User: flenvcenter Topic: Shelter and Housing-Independent
Category: Homelessness
Last updated: Aug 13 2020 19:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Five things to know about the 2018 Alberta budget 27.3.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Nick Falvo On March 22, the NDP government of Rachel Notley tabled the 2018 Alberta budget. The official name of this year's budget is Budget 2018: A recovery built to last. I’ve written a blog post discussing some of the major "take aways" from the standpoint of Calgary’s homeless-serving sector (where I work). Here are five things to know: 1. This was largely a status quo budget. Total estimated provincial revenue for 2018-19 is $47.9 billion, compared with $46.9 billion in 2017-18. Meanwhile, total estimated provincial expenses for 2018-19 are $56.2 billion, compared with $55.9 billion in 2017-18. Ergo: no major changes in fiscal policy are in store for the year ahead. 2. Alberta is still the lowest-taxed province in Canada. According to the provincial government, if Alberta had the same tax rates as the next lowest-taxed jurisdiction (British Columbia) it would generate $11.2 billion annually in additional revenue. The claim is therefore made that Alberta has a "tax advantage" of at least $11.2 ...
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Homelessness and employment: The case of Calgary 20.3.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Nick Falvo 1. In Calgary, there aren't enough jobs to go around, and income support programs for those without work are inadequate. According to the most recent Labour Force Survey , there are almost 173,000 adults in Alberta actively searching for work -- this figure doesn’t include the many discouraged workers in Alberta who’ve given up looking for employment (in spite of this, 15 per cent of persons experiencing homelessness in Alberta do report some income from employment). While some unemployed people qualify for Employment Insurance (EI), most don't. And for those who do qualify, benefits are both modest and temporary. Unemployed people who don't qualify for EI can always apply for social assistance, but these benefits are even more modest (for an overview of social assistance throughout Canada, see this blog post ; and for an overview on social assistance in Alberta specifically, see this blog post ).                                                                      2. For persons experiencing ...
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Why Homelessness Is Harder for Women 17.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. The myth that laziness is the direct cause of homelessness is not only insulting, but it also perpetuates people's ignorance of the real problems associated with being homeless, and further isolates people who find themselves in that situation. Outsiders are much less likely to be kind or even empathize with homeless people when they can just "blame the victim" without knowing their story. The fact is, a lack of work motivation is rarely the cause of homelessness. The true culprits: Unforeseeable life circumstances, mental illness and trauma. There are many misconceptions about homelessness. For starters, there is no such thing as "a homeless person," as this implies that someone is permanently homeless, and equates their status with the person's being. In fact, homeless doesn't refer to a type of person but, rather, to an unfortunate and usually unpredictable event in some people's lives. Homelessness is ...
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Crowded Shelters and the Vicious Flu Brew Perfect Storm for the Homeless 13.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout refuses corporate funding and all the strings that come attached. Instead, reader support powers us. Make a tax-deductible donation today! The flu descended on Connie Gabaldon like a fog, she recalled, clouding her mind and compromising her judgment. It progressed to chest and back pain, the aches perhaps made worse by a fall the 66-year-old had while riding the bus in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Gabaldon is homeless. When she went to the emergency room in late January, doctors told her she also had pneumonia, a sinus infection and the flu. For the general population, the flu represents a serious health concern. But for the homeless -- who deal with higher rates of chronic illness, fewer resources and crowded conditions in shelters -- catching the flu can be a matter of life or death. This year, the nation has experienced a vicious flu season on track to break recent records, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although the outbreak has shown signs of decline over the past two ...
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Huge Organizing Effort, "40 Days of Action" Launching to Fight Poverty 7.3.2018 Truthout.com
The Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, along with Rev. Dr. William Barber II, has recently launched Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. The challenge in bringing back this campaign, which has its roots in Civil Rights activism, is enormous as 2016 Census data shows 43.1 million Americans are in poverty and want. In this interview, Theoharis discusses the campaign and the upcoming 40 Days of Action that will begin on Mother's Day.  Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis. (Photo: NESRI ) The Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, co-chair of the recently launched  Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival , grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, one of three kids in a family she describes as deeply committed to improving life for the excluded and marginalized.   South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu and other peace and anti-apartheid activists were frequent guests in her home, and even as a child, Theoharis understood that religious faith -- in her case, Presbyterian -- had to be linked to social justice. This ...
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Five things to know about the 2018 federal budget and housing 6.3.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Nick Falvo The 2018 federal budget, while not as transformative as last year's, had important new initiatives related to housing and homelessness. Here are five things to know: 1. New housing investments were announced for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people. Specifically, the budget announced $600 million over three years for on-reserve housing; $400 million over 10 years for housing in the Inuit regions of Nunavik, Nunatsiavut, and Inuvialuit; and $500 million over 10 years for housing for Métis people. In each case, this targeting funding is intended to accompany the respective federal housing strategies for each group, none of which have been released. From an urban perspective -- it's important to remember that, while Indigenous peoples make up just three per cent of Calgary's general population, they make up 20 per cent of Calgary's homeless population. Several other funding announcements were made for Indigenous peoples, valued at $5 billion over five years. This includes funding for child ...
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A tale of two housing crises, rural and urban 5.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
How one Indigenous family is navigating two very different housing problems.
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Marginalized and houseless in the West 5.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
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For Homeless Youth, Statistics and Reality Are Miles Apart 28.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
This article was originally published by TalkPoverty.org. At the headquarters of Covenant House Washington in Southeast DC, a nonprofit serving youth experiencing homelessness, ten twin-sized black canvas cots fill a white-tiled alcove on the main floor. The space serves as an emergency shelter for homeless young people, which Covenant House calls "The Sanctuary." In keeping with its name, the walls are a deep, soothing blue. Five of the cots are for women and five for men, which is far short of the demand. The room is empty now, in mid-afternoon, but by 6:00 p.m., when the shelter opens, young people will be lining up for a chance to snag a few square feet of space for the evening, and maybe a shower and a hot meal. "We turn away at least 8 youth per night," says Madye Henson, Covenant House Washington's chief executive officer. Henson has added extra beds for hypothermia season and is planning a permanent expansion to 20 beds this year. In combination with its other programs, that would bring Covenant ...
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Super Bowl LII Impacts Hospital Access and Homeless Community in Minnesota 24.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
No ads, no subscription fees -- instead, Truthout is fueled by generous donations from readers. Want to support our work? Click here to donate. While the Minnesota Vikings weren't this year's NFC champions, the city of Minneapolis -- and the surrounding area – is already feeling the impact of Super Bowl LII. And as always, the poor stand to experience the most harm. Although the big game is more than a week away, streets surrounding the brand new US Bank Stadium are closed, forcing those who live and work downtown to find alternative routes. That adds extra drive time for everyone, but the road closure makes it especially difficult for patients to reach Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC), the biggest hospital in Minnesota -- and the one that sees the most uninsured and patients in poverty. Meanwhile, HCMC is already expecting a 10 percent increase in visits in the week leading up to and including the massive event. "With the hospital right across the street from US Bank Stadium, road closures and ...
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What Happens When Wall Street Becomes Your Landlord? 23.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Private equity firms are turning the dream of home ownership into a nightmare for renters. These companies are among the beneficiaries of the 2008 housing market collapse. In the wake of the financial crisis, Wall Street firms swooped into neighborhoods to buy up houses, crowding out the families and local landlords who couldn't compete with their cash payments. Where do you turn for news and analysis you can rely on? If the answer is Truthout, then please support our mission by making a tax-deductible donation! When José Rivera moved into his house, he thought he was on the path to home ownership. But after several years and more than $90,000 in rent, he can't even get his landlord to fix the broken pipe that leaked raw sewage into his home.  Rivera's landlord is Colony Starwood Homes, a rental giant backed by Wall Street investment firms. When he first told the company about his leaky pipe, they cleaned the carpet, but left the sewage issue alone. When the pipe leaked again, Rivera filed another ...
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Time to do something about Toronto's homeless-shelters mess 22.1.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Time to do something about Toronto's homeless-shelters mess
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"Do Kids Die, Mom?" Facing the Future With Trepidation in the Age of Trump 8.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
An activist holds a child during the Science March on April 22, 2017, in Washingdon, DC. (Photo: Geoff Livingston ) As a mother and an activist, here's what I've concluded as 2018 begins: it's getting harder and harder to think about the future -- at least in that soaring Whitney Houston fashion. You know the song: "I believe the children are our future, teach them well and let them lead the way..." These days, doesn't it sound quaint and of another age? The truth is I get breathless and sweaty thinking about what life will be like for my kids -- three-year-old Madeline, five-year-old Seamus, and 11-year-old Rosena. I can't stop thinking about it either. I can't stop thinking that they won't be guaranteed clean air or clean water , that they won't have a real healthcare system to support them in bad times, even if they pay through the nose in super high taxes . They may not have functional infrastructure , even if President Trump succeeds in building a yuge gilded wall on our southern border (and who ...
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"Bussed Out": How Cities Are Giving Thousands of Homeless People One-Way Bus Tickets to Leave Town 28.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles

A major new investigation by the Guardian examined how cities are struggling to solve the problem of homelessness throughout the year, and found many have come to rely on an old solution: a one-way ticket out of town. Relocation programs that offer homeless people free bus tickets to move elsewhere have been around for at least three decades. But as the homeless population rises for the first time since the Great Recession, relocation programs are becoming more common and are expanding to more cities. We speak with the Guardian's homelessness editor, Alastair Gee, about many people who were bused out, remained homeless and eventually returned to the city they had left.

Please check back later for full transcript.

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The shame of Toronto's homelessness crisis 21.12.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
The shame of Toronto's homelessness crisis
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Crime-fighting robot retired after launching alleged - war on the homeless' 17.12.2017 Science / Technology News

Like so many classic Western anti-heroes before him, he rolled into town with a singular goal in mind: cleaning up the streets, which had become a gritty hotbed of harassment, vandalism, break-ins and grift. The only difference was that he was a slow-moving, 400-pound robot with a penchant for snapping hundreds of photos a minute without people's permission, and this was San Francisco's Mission District in 2017.

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A Movement for the Toughest Among Us 12.12.2017 Truthout.com
Ready to make a difference? Help Truthout provide a platform for exposing injustice and inspiring action. Click here to make a one-time or monthly donation. My name is Mashyla Buckmaster. I'm 28 years old. I'm the proud single mom of a beautiful one-year-old named Ella. As of today, I'm celebrating almost two years clean and sober. I live in Westport -- in Grays Harbor County, Washington. I've spent five years of my life homeless. Once during my homelessness, a neighbor tried to assault me by throwing a log through the window of the empty building where I was squatting, because he was so enraged that homeless people were living on his block. I got Section 8 housing after my daughter was born, just before my organization began providing cold weather shelter to our homeless members. For 110 days last winter, Chaplains on the Harbor hosted about 20 people in our church -- most of them millennials who caught a record trying to survive in a county with no good jobs, no decent affordable housing, horrible ...
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No Democracy Here: Ousted Honduran President Zelaya Says 2009 US-Backed Coup Led to Election Crisis 8.12.2017 Truthout.com
In an exclusive interview, former Honduran President Manuel Zelaya, who was ousted in a 2009 US-backed coup, says US actions led to the current political crisis in Honduras. The government continues to withhold the results of the November presidential election, which pitted US-backed President Juan Orlando Hernández against opposition candidate Salvador Nasralla. Massive protests erupted after the government-controlled electoral commission stopped tallying votes when the count showed Nasralla ahead. Zelaya now heads the opposition LIBRE party, which is part of the Alliance Against the Dictatorship coalition led by Nasralla. TRANSCRIPT AMY GOODMAN: In Honduras, the political crisis continues as the government is still refusing to release the results of the November 26 presidential election, held almost two weeks ago. The election pits US-backed President Juan Orlando Hernández against opposition candidate Salvador Nasralla, head of the National Alliance Against the Dictatorship. Massive protests erupted ...
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The Era of Walls: Greeting Climate-Change Victims With a Man-Made Dystopia 7.12.2017 Truthout.com
(Photo: Alan Levine ; Edited: LW / TO)   In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout. When I first talked to the three Honduran men in the train yard in the southern Mexican town of Tenosique, I had no idea that they were climate-change refugees. We were 20 miles from the border with Guatemala at a rail yard where Central American refugees often congregated to try to board La Bestia ("the Beast"), the nickname given to the infamous train that has proven so deadly for those traveling north toward the United States. The men hid momentarily as a Mexican army truck with masked, heavily armed soldiers drove by. Given Washington's  pressure  on Mexico to fortify its southern border, US Border Patrol agents might have trained those very soldiers. As soon as they were gone, the Hondurans told me that they had been stuck here for six long days. The night before, they had tried to jump on La Bestia, ...
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Winds of change 3.12.2017 BBC News - US & Canada
Hundreds of mining jobs have been lost in Wyoming, but some workers are getting a new opportunity.
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