User: flenvcenter Topic: Shelter and Housing-Independent
Category: Urban Planning :: Planning
Last updated: Jan 17 2018 01:25 IST RSS 2.0
 
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On the outskirts of Missoula, growth comes with challenges 16.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
An influx of new people to nearby communities has strained town systems.
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'Living Tiny Legally': Part 2 of informative tiny house docu-series is out (Video) 11.5.2017 TreeHugger
The second part of this educational series is out, offering a behind-the-scenes look at how current codes are being updated to include tiny houses.
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How to fix exclusive resort towns 30.11.2016 Writers on the Range
It’s time to rethink urbanization in mountain communities.
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A 90 second lesson in how parking can kill cities 8.9.2016 TreeHugger
The City of Ottawa's cute and cogent explanation of why they wanted to lower their parking standards is relevant anywhere.
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Modern Megacity, Meet Ancient Wisdom 15.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"City limits have become limitless cities," proclaims a Prudential advertisement appearing in many airports. Jakarta, São Paolo, and Shanghai all have metropolitan area populations of more than 30 million people ; Tokyo approaches 40 million. Prudential seems to have a good point. The modern Holy Land now contains three large urban strips. One stretches from south of Bethlehem, through Jerusalem, and north to Ramallah. It spans 30 miles and includes about one million people. The Gaza Strip is the second urban belt, with about 1.8 million inhabitants. The third is the greater Tel Aviv metropolitan area, with about two million inhabitants. While these figures pale in comparison to other cities in the world, for those living in any urban belt, easy access to nature is a pressing challenge. Currently, the majority of the people in the world live in cities, and as mass migration from rural areas to cities continues, this challenge will only become more pronounced. This is where millennia-old religious ...
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Tiny Techtonics timber urban infill wins Passivhaus Trust Award 12.7.2016 TreeHugger
This just pushes every TreeHugger button.
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Balancing the Scales of City Sustainability 2.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I spend virtually all my professional time thinking about the intersection of human settlement and environmental sustainability. I am particularly interested in the built environment of American cities, towns, and suburbs - what I like to call our "people habitat" - and how it relates to the natural world. How can we make these two realms - people habitat and natural habitat - more harmonious? These issues are acutely on my mind today because I am preparing a talk I have been invited to deliver early next month on "Urbanism and Sustainability." (For those who are interested, it will be at the annual meeting of the Congress for the New Urbanism, in Detroit, at 10.15 am on June 8 .) The scales of urban sustainability I suppose I should start by defining what I mean by "environmental sustainability." I generally use the phrase in its colloquial sense, to mean environmental health. More formally, most scholars start with the definition of sustainable development in the international treatise Our Common ...
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Inside the Fight to Frack Pennsylvania Township 4.3.2016 Truthout.com
Penn Township hosts a mix of cookie-cutter single family homes in subdivisions and sprawling farms - some of which have been in families for generations. You can get away from city lights out here. Find a nice home and good school districts among picturesque rural scenery. But not for long. Gene Meyers points toward one of Apex Energy's proposed well sites from a hill by his home near Dutch Hollow Road in Penn Township. (Photo by Connor Mulvaney / PublicSource) Editor's note: This is the first story in our Clearing the Air series about shale gas drilling in Penn Township. PublicSource has followed the events there since April 2015. We placed air quality sensors at five homes to monitor pollutants near the contested well pad for two months. The data collected are being analyzed. PublicSource will share the results with residents and report on what we found. Sign up for our newsletter to ensure you receive our next story. Gene Meyers asked everyone to join him in prayer a few minutes before the Feb. 11 ...
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Finally! Tiny home subdivisions and developments are becoming a reality. 21.12.2015 TreeHugger
Another good reason to move to Colorado.
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We Want More Walkable Neighborhoods - but Can Our Communities Deliver? 30.11.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"The most requested neighborhood characteristic of all buyers is walkability," real estate broker Andrea Evers recently told a reporter for The Washington Post. But, in an article written by the Post's Michele Lerner , Evers went on to say that "very few areas" in the greater DC market meet the desired criterion, particularly if the prospective buyer wants to be within walking distance of a Metro transit station. And that, in a nutshell, is the good and bad news of walkability. Let's elaborate on the good part: More and more of us want to be within safe and comfortable walking distance of the destinations that meet our everyday needs, such as shops, places to eat, services, parks, and good transportation options that can take us downtown and to jobs and other places we want to go. It's the hottest trend in real estate, sought by buyers and renters alike. The demand is increasing In fact, demand for walkable neighborhoods is only going to increase, as more and more members of the millennial generation, ...
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This City Is Fining Black Residents For Having Weeds In Their Gardens 13.11.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
PAGEDALE, Mo. (CN) - Missouri resident Valarie Whitner lives in fear, but not of violence - fear of another ticket for chipped paint on a downspout, or for not having a screen on her back door. Such is life in Pagedale, a tiny municipality barely more than a mile long in north St. Louis County. But if the federal lawsuit filed last week by Whitner and fellow Pagedale residents is successful, that could change not only in Pagedale, but for tens of thousands of people living in cash-strapped municipalities throughout north St. Louis County. Whitner and co-plaintiff Vincent Blount say they have been fined a total of $2,800 for ordinance violations in their Pagedale home. They were ticketed for having chipping paint on a downspout, for not having a screen door on the back door, and for having weeds in their vegetable garden. The lawsuit claims that the number of non-traffic municipal fines issued by Pagedale has increased by nearly 500 percent in the past five years. Pagedale's population of 3,307 is 93 ...
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Donald Trump on Jeb Bush and Florida's Financial Crash: Mostly Right And Here Is Why 23.9.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
It has been seven years since Bush left office in the nation's third most populous state, but for many in Florida, Bush's two terms as governor were unforgettable. Bush came to the Governor's Mansion in 1998; a man on a mission. He was short-tempered, brittle and did not tolerate dissent inside his circle. Today, as a contender to be the GOP nominee for president in 2016, Jeb Bush offers an image that is not so different from the "compassionate conservative" he portrayed himself to be to Florida voters. Today, it is about restoring the "Big Tent" and inclusiveness. But based on his record as governor, Bush was not "compassionate" as a conservative; he was narrow-minded, could be vindictive, and was eager to deploy divide and conquer tactics. On the campaign trail now, former Governor Bush is trying to rebrand himself, but he can't run out from under his record in Florida. What Jeb Bush claims as achievements has most been taken at face value, at least until recently when Donald Trump found a way to peel ...
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The Environmental Impacts of Land Development Depend Largely on Where We Put It 11.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There's a trendy meme emerging in progressive city planning circles to the effect that whether land development is harmful "sprawl" or benign "urbanism" is a matter not of location but of design. I recently saw a tweet expressing this sentiment, written by an influential city planner and picked up quickly by other urban designers. Not long after, I saw a Facebook post along the same lines: "It isn't where, but what that makes a place urban or suburban." This rings true in some situations: bad neighborhood design can certainly turn an otherwise well-positioned development into the equivalent of sprawl; and there are pockets of what are essentially urban neighborhoods in, say, suburban downtowns. But our nomenclature gets tricky when applied to new development located on or beyond the fringe of metropolitan areas. Outlying newer developments are typically built on what was formerly farmland or forests, sometimes "leapfrogging" over available closer-in sites to do so. Those are classic characteristics of ...
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How to Make Smart Growth More Lovable and Sustainable 29.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
While on my way to a dental appointment last week -- not my favorite activity, truth be told -- I had the distinct pleasure of walking through Georgetown, Washington's oldest neighborhood and one of its most lovely. As I ambled through the historic, tree-lined streets, I was reminded of how our older neighborhoods so often embody the characteristics that we now ascribe to "smart growth." In particular, Georgetown has a walkable urban density; well-connected streets and sidewalks that make it notably pedestrian-friendly; a central, convenient location just a mile or so from the heart of downtown; good transit service; many shops, restaurants and civic amenities mixed in with, or a ridiculously easy walk from, the neighborhood's homes. These attributes are the essence of what those of us who advocate smart growth advocate for. And, while Georgetown's historic district is the one closest to my home, DC certainly has other lovely old neighborhoods with similar features, and so, actually, do most cities in ...
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Good things are growing in Ontario's greenbelt 20.5.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

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Good things are growing in Ontario’s greenbelt 20.5.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
More than half the planet’s people now live in urban areas. The need to supply food, shelter, fresh water and energy to billions of urban residents is resulting in loss of farmland, forests, wetlands and other ecosystems, as well as the critical ecological services they support, like providing food, clean air and drinking ...
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Could Placemaking Become the New Golf? Repurposing Obsolete Courses 16.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
You wouldn't necessarily notice, not unless you've had a particular reason to be paying attention, but the US has way more golf courses than the industry and its enthusiasts can support. Once-flourishing fairways, greens, and clubhouses are being decommissioned all over the place, leaving communities with empty land, sometimes contaminated from years of intensive chemical applications designed to maintain greens and fairways in an artificially pristine condition. Adding insult to injury, in many cases these vacant sites are now attracting illegal dumping and crime. Something needs to change. Can this surplus land be repurposed in a way that helps give our suburbs a stronger sense of place, that contributes nonsprawling infill development and, at the same time, better-ordered public green space and ecological services? A few signs are starting to point in that direction. The decline of golf and surplus courses My first introduction to the subject was a paper written in 2013 for a seminar on law and policy ...
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I Wish I Was in Dixie? Culture, Planning and the Future of the Southern "Boom" 9.3.2015 Truthout - All Articles
In addressing the growth of sprawling, low-density, autocentric communities around much of America, Joel Kotkin, a 'New Suburbanist,' states the case for a new outlook: Rather than reject such cities, we are committed to their improvement. All of our analysis of current and likely future trends reveals that sprawling multipolar cities with overwhelmingly auto dependent suburbs will continue to enjoy economic and demographic growth over the next several decades. [ 1 ] Despite what many New Urbanists might want to believe, Kotkin - though a sprawl apologist - is likely correct. Polycentric cities will continue to grow, and they will continue to attract new residents-for now. Much of that growth will occur in the South, now the most populous region in the United States. Ultimately, however, this is an unsustainable trend. Attempting to sustain it will have enormous portends for one of the most complicated and ecologically fragile areas of the country. The American South, long a sparsely populated region ...
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The downside of densification 2.3.2015 Current Issue
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Let’s talk about the “Z” word 4.2.2015 Writers on the Range
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