User: flenvcenter Topic: Policy and Governance-Independent
Category: Elections n Elected Officials :: Arizona
Last updated: Jul 25 2015 24:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Art of the 'Real' Deal 25.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Donald Trump likes "people that weren't captured." When I heard Trump's babbling ramble about Senator John McCain , my thoughts were not with the senator, whose story and character of service are legendary. My thoughts were of a part of France that is forever green -- "Marine green" -- and the families of three Marines; Colonel Peter Ortiz , Sergeant Major John Bodnar and Mr. (former Staff Sergeant) Jack Risler . The parts of France I refer to are the Alpine resort Col d'Saisies and the little town of Centron whose residents would be proud to tell Mr. Trump, or anyone, for that matter, they not only "like" some who were captured, but in fact love and revere three Marines who surrendered to the Germans in 1944! I know, because in 2004 more than 6000 of them showed up to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the unique US Marine-Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) UNION II mission to the French Resistance in Haute Savoie that Ortiz led and Bodnar and Risler were a part of. It was my privilege as a Marine ...
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Oak Flat: The Latest Land Grab From Native Americans 23.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A " sneak law " attachment to a "must-pass" bill gives sacred Native American land to a foreign mining company. How did this happen? Do you remember that "Citibank budget," where a budget bill to avert an imminent government shutdown suddenly had in it a Citibank-written provision deregulating certain risky financial trades? If Congress voted against the budget, the government would shut down, so Citibank got its way? This is how " sneak laws " get through. Usually, We the People don't get a chance to learn about them in time to do something about it, and this was one example. Another example of this happened in last year's National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015. On page 1,103 of the 1,648-page bill is a provision giving more than 2400 acres of land in Arizona's Tonto National Forest to Resolution Copper, which is part of London-based Rio Tinto and Melbourn-based BHP Billiton , giant mining companies. This was done by Arizona Republican Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake and Arizona ...
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American Backstab: Sarah Palin's Second Betrayal of John McCain 21.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Leave it to the quitter governor Sarah Palin -- she of the continued snake-oil peddling in American politics -- to pretend to come down in the middle of what is a very real and ugly schism in the Republican Party fueled by Donald Trump's shameful attack on former GOP presidential candidate John McCain. It's another Palin con job: She's nowhere in the middle of the road on this one; she's in a ditch somewhere to the right side of demagoguery -- clearly siding with Trump and chastising McCain for his criticisms of Trump and those who support his racist rhetoric. Trump's assault on McCain's military career over the weekend -- in which he derisively mocked McCain's five-and-half years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam ("I prefer people who aren't captured)" -- marked one of the lower blows in what is a decidedly low-blow political career. Trump has been eviscerated by those across the political spectrum who have rightfully noted that the horrific conditions endured by McCain -- and others who were forced into ...
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Apache Stronghold Caravan Calls to Protect Sacred Sites 20.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Members of the San Carlos Apache Tribe are fighting to preserve sacred sites in Arizona after lawmakers slipped a clause into the National Defense Authorization Act that would allow copper mining in the area. The land in question includes parts of Tonto National Forest, including Oak Flat and Devil's Canyon, and could also impact nearby Apache Leap, an important historic site where a group of Apache who were being pursued by US cavalry plunged off a cliff to their deaths rather than be captured. Resolution Copper Mining, a subsidiary of British-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto, has long sought ownership of the land. But the battle is not over. Earlier this month, a group called the Apache Stronghold began a caravan from Tucson, Arizona, to Washington, DC, to call for this land to once again be protected. On their way, they stopped in New York today and joined us in our studio. We speak with Wendsler Nosie Sr., Peridot District Council member and former chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe. He's the ...
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The EPA Will Not Regulate Your Barbecue 10.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The following post first appeared on FactCheck.org . A Republican congressman says the Environmental Protection Agency wants “to stop you and I from grilling,” and he has proposed legislation that would prohibit federal regulation of backyard barbecues. Rep. Richard Hudson cites an EPA “study,” but that is actually a student design project; the EPA says it has no plans to regulate barbecues. Hudson, a Republican from North Carolina, joins a number of other politicians who have criticized a specific grant awarded by the EPA to a project aimed at reducing possible health effects related to residential grilling. For example, in May, Sen. John McCain included this particular grant as part of his “ America’s Most Wasted ” report, which highlighted what he considered examples of wasteful government spending. More recently, Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio also featured the barbecue issue in his “Your Tax Dollars … Down the Drain” series. Hudson spoke on the House floor to add an amendment to the Department of the ...
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Democrats Pounce As Republicans Split Over Confederate Flag 10.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker John Boehner's day went from bad to worse Thursday as his efforts to quietly ease a fight over the Confederate flag blew up. Democrats seized the opportunity to denounce Republicans as defenders of a painful symbol of racism. Democrats have been fuming since Wednesday night, when Rep. Ken Calvert (R-Calif.) put forward a vaguely worded amendment to attach to an annual spending bill that would allow the Confederate flag to be displayed in national cemeteries. Rep. Betty McCollum (D-Minn.) noticed the meaning of it. As Democratic furor grew, Boehner ultimately pulled the entire bill off the floor and temporarily from the House schedule on Thursday, saying he wanted both sides to talk it out and would bring it back up later. Boehner was hoping that would be the end of it, at least for now. The Ohio Republican certainly wanted to avoid drawing attention to members of his caucus who were defending the Confederate flag -- particularly on a day when South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley ...
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Obama To Upgrade Malaysia On Human Rights Despite Mass Graves 9.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration will remove Malaysia from its official list of the world's worst human trafficking offenders, according to Reuters , a move human rights advocates fear will damage U.S. credibility. The maneuver would allow the administration to continue negotiating a controversial trade agreement with Malaysia and 10 other Pacific nations. Legislation authored by Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) effectively bars the U.S. from enacting trade deals with countries deemed "Tier 3" violators of human trafficking standards -- the worst of the worst in the State Department's formal reckoning of governments that facilitate modern-day slavery. Malaysia earned its spot on that list, alongside Iran and North Korea, from years of human trafficking, including rampant sex slavery and forced labor in the agriculture and the textile industries, according to 2014 State Department documents. Malaysia's electronics industry also is rife with forced labor . This year, mass graves for trafficking victims ...
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How Government, Business And Labor Can Better Protect Workers 6.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This story was  published  by  The Center for Public Integrity , a nonprofit, nonpartisan investigative news organization in Washington, D.C. The country’s safeguards against toxic workplace exposures are dangerously weak, but they don’t have to stay that way. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration takes years, sometimes decades , to develop rules for individual chemicals and other hazardous substances. That’s why most of the agency’s exposure limits haven’t been updated since 1971 , and why the vast majority of chemicals have no workplace limits at all . It’s part of the reason that an estimated 50,000 Americans die from job-related illnesses each year. Sweeping changes would require action from Congress, given how courts have interpreted what OSHA must do to set chemical limits. The agency could wait a long time for such assistance — Congress sometimes intervenes to make the process even harder. But OSHA, employers and worker advocates can make strides against workplace disease and death ...
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Russia vs China: The Conflict in Washington Over Who Should Lead America's Enemies List 30.6.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com America’s grand strategy, its long-term blueprint for advancing national interests and countering major adversaries, is in total disarray. Top officials lurch from crisis to crisis, improvising strategies as they go, but rarely pursuing a consistent set of policies. Some blame this indecisiveness on a lack of resolve at the White House, but the real reason lies deeper. It lurks in a disagreement among foreign policy elites over whether Russia or China constitutes America’s principal great-power adversary. Knowing one’s enemy is usually considered the essence of strategic planning. During the Cold War, enemy number one was, of course, unquestioned: it was the Soviet Union, and everything Washington did was aimed at diminishing Moscow’s reach and power. When the USSR imploded and disappeared, all that was left to challenge U.S. dominance were a few “rogue states.” In the wake of 9/11, however, President Bush declared a “global war on terror,” envisioning a decades-long ...
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Russia vs. China: The Coming of Cold War 2.0 30.6.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Russia vs. China: The Conflict in Washington Over Who Should Lead the US Enemies List 30.6.2015 Truthout - All Articles
America’s grand strategy, its long-term blueprint for advancing national interests and countering major adversaries, is in total disarray. Top officials lurch from crisis to crisis, improvising strategies as they go, but rarely pursuing a consistent set of policies. Some blame this indecisiveness on a lack of resolve at the White House, but the real reason lies deeper. It lurks in a disagreement among foreign policy elites over whether Russia or China constitutes America’s principal great-power adversary. Knowing one’s enemy is usually considered the essence of strategic planning. During the Cold War, enemy number one was, of course, unquestioned: it was the Soviet Union, and everything Washington did was aimed at diminishing Moscow’s reach and power. When the USSR imploded and disappeared, all that was left to challenge U.S. dominance were a few “rogue states.” In the wake of 9/11, however, President Bush declared a “global war on terror,” envisioning a decades-long campaign against Islamic extremists ...
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The Hoax of Climate Denial: Why “Politically Motivated” Science Is Good Science 16.6.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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The Hoax of Climate Denial 16.6.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Recently, the Washington Post  reported  new data showing something most of us already sense: that increased polarization on Capitol Hill is due to the way the Republican Party has lurched to the right. The authors of the study use Senator John McCain to illustrate the point. McCain's political odyssey is, in some dismaying sense, close to my own heart, since it highlights the Republican turn against science. As unlikely as it might seem today, in the first half of the twentieth century the Republicans were the party that most strongly supported scientific work, as they recognized the diverse ways in which it could undergird economic activity and national security. The Democrats were more dubious, tending to see science as elitist and worrying that new federal agencies like the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health would concentrate resources in elite East Coast universities. In recent decades, of course, the Republicans have lurched rightward ...
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The Hoax of Climate Denial: Why "Politically Motivated" Science Is Good Science 16.6.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Recently, the Washington Post  reported  new data showing something most of us already sense: that increased polarization on Capitol Hill is due to the way the Republican Party has lurched to the right. The authors of the study use Senator John McCain to illustrate the point. McCain's political odyssey is, in some dismaying sense, close to my own heart, since it highlights the Republican turn against science. As unlikely as it might seem today, in the first half of the twentieth century the Republicans were the party that most strongly supported scientific work, as they recognized the diverse ways in which it could undergird economic activity and national security. The Democrats were more dubious, tending to see science as elitist and worrying that new federal agencies like the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health would concentrate resources in elite East Coast universities. In recent decades, of course, the Republicans have lurched rightward on many topics and now regularly ...
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Senators Push Iran Sanctions Extension Ahead Of Nuclear Deal Deadline 6.6.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- With less than a month before the deadline for a nuclear deal with Iran, Sens. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.) and Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) filed an amendment to the must-pass defense budget that would extend Congressional sanctions against Iran for 10 additional years. If passed, the amendment would extend the Iran Sanctions Act of 1996 , currently set to expire at the end of 2016, to the end of 2026. Because these sanctions target Iran’s intercontinental ballistic missiles program and support for terrorism -- not its nuclear program -- they would not be part of the sanctions terminated or suspended as part of a nuclear deal between Iran, the U.S. and its five negotiating partners. The proposed sanctions extension threatens to complicate the already delicate negotiations currently taking place around Iran's nuclear program. Under those negotiations, the international community would provide sanctions relief to Iran in exchange for Iran dismantling parts of its nuclear program and limiting others. An ...
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Our DMZ With Mexico 2.6.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Image source: Johannes Barre If you were an endangered red-crowned crane or an increasingly rare pygmy owl, where would you rather nest at night? In the land-mine laden Demilitarized Zone that separates North and South Korea, which former President Bill Clinton once called "the scariest place on earth?" Or in the wide-open spaces surrounding the U.S.-Mexico border, which separates two nominally peaceful neighbors? The answer, sadly, is that the DMZ is by far the better birding bet. Six decades of armed standoff between the two Koreas have made human incursions into the DMZ exceptionally hazardous, which has turned out to be a boon for wildlife. No such luck for the formerly unspoiled lands along our southwest border. There, new border walls, surveillance gear, and off-road patrols have fragmented habitat, triggered floods, and marred previously pristine natural areas, with even more human intrusions planned if members of Congress like Sen. John McCain, R-AZ, have their way. I recently visited the ...
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Pat Toomey Insists He's Not Holding Up A Judicial Nominee He's Holding Up 14.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) insisted Wednesday that he's not blocking one of his own judicial nominees for political reasons -- even as he is still refusing to give the Senate Judiciary Committee the green light to give that nominee a hearing. Toomey has been getting pummeled back home for the Senate's delay in confirming Luis Felipe Restrepo to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit. President Barack Obama nominated Restrepo in November with Toomey's strong support, but the nomination hasn't moved since. In the meantime, the vacancy he would fill has been deemed a "judicial emergency," which means the court is drowning in cases. The Republican senator is being blamed because he hasn't turned in his "blue slip," an indicator to the Judiciary Committee chairman that Toomey is ready to move forward with the nominee. The committee won't move forward on any nominee until it has the blessing of both home-state senators. Sen. Bob Casey (D-Pa.) turned in his blue slip for Restrepo in ...
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GOP Senator Blames Own Party For Being ‘Incredibly Irresponsible' On Highway Funding 13.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) railed against his own party Wednesday for failing to extend funding for the nation’s roads, bridges, and transit systems sooner. "We’re going to kick the can down the road," Corker told reporters at a breakfast hosted by the Christian Science Monitor. "So, incredibly irresponsible, total failure, abdication of leadership, and again, a definition of conservatism is now becoming spending the same of money but just not paying for it." The Highway Trust Fund, which pays for the nation's transportation infrastructure, expires May 31 and both chambers of Congress have yet to offer a plan forward. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) has been in talks with his GOP colleagues for weeks regarding a possible short-term patch for the fund, but the parties have not agreed on a funding source. Other Republicans, like Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.), want to keep pressure on Congress to get a six-year extension of the funding, but again, disagreement on the precise ...
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New border security bill would roll back public lands protections 12.5.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Sen. John McCain's proposal would give Border Patrol more immediate access to sensitive borderlands.
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HUFFPOST HILL - 'Rand Paul Tongue Guy' Now A Thing 12.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Today we learned whether the GOP hates the Obama administration enough to side with Seymour Hersh on something. It might alarm Hersh that his story about a widespread governmental cover-up got as much play as dadbods and a guy licking a camera. And for those of you looking to up your dadbod game, we might suggest a more parsimonious approach than Chris Christie’s office and its $300,000 food budget. This is HUFFPOST HILL for Monday, May 11th, 2015: OBAMA ADMINISTRATION APPROVES ARCTIC OIL SPILL - "The best thing about the Earth is if you poke holes in it oil and gas come out." Kate Sheppard: "The Obama administration on Monday granted conditional approval to Shell to begin exploratory drilling in the Arctic, which the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management said would be 'subject to rigorous safety standards.' The approval will allow Shell Gulf of Mexico, Inc. to begin drilling this summer in the Chukchi Sea, off the northwest coast of Alaska. Shell's drilling plan proposes up to ...
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