User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-National
Category: Land Management :: Mining
Last updated: May 29 2017 05:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How Glenn Danzig got thousands of people to trek to the Orange County wilderness 29.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary

“Moderate” is not the first word anyone would use to describe Glenn Danzig.

As frontman of the long-running hard-rock band that bears his last name, the 61-year-old singer toggles between a tender croon and a dramatic bellow. As a songwriter, he revels in gruesome imagery of skulls and demons.

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Coal trains fewer as Appalachian railroads keep rolling 28.5.2017 AP National
MATOAKA, W.Va. (AP) -- The red caboose parked at the edge of a rundown commercial block is the only rail car some people have seen in Matoaka in more than a year....
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Op-ed: Utah politicians fall behind their own license plates 28.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
State departments of motor vehicles are often maligned for being behind the times, but in Utah, they seem to be nearly a century ahead of the politicians. The Utah DMV was truly prescient in 1942 when the Utah license plate proudly proclaimed Utah as the “Center Scenic America.” The first Utah chairlift had started spinning a few years earlier at Alta, but the economy was still centered around agriculture and mining. At that time, Park City and the Cottonwood canyons were still active mining a...
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Op-ed: Coal mining in Grand Staircase makes no sense 28.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
It does not make economic sense to open up the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument to coal mining — which would be a possibility if the monument boundary is redrawn. I have spent my career performing feasibility studies on coal mining projects around the world since I arrived in Utah 40 years ago. There is a time and place to develop a virgin coal project. This is neither the time nor the place. The coal deposit is in a high desert and very remote part of southern Utah with no paved road...
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These Stunning Photos Show the Real Cost of a Pipeline 27.5.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Reveal and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. As police in riot gear swept the last protesters from camps near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in late February, two dozen men and women arrived in this small ranching and lumber town 1,200 miles to the northwest. They were armed with maps, posters, doughnuts and coffee, and hoped to sell locals on an oil pipeline—one larger and potentially more hazardous than the Dakota Access. They wore its name on their matching green jackets: Trans Mountain. Town officials were already on board. They had signed on in exchange for about $330,000 (420,000 Canadian dollars) from the pipeline's American owner, Kinder Morgan Inc. But a few miles downriver, the Lower Nicola Indian Band was putting the company's offer to a vote the following day. The 14 other First Nations directly on the pipeline route already had agreed to welcome crews onto their reserves in exchange for money and jobs from the company. ...
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Study on proposed mining ban near Boundary Waters will proceed 26.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Trump administration officials speaking at a congressional hearing Thursday said a two-year environmental review of potential copper nickel mining on the Superior National Forest will go forward, despite efforts to block it.
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How Donald Trump can save the planet and make himself look good 18.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary

To the editor: I am so grateful to The Times Editorial Board for its thoughtful and reasoned opinions regarding President Trump and his administration’s impact on us all. I fear that Trump will be remembered as the leader who failed to save us from ecological disaster. (“Trump hasn't destroyed...

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Brazil’s lower house OKs reducing protection in Amazon park 18.5.2017 Washington Post: World
Brazil’s lower house of Congress has approved a measure significantly reducing the size of a fully protected national park in the Amazon rain forest and opening up a big chunk of land for agriculture and other activities.
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Cristina Harmon: Protect our national monuments 18.5.2017 Steamboat Pilot
While the current review of 27 national monuments initiated by the Trump Administration appears to be a broad effort to involve the public in commenting on and possibly rescinding some of the designations, it is clear to me and many others following the process that the true nature of all this political posturing is to satisfy a loud and unhappy Republican Congressional delegation. Rather than touring and reviewing all 27 of the National Monuments created since 1996, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke traveled directly to Utah to view the recently created Bears Ears National Monument and the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument created in 1996 by President Bill Clinton. (Parenthetically, the Denver Post has reported that Secretary Zinke has assured Governor Hickenlooper that these “reviews” will not impact national monuments in Colorado.) The Utah delegation has long been unhappy with the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument since its creation in 1996, claiming it was a federal takeover and ...
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Here are a few of the potential conflicts a key Interior Department nominee may face 17.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary
A quick look at David Bernhardt, an Interior Department nominee who could have potential conflicts of interest in several departments reporting to him
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School district pulls suicide book 'Thirteen Reasons Why' 17.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Denver • As a Colorado community mourns the loss of seven students who recently killed themselves, a school district official ordered librarians to temporarily stop circulating a book that’s the basis for Netflix’s popular new series “13 Reasons Why,” which some critics say romanticizes suicide. The order rankled some librarians who called it censorship, and it appears to be a rare instance in which the book has been removed from circulation — albeit briefly. It also has highlighted the debate a...
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Trump will have to navigate diplomatic land mines abroad. Here’s how he’s preparing. 16.5.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Despite some distractions, policy experts are briefing the president on foreign affairs.
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Trump hasn't destroyed the environment — yet. So the fight is on 15.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary

If there’s a silver lining to the toxic cloud hovering over the White House, it’s that our science-denying president hasn’t caused too much damage to the environment. Yet.

But nearly four months into the Trump administration, the risks to the nation’s air, land and water are large and looming,...

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Should Trump Eliminate These Beautiful National Monuments? Here's Your Chance to Weigh In. 13.5.2017 Mother Jones
Up to 27 national monuments could be at risk as the Trump administration embarks on an unprecedented endeavor to roll back protections for public lands. President Donald Trump signed an executive order in late April asking the Department of Interior to give him recommendations for which monuments he should target. All of the monuments potentially on the chopping block are larger than 100,000 acres and were created after 1996—a date chosen to include the Grand Staircase-Escalante monument that's unpopular among some Utah residents . It's unclear exactly what Trump intends to do with those recommendations, which are due in August. The 1906 Antiquities Act gives the president broad powers to create new national monuments, which typically protects the land or water from new mining leases. The law has never been used to roll back a predecessor's monument. If Trump decides to eliminate or shrink any of these monuments via executive order, they would likely remain federal lands managed, but more acreage could ...
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South America's indigenous groups used to line up with the left. Not anymore. 12.5.2017 Washington Post
South America's indigenous groups used to line up with the left. Not anymore.
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Coalition: IS town fall 'victory' for Syria Kurdish partner 11.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Beirut • The capture of a key Syrian town and a nearby dam from Islamic State group militants by Syrian Kurdish-led forces undermines the IS’s ability to defend its de facto capital, Raqqa and disrupts its ability to plan attacks in Western countries, the U.S.-led international coalition said Thursday. Tabqa and the nearby dam, Syria’s largest, were seized a day earlier in an offensive that lasted nearly seven weeks, with the backing of airstrikes from the international coalition. The Kurdish-le...
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Peat moss: Good for plants but bad for the planet? 11.5.2017 Washington Post
Peat moss: Good for plants but bad for the planet?
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Trump takes aim at monuments with oil riches 11.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Bears Ears National Monument in Utah boasts stretches of red-and-yellow sandstone so brilliant they appear to be ablaze and rock structures so precarious they appear to defy gravity. The rugged terrain south of the Colorado River also has reserves of oil and natural gas that are currently off limits to new leasing — restrictions that may end as the Trump administration reviews 27 large-scale monuments his predecessors set aside for protection. Industry groups and Republican lawmakers have praise... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Bianca Jagger: Stop The Murder Of Environmental Defenders In Latin America 10.5.2017 Huffpolitics on The Huffington Post
Bianca Jagger: Stop The Murder Of Environmental Defenders In Latin America
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Indian authorities harass tribal leaders 10.5.2017 Survival International
The Dongria have resisted attempts to mine in their hills for years, but are facing serious pressure to give in © Survival The Indian government is harassing and attempting to silence the leaders of the Dongria Kondh tribe, famous for winning a “David and Goliath” court battle against a British mining giant. The Dongria’s resistance to mining on their lands has continued since their landmark victory in 2014. Leaders including Dodi Pusika feel that the risk of mining remains as long as a refinery is operational at the foot of the Niyamgiri hills, an area which the tribe have been dependent on and managed for generations. A recent protest at the refinery was met with a baton-charge from police. Pusika’s daughter-in-law, Kuni Sikaka, was arrested in the middle of the night of May 3 and accused of links with armed Maoist rebels. In exchange for her release, Dodi Pusika and other members of his family were made to “surrender” as Maoists and paraded in front of the media. There has been an alarming increase in ...
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