User: flenvcenter Topic: Policy and Governance-Independent
Category: Government :: Colorado
Last updated: Jan 11 2018 16:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 209    
What threatens the black-footed ferret? 10.1.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Biologists are trying to understand why the species continues to disappear in the West
Also found in: [+]
Mining companies pollute waterways. Citizens pay. 19.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Nearly 2 billion pounds of toxic waste were dumped into western waterways in 2017, and taxpayers are left to clean up the mess.
Also found in: [+]
Latest: Chronic wasting disease hits Montana deer, elk 11.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
State scrambles to respond to discovery of deadly neurological disease
Also found in: [+]
The "Happiest" City in the US Has a Secret: It's White and Wealthy 13.12.2017 Truthout.com
This article was originally published at TalkPoverty.org. "How is one to tell about joy? How describe the citizens of Omelas? ... I do not know the rules and laws of their society, but I suspect that they were singularly few. One thing I know there is none of in Omelas is guilt." —Ursula K. Le Guin, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas Earlier this year, National Geographic published an article claiming to have discovered the 25 happiest cities in the United States. The measurements were based on a scale developed by Gallup, with input from Dan Buettner, who has spent decades traveling the globe in pursuit of the roots of happiness. Even with all that experience, Buettner's findings (reported in the article by George Stone) seem to overlook one glaring problem: American happiness appears to be rich and white. The city that tops Nat Geo's list this year is Boulder, Colorado. Boulder is a small town nestled in the Rocky Mountains, known for its biking paths, clean air, and youthful population; the latter of ...
Also found in: [+]
Rocky Flats Made Nukes. Then It Made A Mess. Now It's About To Become A Public Park. 21.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ROCKY FLATS, Colo. ― Plutonium, named for the Roman god of the underworld and the dwarf planet at the edge of the solar system, is one of the world’s most dangerous elements. Inhaling just one particle will bombard internal organs, particularly the lungs and liver, with harmful alpha radiation for decades. For the most part, it isn’t naturally occurring. But until just over a decade ago, it was plentiful in this 5,000-acre patch of rolling hills and grasslands. From 1952 to 1989, this picturesque sanctuary was home to a factory that produced plutonium triggers for nuclear weapons ― a lot of them. Nearly all of the approximately 70,000  nuclear weapons produced in the United States include a part made at Rocky Flats. It was designated as a Superfund site in the early 1990s, and the radioactive materials have been removed. It’s scheduled to open to the public for the first time next summer . But rather than welcoming the prospect of thousands of new acres for recreation, some Coloradans are suing to stop ...
Also found in: [+]
Untethered existences; Tacos in traffic; movin’ on up in Seattle 20.3.2017 Current Issue
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
Also found in: [+]
Wall Street and Private Prisons 'Licking Their Lips' Over Trump Presidency 17.11.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

A new report from the research organization In the Public Interest (ITPI) highlights the banks that finance the private prison industry—and with a Trump administration on the horizon, they could be in for a windfall.

Also found in: [+]
What is a chub, really? 27.10.2016 High Country News Most Recent
In Arizona, three native chub species were reclassified as one, raising concerns about the management of the species.
Also found in: [+]
What next for Colorado's home-grown carbon offset program? 15.8.2016 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Eight years after launching a public-private carbon offset program, it's time for a shift in strategy.
Also found in: [+]
It's Been A Rough Few Weeks For The Private Prison Industry 22.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Despite the bizarre politics on display in Cleveland, sometimes knowing where someone stands on an issue is pretty straightforward. We can be sure about this: The private prison industry doesn't share our goal of ending mass incarceration. In fact, they profit more the bigger our criminal justice system grows--the country's two largest private prison companies, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and GEO Group, made $361 million in profits in 2015 alone. Think about what we could do with that money. We could invest in things people really need, like job training and mental health care, and alternatives to incarceration. In the past few weeks we've taken big steps towards getting our money back from the shareholders, executives, and Wall Street banks that profit from mass incarceration: Colorado's Kit Carson Correctional Center, operated by CCA, will close at the end of this month--it will be the fourth private prison to close in the state since 2009. The Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition ...
Also found in: [+]
The grand plan to save the Yellowstone River 27.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Can one man’s pie-in-the-sky idea save one the West’s most iconic and underloved rivers?
Also found in: [+]
Local cleanup control 16.5.2016 Current Issue
Also found in: [+]
Silverton’s Gold King reckoning 2.5.2016 High Country News Most Recent
How the Animas River disaster forced Silverton to face its pollution problem — and its destiny.
Also found in: [+]
White-nose comes West, readers respond to Grand Canyon harassment, and the election out West 2.5.2016 High Country News Most Recent
HCN.org news in brief.
Also found in: [+]
Western states react strongly to Supreme Court stay of Clean Power Plan 13.2.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Some states stop all work on cutting greenhouse gases but others forge ahead.
Also found in: [+]
Forget Star Wars; Get Ready for Water Wars 20.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-written by Stephen J. McConnell Stephen J. McConnell is a Denver-based writer who recently finished a novel that explores a catastrophic environmental collapse and its implications. A great war looms, one that will rise from the most desperate circumstance: our battle over water. Today, we war because of a chasm of values and ideologies, national and religious differences. But quietly, a new conflict is budding in the shadows, one that many of us have not taken much notice of because it isn't given the attention it's due, especially by the "shallow pool" of candidates running for president of the United States. If trends persist and a growing body of scientific evidence holds true, we may be at war, or at least find ourselves hurled into new geo-political conflicts, for something that most of us, at least in first-world countries, take for granted -- water. I say this not to be an alarmist, to spread fear for the sake of spreading it, because of an "agenda" or a desire to manufacture attention. I say ...
Also found in: [+]
Asylum Seekers Detained in Aurora 30.12.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo credit: Gabriela Flora/American Friends Service Committee Like most Coloradans, I've spent this holiday season enjoying time with my family, feasting on delicious food, and being grateful for the relative abundance and safety that surround me in this country. I was shaken out of my holiday bliss when I received a call from a concerned constituent about a group of seventeen aspiring Americans being detained at a for-profit prison, GEO, located in Aurora, CO, just outside of my district. They have been deprived of their families, their communities, and most importantly, their freedom. They have now given up food, initiating a hunger strike to bring light to the untenable situation they face. They fled their home countries of Bangladesh, Pakistan and India to escape political persecution, torture and probable death. Despite following the proper security and immigration procedures to seek asylum, these men have been held at the detention facility for 14 months, with no road to freedom in sight. These ...
Also found in: [+]
Western State Regulators Struggling to Keep Up With Radioactive Fracking and Drilling Waste 29.11.2015 Truthout - All Articles
The question of how to handle the toxic waste from fracking and other oil and gas activities is one of the most intractable issues confronting environmental regulators. A new report details a string of illegal dumping incidents. Fracking fluid and other drilling wastes sit in an unlined pit in North Belridge, California, July 11, 2014. (Photo: Faces of Fracking ) The question of how to handle the toxic waste from fracking and other oil and gas activities is one of the most intractable issues confronting environmental regulators. Not only because of the sheer volume of waste generated nationwide, but also because some of the radioactive materials involved have a half-life of over 1,500 years , making the consequences of decision-making today especially long-lasting. Every year, the oil and gas industry generates roughly 21 billion barrels of wastewater and millions of tons of solid waste, much of it carrying a mix of naturally occurring radioactive materials, and some of it bearing so much radioactive ...
Also found in: [+]
NASA: Sea Level Rise Likely To Get Much Worse 28.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Sea levels worldwide rose an average of nearly 3 inches (8 cm) since 1992, the result of warming waters and melting ice, a panel of NASA scientists said on Wednesday. In 2013, a United Nations panel predicted sea levels would rise from 1 to 3 feet (0.3 to 0.9 meters) by the end of the century. The new research shows that sea level rise most likely will be at the high end of that range, said University of Colorado geophysicist Steve Nerem. Sea levels are rising faster than they did 50 years ago and “it’s very likely to get worse in the future,” Nerem said. The changes are not uniform. Some areas showed sea levels rising more than 9 inches (25 cm) and other regions, such as along the U.S. West Coast, actually falling, according to an analysis of 23 years of satellite data. Scientists believe ocean currents and natural cycles are temporarily offsetting a sea level rise in the Pacific and the U.S. West Coast could see a significant hike in sea levels in the next 20 years. “People need to understand that the ...
Also found in: [+]
Global Sea Levels Climbed 3 Inches Since 1992, Research Shows 28.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sea levels worldwide rose an average of nearly 3 inches (8 cm) since 1992, the result of warming waters and melting ice, a panel of NASA scientists said on Wednesday. In 2013, a United Nations panel predicted sea levels would rise from 1 to 3 feet (0.3 to 0.9 meters) by the end of the century. The new research shows that sea level rise most likely will be at the high end of that range, said University of Colorado geophysicist Steve Nerem. Sea levels are rising faster than they did 50 years ago and “it’s very likely to get worse in the future,” Nerem said. The changes are not uniform. Some areas showed sea levels rising more than 9 inches (25 cm) and other regions, such as along the U.S. West Coast, actually falling, according to an analysis of 23 years of satellite data. Scientists believe ocean currents and natural cycles are temporarily offsetting a sea level rise in the Pacific and the U.S. West Coast could see a significant hike in sea levels in the next 20 years. “People need to understand that the ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 209