User: flenvcenter Topic: Policy and Governance-Independent
Category: Government :: Arizona
Last updated: Feb 14 2020 19:20 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Episode 208: Levi Strauss and corporate philanthropy, how to talk to CFOs 14.2.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Plus, outtakes from GreenBiz 20 interviews with Dow CEO Jim Fitterling, Ecolab CEO Doug Baker, Cargill CSO Ruth Kimmelshue and youth activist Brian Mecinas.
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Dow embraces circularity . . . and fossil fuels 7.2.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Dow is looking to lead on the circular economy — not so much on moving away from fossil fuels.
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What threatens the black-footed ferret? 10.1.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Biologists are trying to understand why the species continues to disappear in the West
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Stopping the flood of marine debris 25.3.2019 GreenBiz.com
The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Execs from impact investing, corporates and NGOs talk ending ocean plastic pollution.
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Mining companies pollute waterways. Citizens pay. 19.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Nearly 2 billion pounds of toxic waste were dumped into western waterways in 2017, and taxpayers are left to clean up the mess.
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Episode 155: Carbon cowboys, plastics problem solvers 18.1.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Plus, NRG proposes a simpler way for companies to procure electricity powered by renewables
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11 hot offstage moments at GreenBiz 18 14.2.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Peek at these (mostly) behind-the-scenes memories from four days of sustainability knowledge-sharing and celebrating last week in Phoenix.
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How private prisons became a booming business 15.5.2017 Current Issue
The numbers and policies behind the immigration-incarceration economy.
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Trump’s Big Boost to Law Enforcement Won’t Make Us Safer — It Will Make Corporations Richer 30.3.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Emily Verdugo

Back in August, the Obama administration issued a memo that many hoped signaled an end to the government’s use of for-profit prison corporations. That memo, issued by then-Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates, stated that the Justice Department would stop contracting with CoreCivic (formerly Corrections Corporation of America) to run 13 federal prisons. This directive was a symbolic win for many of us who opposed these contracts, and we were thrilled when stocks in CoreCivic and GEO Group, another for-profit prison corporation, plummeted as a result.

 

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Latest: Second male jaguar spotted in Arizona 27.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
New draft recovery plan for the Southwest released.
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Private Prisons Are Poised for a Comeback Under Trump. Here’s How to Reform Them. 15.1.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Lauren-Brooke Eisen

Just a few months ago, things were looking very bleak for the private prison industry. In mid-August, the Justice Department’s inspector general issued a report finding that privately operated federal prisons are more dangerous than those managed by the federal Bureau of Prisons and need more oversight. Within a week, the Justice Department announced it would phase out private prisons to house federal inmates.

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In Arizona, reptile poaching made easy 28.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Why some wildlife crimes are difficult to prosecute.
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Travel Should Be The Bridge -- Not The Ammo -- In America's Culture Wars 16.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
As strongly evidenced by last Tuesday's election, we are a divided country. But the evidence had been building for quite a while, and not just on the campaign trail: all too often, we hear calls to "boycott" an institution or place that is associated with an event deemed offensive by a group of people. In September, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all of its upcoming events in North Carolina, owing to that state's controversial "bathroom bill" that is viewed in many quarters as discriminatory against the LGBT community. The NCAA relocated seven championship events in various sports. Indiana was targeted in a similar LGBT-rights dispute last year, and Mississippi has been embroiled in its own such controversy . Previously, Arizona was the subject of a firestorm centered on the equally sensitive topic of immigration . No corner of the country is immune: travel often becomes a cudgel in an ideological skirmish despite -- or maybe because of -- the fact that it is a major factor in ...
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What is a chub, really? 27.10.2016 High Country News Most Recent
In Arizona, three native chub species were reclassified as one, raising concerns about the management of the species.
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Private Prisons Are Far From Ended: 62 Percent of Immigrant Detainees Are in Privatized Jails 19.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
On August 18, the Department of Justice announced an end to using private prisons for its federal prisoners, but the decision does not apply to the 46 immigration jails currently run by private prison corporations. In light of these limitations, what does the announcement mean for mass incarceration and decarceration efforts? Prisoners at Saguaro Correctional Center in Eloy, Arizona, on October 16, 2009. (Monica Almeida / The New York Times) Stories like this can only be published because of readers like you. Show your support for independent journalism by making a small tax-deductible donation today! The US Department of Justice's decision to no longer use private prisons for its federal prisoners is a groundbreaking first step, but the August 18 announcement doesn't spell the end to private prisons: Private prison corporations will continue to control 46 immigration detention centers that detain nearly 25,000 people (or 62 percent of the country's 33,676 immigrant detainees) on any given day. It is ...
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How Private Prison Companies Use Big Tax Breaks and Low Wages to Maximize Profit 8.4.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Prisoners at Saguaro Correctional Center, which is operated by the private prison firm Corrections Corporation of America, in Eloy, Arizona, October 16, 2009. (Monica Almeida / The New York Times) The nation's largest private prison firms are still cutting corners despite millions of dollars in federal income tax breaks. Corrections Corporation of America and GEO Group avoided a combined $113 million in federal income taxes in 2015 alone. Prisoners at Saguaro Correctional Center, which is operated by the private prison firm Corrections Corporation of America, in Eloy, Arizona, October 16, 2009. (Monica Almeida / The New York Times) The two largest private prison firms in the United States are exploiting a loophole in the tax code to secure millions of dollars in corporate tax breaks. Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and GEO Group avoided a combined $113 million in federal income taxes in 2015 alone, according to an analysis of federal financial filings by the racial and economic justice group ...
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#StandWithCharlotte - Don't Give In To Hate! 25.3.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Once again we see a hateful and discriminatory law get rushed through a North Carolina statehouse and signed by the state's Governor in the cover of darkness. All of American society must rise up again, as we did in Arizona and Indiana http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christine-pelosi/dont-enshrine-inequality-in-indiana-repeal-sb101_b_6966316.html bring this law up in the light of day and see that it codifies legally approved discrimination against the LGBT community and all of that community's allies, friends, business associates, and family. Already we have seen faith leaders and civil society join with sports teams and commerce agents and call this law regressive, damaging and dangerous. We saw CEO's at Bank of America, Biogen, Dow, and Safesforce stand up and speak out that this law is not only wrong but it is bad for business. And we know that Americans of goodwill across our great country are learning of this travesty and vowing to condemn bigotry and embrace LGBT equality. The North Carolina law ...
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Western states react strongly to Supreme Court stay of Clean Power Plan 13.2.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Some states stop all work on cutting greenhouse gases but others forge ahead.
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How ICE Shields Its Financial Dealings With Private Prison Contractors From Public Scrutiny 31.1.2016 Truthout.com
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is fighting hard to hide from public scrutiny the workings of its contracts with private prison corporations. The decisions that ICE makes to spend its detention budget should be publicly accessible. A Mexican farmworker is detained after trying to enter the US in Nogales, Arizona, February 20, 2013. Because ICE has already promised to pay contractors regardless of whether beds are filled, ICE faces pressure and incentives to funnel the people it arrests to privately operated facilities. (Photo: Joshua Lott / The New York Times) The movement to put private prison contractors out of business won some amazing victories in 2015.  In the last two months, responding to organized action by California's Afrikan Black Coalition and campus Black Student Unions, the University of California announced it would be selling its $23 million stake in the private prison industry.  Just six months ago, in response to months of student protest, Columbia University became the first ...
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How Western towns ​profit​ from detaining immigrants 3.11.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Detention facilities provide economic stability for many rural towns.
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