User: flenvcenter Topic: Policy and Governance-Independent
Category: Government :: Utah
Last updated: Sep 02 2019 19:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Mormon Church supplied tainted water to its members for years 2.9.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Utah regulators turned a blind eye to faulty water systems at a girls’ summer camp, trusting the LDS Church would eventually fix the problem.
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In Utah, public access to state lands comes at a cost 27.11.2017 Current Issue
Public access to trust lands varies widely from state to state.
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The monkey on art’s back; Bigfoot in Idaho; Tent City’s second life 1.5.2017 Current Issue
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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New Map Shows How Groundwater Pumping Could Affect the Malad River 7.4.2017 Environmental News Network
A new report illustrates how groundwater pumping can affect the amount of water available in streams within the Malad-Lower Bear River Area in Utah. The product was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights.
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Latest: Gray wolves delisted in Wyoming 21.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The state will take over management of the species.
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Untethered existences; Tacos in traffic; movin’ on up in Seattle 20.3.2017 Current Issue
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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Michigan Proposes Approval for Controversial Mine Near Sacred Tribal Sites 6.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Brian Bienkowski, Environmental Health News

The State of Michigan on Friday announced its intention to approve, over tribal protests, an open pit mine near burial and other culturally important sites in the Upper Peninsula.

The mine would provide an economic boost to the region and metals such as gold, zinc, copper and silver that fuel our tech- and gadget-driven lifestyle. But would come at the expense of land and water that is central to the existence of the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin. The decision comes as Native Americans across the country are unifying to buck the trend of development on off-reservation land.

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The Terrifying Job Of Helping A Trapped, Angry Mountain Lion 15.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
How do you help a wounded animal that thinks you want to hurt it, and could tear you to shreds in a matter of seconds if it ever gets its paws on you?  Very, very carefully.  A heart-stopping video shows rescuers in Utah working to free a ticked-off mountain lion who got caught in a bobcat trap.   The rescue was captured on video by Division of Wildlife Resources conservation officer Mark Ekins, who told KSL that most cougars can escape bobcat traps on their own without injury. But from time to time, this happens. Ekins admitted he was nervous during the rescue effort, and said that's a good thing.  "If I wasn't nervous or started to lack respect for the power of that animal, it could potentially be very dangerous ," Ekins told the station. "I'm nervous and I'm extremely careful when doing it… I've probably only done three in my career that were as big as the one you saw. That was a really big one." Not only does the cougar look intimidating, it also lets out a few angry snarls that sound like something ...
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Western states react strongly to Supreme Court stay of Clean Power Plan 13.2.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Some states stop all work on cutting greenhouse gases but others forge ahead.
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Big cat cruelty in Utah and the first recorded California condor in New Mexico 8.6.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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Bison, cows and rabbits square off on Utah range 27.1.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Study says jackrabbits, not bison, are cattle's main competitors in the Henry Mountains.
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Death of Utah wolf is collateral damage 16.1.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Shooting was side-effect of state's aggressive push to exterminate coyotes
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Famed Gray Wolf Possibly Killed In Utah 31.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Laura Zuckerman Dec 30 (Reuters) - A gray wolf killed by a Utah hunter may have been "Echo," a female who attracted national attention after wandering through several states to become the first of the protected animals seen at Arizona's Grand Canyon in 70 years, officials said on Tuesday. The hunter, who was not named by authorities, told Utah wildlife officers on Sunday that he accidentally shot and killed a wolf equipped with a radio collar near the Arizona border after mistaking it for a coyote. Wolves in Utah are protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, which bans killing of imperiled animals without a special permit, but coyotes in the state are allowed to be shot on sight. The incident, which is coming under sharp criticism by conservationists, is being investigated by federal and state conservation officers as a possible violation of U.S. and Utah wildlife laws, authorities said. Information gleaned from the radio collar shows the wolf killed in Utah was a 3-year-old ...
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Sage grouse found walking through Wyoming underpass 10.11.2014 Current Issue
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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The Uintah Basin's tricky oil and gas ozone problem 4.11.2014 High Country News Most Recent
Can officials greenlight booming development and clean up the air at the same time?
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The Original Geo-Engineers: How Beavers Can Help Save the Humans 29.7.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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The Original Geo-Engineers: Or How to Save the Iconic West From the Cow 29.7.2014 Truthout.com
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Despite Widespread Drought, West's Fire Season So Far Is Below Expectations 24.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — Widespread drought across the West had forecasters expecting an above-average wildfire season this summer, which so far has not lived up to expectations. U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said Wednesday that the hot windy weather known as "red flag" days have not lined up with the lighting strikes that start most fires, particularly in drought-parched California. The result has been that while the number of fires to date is about 70 percent of the 10-year average, the area burned is less than half. But that is changing, Tidwell said from Washington, D.C. Eighteen large fires were burning in the Northwest with intensities not normally seen until August. With only about $1 billion budgeted for fighting wildfires, the Forest Service expects by late August to once again have to tap other funds, such as forest thinning projects, to continue fighting fires as the season goes on into the fall, Tidwell said. Last year, that amount was $500 million. "If we can stop a fire from coming ...
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Well, This Is One Way To Fill A Lake Full Of Fish 11.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This crazy video shows how Utah wildlife managers restock remote lakes with fish from their hatcheries -- by dropping them out of a low-flying plane. Ted Hallows , the Kamas State Fish Hatchery supervisor, posted nine videos of aerial stocking in Utah over a year ago, but according to the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources the practice has been going on since 1956 . Hallows previously told Fox 13 News that he captured the footage by putting a GoPro on the restocking plane . According to Hallows, stocking remote lakes used to take months of walking in with milk cans full of fish, but now it only takes a few hours. Planes dip to about 150 feet above the lakes before releasing their cargo. Though it looks like a harrowing drop, Hallows says that most of the fish do in fact reach the water safely . Utah is not the only state to use this method -- other states such as New Hampshire and West Virginia use aerial restocking as ...
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Chronic Dryness Hinders Fight Against West's Fires 8.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WINTERS, Calif. (AP) — Crews fought through a rugged landscape, triple-digit heat, gusty winds, and the stark and chronic dryness of California's long drought to make hard-earned progress against a wildfire burning for its fourth day. Such dry conditions have hurt the fight against other wildfires in Nevada, Idaho, New Mexico, Utah and Washington state. In Northern California, crews were able to increase containment of the Monticello Fire to 45 percent from 35 percent in the steep mountains near Lake Berryessa in Yolo County. More than 1,600 firefighters battling the blaze Monday gained on its front end as temperatures soared past 100 degrees, said state fire spokesman Chris Christopherson. The heat was expected to reach the 90s on Tuesday. "We're going to have an aggressive attack not only from the ground but the air as well to maintain our control lines," said Christopherson. All road closures were canceled Monday, a day after evacuation orders for about 40 homes were called off. The fire has burned ...
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