User: flenvcenter Topic: Policy and Governance-Independent
Category: Elections n Elected Officials :: New Mexico
Last updated: Oct 10 2017 15:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 166    
David Bernhardt confirmed as Secretary of the Interior 12.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
The former oil lobbyist has connections with industries that could profit from his decisions managing the nation’s natural and cultural resources.
Also found in: [+]
Contamination from an Air Force base devastates a New Mexico dairy 28.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
An investigation shows the impact toxic chemicals are having on the community of Clovis.
Also found in: [+]
The takedown of the Clean Power Plan begins 10.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Scott Pruitt helps Trump deliver on campaign promise: Reduce EPA to ‘little tidbits.’
Also found in: [+]
Senators Seek To Ban Brain-Damaging Pesticide That Trump's EPA Chief Refused To 25.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A leading organization of pediatricians warned in June that the continued use of chlorpyrifos "puts all children at risk."
Also found in: [+]
Senators To Trump: Hands Off America's National Monuments 12.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
“I guarantee you, somewhere, Teddy Roosevelt is rolling over in his grave."
Also found in: [+]
10 things senators want you to know about budget cuts 22.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Senators critiqued cuts to the Land Water Conservation Fund and National Park Service.
Also found in: [+]
A conversation with Obama’s top Interior lawyer 5.4.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A look at how the department has changed its relationships with tribes, and at legal battles on the horizon.
Also found in: [+]
Senators Plead With Trump To Rescind Climate Executive Order 29.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Ten Democratic senators from Western states sent President Donald Trump a letter Tuesday, urging him to drop his executive order rolling back policies enacted to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The letter  outlines how Trump’s plan ― which will likely undo the Clean Power Plan and lift the temporary moratorium on coal leasing ― will stifle the economy in those states, where much of the opportunity for renewable energy enterprise lies, and aggravate public health issues, extreme weather concerns, threats to natural lands and security concerns for the whole country.  The letter was signed by Michael Bennet (D-Colo.), Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.), Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Patty Murray (D-Wash.), Tom Udall (D-N.M.) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.). President Trump just threw away a plan to combat climate change & protect the air we breathe. Three words of advice: rescind it now. — Kamala Harris (@SenKamalaHarris) ...
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change "Debater" Ryan Zinke Confirmed as Interior Secretary With Help of 17 Dems 2.3.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Rep. Ryan Zinke of Montana speaks at the 2016 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, on March 3, 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) President Trump's Secretary of the Interior was confirmed on Wednesday by the Senate. Rep. Ryan Zinke (R-Mont.) was approved by the upper chamber in a 68-31 vote , with 17 members of the Democratic Caucus backing his nomination. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) spoke out against Zinke's selection before the vote, casting doubt on the Congressman's prior pledges to oppose the sale of public lands. The Department of the Interior oversees, among other agencies, the country's National Park Service. "You can't be a Roosevelt Conservationist, when you vote to make it easier to sell off public lands," Schumer said. Zinke, an avid outdoorsman, claims to be for the preservation of parks, in the mold of NPS-founder, former Republican President Theodore Roosevelt. He has stated repeatedly that he opposes the privatization of public lands, ...
Also found in: [+]
How Opponents Sank A GOP Bill To Sell Off Federal Land — And What They Learned 27.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — Perhaps it was lingering outrage from the election. Or it could have been the  explicit language of the bill , which called for the “ disposal ” of millions of acres of “excess” federal lands. Whatever the driving force, the backlash to legislation from Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) that would have sold off 3.3 million acres of public land in 10 Western states was swift and fierce. Outrage erupted on Facebook and Twitter, advocacy groups urged supporters to bombard  their congressional representatives’ phone lines, and a petition opposing the sale or transfer of public lands  drew tens of thousands of signatures.  Less than two weeks after introducing the controversial bill , Chaffetz  pulled it , citing concerns from his constituents. Advocates fighting to protect public lands celebrated it as a victory . “The first takeaway is that the squeaky wheel still gets the grease,” said  Land Tawney , the president and CEO of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers , a Montana-based nonprofit dedicated to ...
Also found in: [+]
Dem Senator Calls On Barack Obama To Defend Standing Rock Protesters 1.12.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) is calling on President Barack Obama to condemn the recent violence against  Dakota Access Pipeline  protesters. “I write to urge your renewed personal attention to the pressing issues surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline,” he wrote in a letter to Obama Wednesday. “There have been far too many dangerous violent confrontations between protestors and state and local law enforcement, with serious injuries resulting.” The letter comes nearly three months after the Obama administration paused construction on the controversial pipeline over water safety concerns that the Standing Rock Sioux and other tribes raised. While some consider  pipelines to be one of the most efficient ways to shuttle oil across regions, serous incidents are actually quite common. In 2015 alone, there were a record 132 significant spills, according to CNN . The Dakota Access Pipeline would stretch roughly 1,200 miles from North Dakota to Illinois and transport around 470,000 gallons of crude oil each day, ...
Also found in: [+]
A New (Old) Approach on Climate Change 17.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The landmark Paris climate agreement opened a new chapter in confronting an enormous challenge to our planet.  I believe that it also gave new life to a Clean Air Act provision that traces its roots to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson when my father was Interior Secretary.  And as communities in New Mexico and across the globe increasingly battle the impacts of climate change - while congressional gridlock prevents the United States from taking significant action - this provision offers new avenues for action.   My father, Stewart Udall, was determined to make science a cornerstone of federal decision-making.  The person he hired as the Department's first science adviser was a distinguished oceanographer, Roger Revelle, who recognized even then the looming dangers of climate change. Revelle collaborated with Johnson's top science advisers on a prescient report entitled "Restoring the Quality of Our Environment."    This 1965 report from the President's Science Advisory Committee devoted a chapter to ...
Also found in: [+]
Divest to Invest: The New Global Movement 14.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the big topics currently on the minds of those who are concerned about climate change from college students to those planning for retirement is how to combine concern for the future health of the planet with money issues and economic safety. Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) recently put forth an amendment to the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2016 . It called for the Secretary of the Treasury to develop a blueprint to initiate Clean Energy Victory Bonds . The goal was to use the example of World War II Bonds to mobilize the American public, and to raise revenue to finance clean energy undertakings. The projected goal was $50 billion. On April 19, a vote tally of 50 yes and 47 no fell short of the requisite 62 votes needed for passage. The concept was simple and positive, yet the usual naysayers were part of the opposition: Jeff Sessions (R-AL), a top Trump endorser; Chuck Grassley (R-IA), who is blocking the Supreme Court nomination process; James Inhofe (R-OK), climate denier. Another option is ...
Also found in: [+]
In rare bipartisan decision, Senate approves Yakima water projects 22.4.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Conservation, wilderness and water provisions long in the works were added to the massive energy bill.
Also found in: [+]
At Valles Caldera, a new national park unit takes shape 7.3.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The national preserve was recently added to the park system, ending an experiment in funding and managing federal lands outside the traditional agencies.
Also found in: [+]
Western senators angle to influence Paris climate talks 9.12.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Wyoming's Barrasso is undermining the treaty, while New Mexico's Udall flew to Paris to support it.
Also found in: [+]
Senate Looks Poised To Pass Major Overhaul Of Chemical Safety Law 3.10.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
 WASHINGTON -- The Senate may pass bipartisan environmental legislation as soon as next week, and it's kind of a big deal. Sens. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) and Ed Markey (D-Mass.) on Friday announced support for a bill overhauling the country's decades-old chemical safety law, bringing the number of co-sponsors to 60.  The bill would reform the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act, which has been widely panned as outdated and ineffective at protecting the public from hazardous chemicals. It would give the Environmental Protection Agency more authority to test and regulate chemicals, and to identify risky chemicals that should not be on the market. A Senate committee  approved the legislation  in April. Sens. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) and David Vitter (R-La.) have taken the lead on the reform bill, and agreed to additional changes to accommodate the concerns of Markey and Durbin. The changes include increased funding from industry fees, which will pay for additional EPA testing, as well as faster compliance timelines for ...
Also found in: [+]
These Wobbly Democrats Could Stop The Anti-Iran Deal Bill In Its Tracks 3.9.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Back in early August, before Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) even announced his own position on the Iran deal, he speculated  that there may end up being enough votes in the Senate to block the GOP effort to kill the deal before it even made it to the president's desk. Republicans in Congress could pass an initial resolution of disapproval of the Iran deal, which lifts sanctions on the country in return for Iran dismantling its nuclear infrastructure and agreeing to nuclear inspections. If the anti-deal bill passed, President Barack Obama would veto it. The conventional wisdom in Washington was that the best Democrats could do in that scenario was muscle 34 votes, the number needed to sustain a presidential veto. But now that 34 Democrats have come forward , the notion that deal-supporters could muster 41 -- the number needed to filibuster and stop a bill in the Senate -- is no longer far-fetched. Stopping the disapproval resolution cold in the Senate would save Obama -- and, not ...
Also found in: [+]
Here Are The Wobbly Democrats Who Could Make Or Break The Iran Deal 13.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
  WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama needs 34 senators or 144 House members to stick with him in support of the nuclear deal recently negotiated with Iran. Obama has vowed to veto a congressional resolution of disapproval, which lawmakers are scheduled to vote on in September, and one-third of either chamber will be required to prevent the veto from being overturned. The House is considered an easier playing field for Obama, since Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is a strong backer of the deal and has proven adept at holding together her caucus. But much of the speculation has focused on the Senate, where a close look at the landscape suggests that the White House may be able to get to 34. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) even  suggested  this week that the chamber may not have the votes to pass the resolution of disapproval in the first place, meaning Obama might not have to use his veto power. With the possible exception of Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), Republicans are expected to vote as a party ...
Also found in: [+]
Toxic Substances, Nontoxic Policy 16.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Each year, tens of thousands of animals are killed to test industrial chemicals, including ingredients found in common household products in our homes. These animals suffer terribly , as harsh chemicals are rubbed into their skin, forced down their throats, and even dropped in their eyes. Some tests involve administering these chemicals over a prolonged period of time causing horrific deaths. But now, there's good news in Congress for modern science-based alternatives to chemical testing that do not rely on animals. The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (S. 697) , introduced by Sens. David Vitter, R-La., and Tom Udall, D-N.M., and cosponsored by a bipartisan group of 46 other lawmakers, would significantly improve the science behind chemical testing, resulting in better safety decisions to protect the environment and human health. The bill  language would lead to the use of  fewer animals in testing and, in some cases, could eliminate it. Today, I want to call out Senator Cory ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 166