not to say "government of, by, and for all the people." Indeed, more than 80 years were to pass before women and people of colour were grudgingly permitted to cast their ballots -- a long delay that lasted in Canada as well as the U.S.  The freedom to vote, however, ...
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