User: flenvcenter Topic: Shelter and Housing-National
Category: Urban Planning :: Planning
Last updated: Apr 20 2018 15:31 IST RSS 2.0
 
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SB 50 could have reshaped L.A., and readers were having none of it 18.5.2019 Los Angeles Times - Living Green

Either SB 50 was the most unpopular piece of state legislation in years, or many L.A. Times letter writers live in tidy neighborhoods of historic single-family homes.

I say this because all but one of the nearly three dozen letters we received this week on SB 50, the bill in Sacramento to upend...

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To Fix Housing, We Need to Talk About Land Use: Nora Libertun and Cynthia Goytia 4.1.2019 THE CITY FIX
Affordable housing is a crisis that only seems to deepen. Some 1.2 billion people in cities lack access to affordable, secure housing – a number that’s projected to grow to 1.6 billion people by 2025. Cities in the global south, ...
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The Continuing Quest for a More Walkable Los Angeles 20.4.2018 American Prospect
screen_shot_2017-07-19_at_4.28.52_pm.png Angelenos spend unfathomable amounts of time in cars navigating traffic jams—ones that definitely don’t turn into La La Land-style dance parties . A recent study by INRIX, a transportation analytics company, found that Los Angeles residents spend 100 hours in traffic congestion, the worst in the United States. Despite L.A.’s car-centric reputation, walking and taking public transit is the norm for many Angelenos, especially people of color. According to Los Angeles Metro, the county’s transit agency, most of its passengers are African American or Latino. Social inequality is baked into the regional land use laws characterized by low-density sprawl that has contributed to car dependence. Affluent, majority-white communities concentrated in the most desirable areas are effectively walled off by “redlining,” segregated housing policies that prevented low-income people and people of color from buying homes and living in white neighborhoods. Before World War II, L.A. ...
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Why America Needs More Social Housing 16.4.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine.  Subscribe here .  The quest to provide what has come to be called “affordable housing” in America is hobbled by one fundamental reality. Too much housing is in the market sector and too little is in a social sector permanently protected from rising prices. The result is that supply and demand relentlessly bids up market prices. Government is required to provide deeper and deeper subsidies to keep rents within the bounds of incomes, so fewer and fewer people get any kind of help. This is true whether the form of public subsidy is tax breaks, direct subsidies, vouchers, or deals with developers to set aside some percent of units as affordable. In most cities, the median rent far exceeds what median incomes can afford. In cities with hot housing markets, homeownership is even further beyond reach for those who do not already own homes, exacerbating competition for scarce apartments. The idea of having a permanent sector of ...
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True Affordability: Critiquing the International Housing Affordability Survey 2.4.2018 THE CITY FIX
Unaffordability is a major problem in cities of all kinds. Many households spend far more on housing and transportation than is considered affordable, and many people who would like to live in magnet cities cannot due to these costs. Cities ...
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Protesters gathering in Sacramento to challenge Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions before his 'sanctuary state' speech 7.3.2018 LA Times: Commentary
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California's candidates for governor react to Trump administration lawsuit over immigration policy 7.3.2018 LA Times: Commentary
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California Senate leader Kevin de León: Sessions' policies are based on 'white nationalism and white supremacy' 7.3.2018 LA Times: Commentary
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Watch live: Jeff Sessions announces that Trump administration is suing California 7.3.2018 LA Times: Commentary
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After California's most destructive fire season, a debate over where to rebuild homes 16.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary

After a destructive wildfire swept from Calabasas to Malibu in 1993, the head of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy stood on a mountaintop on live TV and made a radical proposal.

He called for a “three-strikes” rule to limit the number of times recovery funds could be spent to help rebuild...

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Blatstein's Wawa proposal ignores pedestrian-friendly goals along Delaware waterfront | Inga Saffron 14.12.2017 Philly.com News
Bart Blatstein's proposal for a gas station would just perpetuate the autocentric conditions along Columbus Boulevard.
A new California gold rush for homeowners, the poor house for renters 25.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

I lived in an apartment until I was 8, when my parents scraped together a down payment and bought a modest little house on a cul-de-sac, taking hold of a deed that was our ticket to the kingdom of suburban California royalty.

Housing developments grew out of the dust all around us in eastern Contra...

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How the graying of America is stretching local tax dollars 24.10.2017 Washington Post
How the graying of America is stretching local tax dollars
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California's deadliest wildfires were decades in the making. 'We have forgotten what we need to do to prevent it' 22.10.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Historian Stephen Pyne sees no coincidence in the fact that on Oct. 8, 1542 — 475 years to the day before the wildfires began ravaging Northern California — the Spanish explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo saw smoke in the sky above Southern California.

Cabrillo’s pilot, Bartolomé Ferrelo, dutifully...

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Developers filling in Twin Cities’ open spaces 18.9.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The Twin Cities is growing in a new direction: inward, not outward. In a shift in development patterns, sprawl has been stalled and replaced by infill development on blighted, forgotten and ugly plots of land, the Pioneer Press reported . “Am I happy about this? Yes, absolutely,” said Jonathan Sage-Martinson, […]
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Let's Get Rational About Disaster Risk 16.9.2017 Wall St. Journal: Opinion
An unfortunate truth is that American influencers have one thing in common: a beach house in Florida.
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Harvey’s Poorest Victims Will Never Rebuild. They’re Getting Evicted. 15.9.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by CityLab and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Hilton Kelley has been sounding off on Facebook Live the past few days about families who evacuated their homes to escape Hurricane Harvey and are now getting eviction notices. The families live in Port Arthur, Texas, the small Gulf Coast city […]
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‘Cheap’ Houston housing, at a price 6.9.2017 Seattle Times: Opinion

Harvey was Houston’s third 500-year flood in three years. Something’s happening up there, ya think?
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Harvey should be the turning point in fighting climate change 30.8.2017 Washington Post
Harvey should be the turning point in fighting climate change
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New Transited-Oriented Development Policy Has Big Implications for India’s Cities 23.8.2017 THE CITY FIX
India’s burgeoning cities are famous the world over for their startling vibrancy – and, sometimes, their startling problems. A new national policy, enshrining more transit-friendly development principles, aims to steer urban planning in the world’s largest democracy towards more compact ...
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