User: flenvcenter Topic: Shelter and Housing-Independent
Category: Urban Planning :: Traditional Neighborhood Design
Last updated: Oct 12 2017 17:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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5 ways multi-use trail systems transform communities 21.5.2019 GreenBiz.com
Multi-use trails are an infrastructure asset for cities and communities — why aren't we prioritizing them?
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Should you pay employees to ditch their car commute? 12.10.2017 GreenBiz.com
RMI offers employees cash in lieu of parking, either to put toward an alternate commute or as a reward for not driving. The reward? It's good for business.
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A green Aggresivhaus proposed for Hamburg 25.5.2017 TreeHugger
A WWII bunker will get a green mountain built on top
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Celebration, Florida may be destroyed in order to save it 20.3.2017 TreeHugger
The fire department demands trees and on-street parking be removed so that they can have 20' clear speedways
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How Zillow's Trick or Treat index gets it wrong 31.10.2016 TreeHugger
It focuses on dollars instead of density.
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Duany: The Promise of Suburbia Has Been Betrayed 29.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The transect / PlaceMakers "The promise of suburbia -- to live in nature amid the easy flow of cars -- has been betrayed. Sprawl is not sustainable; its growth chokes on itself," argued architect and urban planner Andrés Duany at the Congress for New Urbanism in Detroit. Duany calls for using New Urbanism , an approach he and others have promoted for the past few decades, in order to "preserve nature." New Urbanist developments can preserve nature because they can "make cities places people love to live in," so they stop moving to the suburbs, contributing to sprawl. New Urbanist communities, he argues, are also inherently healthy and just, because there people "walk, so they don't get fat," and "you don't need a car to get around." In contrast, car-based communities are "un-just," because the old can't drive cars and the poor can't afford them. Some 50 million Americans don't have cars. New Urbanism can also result in a more balanced relationship with nature. "In Europe, they had to integrate with ...
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Minimalist multi-use unit creates more intimate studio apartment in Sydney 26.7.2016 TreeHugger
With everything happening in one space, studio apartments can often feel too cluttered. This Sydney apartments gets a space makeover with the addition of a clever multifunctional unit that partitions the space and stores things out of sight.
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Celebrating Jane Jacobs' Birthday 'round the net 4.5.2016 TreeHugger
There is some wonderful stuff to read and remember.
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Celebrating Jane Jacobs' Centennial 4.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Post-World War America was defined by an auto and housing boom that fueled the suburbanization of America. New development and freeways were "in" and historic buildings and blighted neighborhoods were bulldozed to make way for them. Communities were "redeveloped" without community input and often left with soulless structures divorced from the community around it. In 1961, Jane Jacobs wrote The Death and Life of Great American Citie s, which, as its opening sentence explains, is an "attack on current city planning and rebuilding practices". Jacobs saw cities as living organisms that required mixed use to thrive and criticized developments and freeways that isolated communities from the activity around it. She explained, Whenever and wherever societies have flourished and prospered rather than stagnated and decayed, creative and workable cities have been at the core of the phenomenon. Decaying cities, declining economies, and mounting social troubles travel together. The combination is not ...
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Balancing the Scales of City Sustainability 2.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I spend virtually all my professional time thinking about the intersection of human settlement and environmental sustainability. I am particularly interested in the built environment of American cities, towns, and suburbs - what I like to call our "people habitat" - and how it relates to the natural world. How can we make these two realms - people habitat and natural habitat - more harmonious? These issues are acutely on my mind today because I am preparing a talk I have been invited to deliver early next month on "Urbanism and Sustainability." (For those who are interested, it will be at the annual meeting of the Congress for the New Urbanism, in Detroit, at 10.15 am on June 8 .) The scales of urban sustainability I suppose I should start by defining what I mean by "environmental sustainability." I generally use the phrase in its colloquial sense, to mean environmental health. More formally, most scholars start with the definition of sustainable development in the international treatise Our Common ...
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We Want More Walkable Neighborhoods - but Can Our Communities Deliver? 30.11.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"The most requested neighborhood characteristic of all buyers is walkability," real estate broker Andrea Evers recently told a reporter for The Washington Post. But, in an article written by the Post's Michele Lerner , Evers went on to say that "very few areas" in the greater DC market meet the desired criterion, particularly if the prospective buyer wants to be within walking distance of a Metro transit station. And that, in a nutshell, is the good and bad news of walkability. Let's elaborate on the good part: More and more of us want to be within safe and comfortable walking distance of the destinations that meet our everyday needs, such as shops, places to eat, services, parks, and good transportation options that can take us downtown and to jobs and other places we want to go. It's the hottest trend in real estate, sought by buyers and renters alike. The demand is increasing In fact, demand for walkable neighborhoods is only going to increase, as more and more members of the millennial generation, ...
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Get more candy on Hallowe'en with New Urbanism 30.10.2015 TreeHugger
Forget the Walkscore, You want to live in a community with a high Candy Density.
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So what ever happened to Katrina Cottages? 14.8.2015 TreeHugger
I wrote at the time that "We are on the cusp of a revolution." Boy, did I get that one wrong.
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The Environmental Impacts of Land Development Depend Largely on Where We Put It 11.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There's a trendy meme emerging in progressive city planning circles to the effect that whether land development is harmful "sprawl" or benign "urbanism" is a matter not of location but of design. I recently saw a tweet expressing this sentiment, written by an influential city planner and picked up quickly by other urban designers. Not long after, I saw a Facebook post along the same lines: "It isn't where, but what that makes a place urban or suburban." This rings true in some situations: bad neighborhood design can certainly turn an otherwise well-positioned development into the equivalent of sprawl; and there are pockets of what are essentially urban neighborhoods in, say, suburban downtowns. But our nomenclature gets tricky when applied to new development located on or beyond the fringe of metropolitan areas. Outlying newer developments are typically built on what was formerly farmland or forests, sometimes "leapfrogging" over available closer-in sites to do so. Those are classic characteristics of ...
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As Cities Evolve, 'Access' is About More Than Cars 22.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Questions and answers about accessing cities and neighborhoods once spoke the language of exit ramps, street widening and parking adequacy. Now, different conversations, and varied imagery, create diverse story lines, where urban policy and citizen activism converge. Photographs are one tool to illustrate the diverse meanings and examples of "access" to urban settings today. Access now means many things---depending on context---including transportation modes; sustainability and the shared economy; public safety and particular approaches to community participation; and aspects of social equity. The following photographs address a small cross-section of access examples. I have chosen to focus on my home city---Seattle---rather than a showcase of national and international illustrations. Even with only four photographs, a single-city focus shows a sampling of access challenges and solutions within one geographic area. The Streetcar Mode Makes Neighborhood The Lake Union Streetcar has evolved from a low-use ...
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How to Make Smart Growth More Lovable and Sustainable 29.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
While on my way to a dental appointment last week -- not my favorite activity, truth be told -- I had the distinct pleasure of walking through Georgetown, Washington's oldest neighborhood and one of its most lovely. As I ambled through the historic, tree-lined streets, I was reminded of how our older neighborhoods so often embody the characteristics that we now ascribe to "smart growth." In particular, Georgetown has a walkable urban density; well-connected streets and sidewalks that make it notably pedestrian-friendly; a central, convenient location just a mile or so from the heart of downtown; good transit service; many shops, restaurants and civic amenities mixed in with, or a ridiculously easy walk from, the neighborhood's homes. These attributes are the essence of what those of us who advocate smart growth advocate for. And, while Georgetown's historic district is the one closest to my home, DC certainly has other lovely old neighborhoods with similar features, and so, actually, do most cities in ...
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How can we get more people on to bikes? 12.6.2015 TreeHugger
Here are a few ideas that might work.
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The Future of America's Cities Lies in the Past 7.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW YORK -- Take America's oldest cities, look ahead a decade and catch a glimpse of our urban past. You won't find horse-drawn carriages, steam trains or gas lamps, but you might well find the kinds of urban centers that once drew waves of immigrants: tightly settled, integrated communities with busy streets, active local commerce and small manufacturing industries. A decade from now, the hearts of some of our largest cities will no longer be defined by gleaming skyscrapers surrounded by well-manicured corporate plazas. These trophy buildings, and the broad avenues that flank them, will still exist -- but as a secondary part of what draws people to live in a city. The pulse of our metropolitan cores will be found in places where people live, work and play -- mixed-use communities whose combination of old and new buildings, green space and tarmac will redefine life in the central city. Many of the world's global cities are well on their way to this future -- Paris, London and Berlin to name a few. So, ...
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Could Placemaking Become the New Golf? Repurposing Obsolete Courses 16.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
You wouldn't necessarily notice, not unless you've had a particular reason to be paying attention, but the US has way more golf courses than the industry and its enthusiasts can support. Once-flourishing fairways, greens, and clubhouses are being decommissioned all over the place, leaving communities with empty land, sometimes contaminated from years of intensive chemical applications designed to maintain greens and fairways in an artificially pristine condition. Adding insult to injury, in many cases these vacant sites are now attracting illegal dumping and crime. Something needs to change. Can this surplus land be repurposed in a way that helps give our suburbs a stronger sense of place, that contributes nonsprawling infill development and, at the same time, better-ordered public green space and ecological services? A few signs are starting to point in that direction. The decline of golf and surplus courses My first introduction to the subject was a paper written in 2013 for a seminar on law and policy ...
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Remembering the Human Scale in Walkable City Neighborhoods 6.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
  Have you ever noticed how those of us who promote walkable, “smart growth” city neighborhoods often choose historic districts to illustrate what we advocate?  Take the photo at the top of this article, for example:  I’m not sure what city it is from, but it clearly is a historic neighborhood.  It was chosen by the advocacy group Smart Growth America to illustrate the group’s recent tweet “Healthy, diverse smart growth neighborhoods attract talent, commerce, and investment.” When they look like that, they certainly do.  A highly detailed study published earlier this year (and reported here ) by the National Trust for Historic Preservation demonstrated that, compared to districts dominated by larger, newer buildings, those with smaller and older buildings were found to score better on multiple measures of urban vitality. Below is another example of an older neighborhood being used to illustrate smart growth principles.  It’s a classic “Main Street” from Rochester, Michigan, and it appears at the top of ...
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