User: flenvcenter Topic: Shelter and Housing-National
Category: Affordable Housing
Last updated: Sep 25 2020 05:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 13,060    
Drive-thru flu shots? Vaccine vouchers? How getting the flu shot in Illinois will be different this year 25.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Business
Getting the flu shot this year is going to look different in Illinois as patients and medical facilities adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Also found in: [+]
Californians moved to Oregon for affordable housing. Wildfires left them homeless 21.9.2020 L.A. Times - World News

Oregon wildfires leave California transplants homeless and facing rising housing costs.

Also found in: [+]
Food box deliveries to needy California seniors cut off because of USDA cheese rule 11.9.2020 LA Times: Health

As coronavirus cases soared, thousands of low-income seniors stopped receiving free food boxes because of a rule designed to help the dairy industry.

Also found in: [+]
Chicago aldermen approve Obama Presidential Center affordable housing plan 10.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
The City Council on Wednesday approved a package aimed at protecting affordable housing in the South Side neighborhood around the location of the proposed Obama Presidential Center.
Also found in: [+]
The Moratorium on Evictions Can’t Fix the Disastrous Housing Crisis 4.9.2020 Mother Jones
The tenants’ rights lawyers at Lone Star Legal Aid in Houston—who represent low income clients across 72 Texas counties and four counties in Arkansas—referred to August 25 as “doomsday.” It marked the end of the 30-day grace period following the July 25 expiration of tenant protections in effect under the CARES Act—the catch-all spending bill […]
Also found in: [+]
Affordable housing loan program aims to boost Chicago’s South and West sides 3.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Mayor Lori Lightfoot is set to join an affordable housing lender on Thursday to announce a big loan program designed to improve the city’s stock of inexpensive apartments. The Community Investment Corporation’s launch of its $330 million, five-year loan pool for private landlords to renovate or purchase units comes as the mayor seeks to gain traction for her own ambitious “Invest South/West” commercial program designed to improve struggling neighborhood shopping districts on the South and West sides using city money to jump-start private investment.
Also found in: [+]
City Council package aimed at preserving affordable housing near site of Obama Presidential Center advances 26.8.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
A plan advanced Wednesday to try to help lower-income residents keep their homes in the Woodlawn neighborhood near the site of the proposed Obama Presidential Center by helping tenants to organize themselves to try to purchase multiunit buildings and setting aside funds for tenants to repair their homes.
Also found in: [+]
A California bill would allow a duplex on most single-family parcels 26.8.2020 LA Times: Business

The proposed legislation to end single-family zoning is pitched as a way to ease a long-running housing shortage

Also found in: [+]
California has a housing crisis. A bill would allow a duplex on most single-family parcels 26.8.2020 LA Times: Business

California bill would end single-family zoning by allowing duplexes on single family parcels.

Also found in: [+]
Editorial: Tired of pay-to-play corruption? Take L.A. politicians out of development decisions 24.8.2020 LA Times: Opinion

Want to reduce the risk of political corruption in Los Angeles development decisions? Take the politicians out of the process.

Also found in: [+]
No deal yet in Sacramento to help struggling California renters 21.8.2020 LA Times: Health

Facing extraordinary circumstances because of the COVID-19 pandemic and a looming deadline for legislative action, California lawmakers on Thursday reduced the number of bills moving forward that deal with the state's affordable housing crisis.

Also found in: [+]
‘It’s always a scary thing’: More than 175,000 Illinois residents may have recently lost health insurance 21.8.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Across Chicago and the country, many people have added a new concern on to their ever-growing list of worries during the pandemic: a lack of health insurance. It is forcing families to make some hard choices.
Also found in: [+]
Editorial: Now Trump is pandering to NIMBYs. Sad! 18.8.2020 LA Times: Opinion

The latest about-face on affordable housing in the suburbs from Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson is so cynical.

Also found in: [+]
About 6 months in, will the COVID-19 pandemic change Americans’ views of the social safety net? 13.8.2020 Chicago Tribune: Business
"Never did I think I would need government help."
Also found in: [+]
America’s Rich Used to Move Around More Than the Poor. When COVID Landed, That Flipped. 8.8.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Wired and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Now more than ever in the US, your money defines you. If you’re rich, you’ve splurged on enough canned food and TP to ride out several pandemics, let alone COVID-19. As the start of the school year approaches, perhaps […]
Also found in: [+]
A Fairer and More Sustainable Post-COVID World in Latin America 6.8.2020 THE CITY FIX
The large cities in the Latin American region all have one thing in common: the opportunities for employment and income are concentrated in a few districts while, more and more, sprawling housing zones are located on the outskirts of cities ...
Also found in: [+]
New local campaigns can bring cheaper and cleaner rooftop solar to communities of color 6.8.2020 GreenBiz.com
New local campaigns can bring cheaper and cleaner rooftop solar to communities of color Lacey Shaver Thu, 08/06/2020 - 00:20 There is a new urgency across the United States to address structural and systemic racial inequities in criminal justice , wealth and housing , employment , health care and education . These disparities are also pervasive in energy. One common measure of this is "energy burden," or the share of take-home income spent on energy bills. Communities of color have been shown to have a 24–27 percent higher energy burden than White Americans when controlling across income levels, and low-income residents experience an energy burden up to three times higher than high-income residents. Rooftop solar has the potential to reduce energy burden in communities of color, but it has not yet lived up to its potential due to systemic barriers: lack of solar education and outreach; financial challenges such as lower income and access to credit; and issues related to home ownership, such as lower ...
Also found in: [+]
A Fairer and More Sustainable Post-COVID World in Latin America 6.8.2020 WRI Stories
A Fairer and More Sustainable Post-COVID World in Latin America Comments|Add Comment|PrintThe coronavirus recovery is a chance for Latin America's cities to become more equitable. Photo by Mariana Gil/WRI. This blog post originally appeared in the C40 Knowledge Hub. The large cities in the Latin American region all have one thing in common: the opportunities for employment and income are concentrated in a few districts while, more and more, sprawling housing zones are located on the outskirts... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Also found in: [+]
As COVID-19 keeps university fall plans in doubt, community colleges see boost as affordable option closer to home 5.8.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Community college enrollment surged after the Great Recession. Will the pandemic spur a similar boost?
Also found in: [+]
The digital divide worsens the inequitable impacts of the climate crisis 3.8.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
The digital divide worsens the inequitable impacts of the climate crisis Maddie Stone Mon, 08/03/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in Grist and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. One of the starkest inequalities exposed by the coronavirus pandemic is the difference between the digital haves and have-nots. Those with a fast internet connection are more able to work and learn remotely, stay in touch with loved ones and access critical services such as telemedicine. For the millions of Americans who live in an internet dead zone , fully participating in society in the age of social distancing has become difficult, if not impossible. But if the pandemic has laid bare America’s so-called "digital divide," climate change will only worsen the inequality that stems from it. As the weather grows more extreme and unpredictable, wealthy urban communities with faster, more reliable internet access will have ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 13,060