User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Regional
Category: Conservation :: Large-Scale
Last updated: Feb 03 2018 01:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Meet the nation’s most endangered national monuments 23.8.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
The fate of some national monuments could become clear this week when Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke concludes his review of 27 national monuments from the South Pacific Ocean to off the coast of New England, as directed by an executive order that President Donald Trump signed this spring.
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Do we have too many national monuments? 4 essential reads 16.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
How might Trump’s administration unmake a monument, and what’s at stake? Experts offer some answers.
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Legal scholars dispute whether monuments are permanent 2.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Courts likely will decide the fate of designations threatened by Trump’s review.
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Outdoor industry flexes political muscle as it leaves Utah 27.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake City • Outdoor recreation industry leaders aren’t going quietly as they stage their last trade show in Utah before moving it to Colorado. As they said goodbye and thank you Wednesday to Salt Lake City for hosting the expo for two decades, some industry leaders also criticized Utah’s Republican leaders for their hard-line opposition to a new national monument and for their efforts to seize control of federal lands. Those issues led the industry to move the twice-yearly expo that generat... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Ex-Interior Secretary calls move to shrink Bears Ears illegal, on ‘the wrong side of history’ 27.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell took sharp aim Wednesday at her successor’s national monument “review,” calling moves to shrink Bears Ears and other designations illegal gestures that puts President Donald Trump on “the wrong side of history” and at odds with what Americans expect for their public lands. Speaking early Wednesday at the Outdoor Retailers final trade show in Salt Lake City, Jewell accused Trump of treating monuments like “contestants on a game show” and Interior Secretary R... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Grand Staircase-Escalante was set up to fail 10.7.2017 High Country News Most Recent
How budget cuts, a divided staff and state politics hamstrung Utah’s biggest monument.
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Old German caves, Poland silver mines make United Nations heritage list 10.7.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
Ancient caves in west Germany with art dating back to the Ice Age and disused silver ore mines in southern Poland were among the sites that a United Nations cultural agency has added to its list of heritage treasures during its current session.
Utah lawsuits to test president’s power to shrink monuments 28.6.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
Native American tribes and environmental groups preparing for a legal battle to stop President Donald Trump from dismantling Utah's new national monument face a tougher challenge than anticipated.
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Op-ed: Young leaders see value in preserving public lands 25.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
At a tenuous moment for young Americans committed to preserving public lands, student leaders across the country can find solace in the words of a president who was the youngest ever elected. President Theodore Roosevelt, a valiant founder of our National Parks system, wrote, “It is not what we have that will make us a great nation; it is the way in which we use it.” Amid a backdrop of rapid industrialization, Roosevelt made a strong case for conservation of the natural world, writing, “We are p...
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Will the next generation of public lands advocates be reached via zip line? Retiring forest service boss Jim Bedwell thinks so 24.6.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
Jim Bedwell saw himself as following trail broken Arthur Carhart, the Forest Service's first landscape architect who birthed the Wilderness Act after a visit to Trappers Lake.
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Letter: Big oil’s interests, and ours 20.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
On Jan. 13, a letter was sent to Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Rep. Rob Bishop, chairpersons of the Senate and House National Resource Committees, respectively. It reads, in part; “The American Petroleum Institute (API) has been monitoring President Obama’s use of the Antiquities Act of 1906 to set aside acreage from development by designating extensive areas of public lands as national monuments. Many of our members explore for and produce oil and natural gas resources on federal offshore and onshore...
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At 87, eco-legend Ken Sleight of Ed Abbey fame is still fighting Lake Powell — but knows it’s a losing battle 20.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Moab • Ensconced at the base of the La Sal Mountains, 15 miles south of Utah’s redrock capital, storied environmentalist Ken Sleight looks out over the landscape of a rich life. Immortalized as Seldom Seen Smith by Edward Abbey in his 1975 anarchist primer “The Monkey Wrench Gang,” Sleight, now 87, ponders the past and future of his beloved Colorado Plateau. He moves a little slower these days and has just undergone surgery to remove cancerous skin cells from his nose. But Sleight’s insights are... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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US Interior chief ‘comfortable’ keeping Maine land public 15.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Staceyville, Maine • U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke praised the beauty of the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument on Wednesday and said he’s “comfortable” with the National Park Service property remaining in public hands. With flies buzzing and Mount Katahdin as a backdrop, Zinke sounded optimistic about the future of special land designation granted by President Barack Obama last summer with a goal of giving an economic jolt to the region. “I’m confident there’s a path forward here ...
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Utah national monument recommendation spurs action 14.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s recommendation to downsize a vast new national monument in Utah created optimism among opponents of 26 other monuments under review around the country and fear among conservation groups that worry he will propose shrinking or rescinding other sites in his final report due in late August. Along the New England coast, commercial fishermen were ecstatic to hear Monday about Zinke’s proposed reduction of the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah and hopeful it foreshad... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Locked out of lands 12.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
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No land-grabbing here 12.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
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Losing their kicks? Funds for Route 66 towns may be at risk 5.6.2017 Denver Post: National News Headlines
Route 66, the historic American roadway that linked Chicago to the West Coast, soon may be dropped from a National Park Service preservation program, which would end years of efforts aimed at reviving old tourist spots in struggling towns.
Bears Ears critics' numbers are misleading: A look at early monument sizes 30.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Bears Ears National Monument critics routinely point to the sprawling reach of President Barack Obama’s proclamation, taking in the swath of canyon country from the San Juan River north to Indian Creek, as the monument’s chief defect. Utah’s legislative leaders and members of Congress say the 1.3 million-acre designation and the 1.7 million acres set aside by President Bill Clinton for Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument are definitive evidence that the presidents “abused” the Antiquitie...
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Bears Ears comments weigh heavily in favor of monument 27.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Commenters on both sides of the Bears Ears National Monument debate say Utah’s Cedar Mesa and surrounding lands should be protected, yet many remarks submitted to the Interior Department reflect intense distrust of monument proponents’ intentions. Anti-monument locals such as Ted Powell fear the 1.3 million-acre designation’s real aim is to turn the region into a playground for outdoor recreation at the expense of families that have lived in San Juan County for generations. “They want to contro... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Friends of the Yampa: Attack on 1 monument is attack on all 12.5.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Many of you know Friends of the Yampa as the local nonprofit that strives to protect and enhance the environmental and recreational integrity of the Yampa River through stewardship, advocacy, education and partnerships. Friends of the Yampa is expanding our advocacy as part of a broader coalition of friends groups with a common goal: bringing attention to the importance of our nation’s public lands. Public lands and waters are a critical part of the U.S. economy, particularly in Colorado. Outdoor recreation has generated $887 billion in consumer spending nationwide, supporting 7.6 million jobs each year and allowing U.S. citizens multiple opportunities to enjoy the best that nature has to offer. In 2016, our National Parks saw record visitation. Studies have shown that regions surrounding national monuments have seen growth in employment and income. Dinosaur National Monument alone generated over $20 million for surrounding communities in 2016 and supported 244 local jobs. Protected public lands not only ...
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