User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-National
Category: Conservation :: Small-Scale
Last updated: Dec 26 2018 20:09 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Racist Policies in Urban Neighborhoods Have Created Deadly “Heat Islands” 20.1.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in The Guardian and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Deadly urban heatwaves disproportionately affect underserved neighborhoods because of the legacy of racist housing policies which have denied African Americans home ownership and basic public services, a landmark new study has found. Extreme heat kills hundreds of people in […]
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Boulder County’s populations of native bird species decline in the face of development 12.1.2020 Denver Post: Local
The Northern Hemisphere lost 3 billion birds, or 29% of the overall population, in the last 50 years. While the warming climate has played a demonstrative role in this decline – and will continue to do so with ever-increasing power – ornithologists in Boulder County have pointed to urban sprawl as a more immediate threat to the survival of the area’s native bird populations, without which local ecosystems cannot properly function, adding to the affects of climate change.
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How to prevent city climate action from becoming 'green gentrification' 3.1.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Why it's important for cities tackling climate change to engage with frontline communities.
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Denver’s Giving Machines raise $625,000, “exceeding expectations” in first-year test run 2.1.2020 Headlines: All Headlines
They look like vending machines; you swipe your credit card, look through the glass to pick an item; and then you choose. But it’s not candy or a toy you’re choosing -- it's a donation to a charity.
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Desire to safeguard vacant land in Golden could cost taxpayers up to $5 million 16.12.2019 Denver Post: News: Local
A recently launched citizen petition designed to keep a prominent and picturesque parcel of land on the western fringe of the metro area free of commercial development could cost taxpayers up to $5 million as part of a legal showdown over property rights.
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How to Prevent City Climate Action from Becoming “Green Gentrification” 14.12.2019 THE CITY FIX
When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans 14 years ago, hundreds of thousands of people lost their jobs, homes and possessions. But some people were hit harder than others. Nearly two-thirds of jobs lost after the hurricane were lost by women, and ...
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How to Prevent City Climate Action from Becoming "Green Gentrification" 12.12.2019 WRI Stories
How to Prevent City Climate Action from Becoming "Green Gentrification" Comments|Add Comment|PrintGowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York. Photo by Robert Wolcheck/Flickr When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans 14 years ago, hundreds of thousands of people lost their jobs, homes and possessions. But some people were hit harder than others. Nearly two-thirds of jobs lost after the hurricane were lost by women, and nearly 80 percent of the population of flooded neighborhoods were people of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Policy News: December 3, 2019 4.12.2019 EcoTone
The Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award Applications are now being accepted. ESA is now accepting applications for its 2020 Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award. Offered each year, this award gives graduate students an all-expense paid trip to Washington, DC for science policy training with opportunities to meet with lawmakers on Capitol ...
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Park Hill Golf Course: Denver agrees to pay developer $6 million settlement, but land’s future still unclear 5.11.2019 Denver Post: All Political News
Denver city officials teed up a $6 million settlement Tuesday with the buyer of Park Hill Golf Course, but the agreement doesn't resolve questions about what might happen to the land.
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Boulder County’s carbon sequestration project reports limited impact in first year 27.10.2019 Headlines: All Headlines
“People are going to have to be patient, it’s going to take a long time to figure this out,” said Elizabeth Black, head of the Citizen Science Soil Health Project that analyzes soil samples from all over Boulder, Larimer and Weld counties. “Climate change is really scaring people and they want a solution. When they hear about soil carbon sequestration there is this tendency for people to say this is great, farmers are going to fix this. That is not fair or realistic. Everybody has to do their part. People in cities need to figure out what they’re going to do to fix it on their end, too.”
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Policy News: October 21, 2019 21.10.2019 EcoTone
In This Issue: House Natural Resources Committee Considers Bills to Boost Funding for Conservation, Create Wildlife Corridors Bill would provide $1.4 billion in dedicated funding. Congress House Science Committee advances scientific integrity legislation. Executive Branch Draft Environmental Impact Statement exempts the Tongass National Forest from 2001 Roadless Rule. Courts Federal judge blocks the implementation of ...
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Retrofitting busy highways, like U.S. Highway 285 in Colorado, to let wildlife travel safely, too 14.10.2019 Denver Post: Local
U.S. Highway 285 was once a death zone for the dwindling herds of elk and mule deer on Colorado’s Western Slope. But today it offers a lifeline, helping them travel from their summer range high in the mountains to winter foraging grounds along the Arkansas River.
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In Gorakhpur, India, Citizens Use Nature to Prevent Floods 9.10.2019 WRI Stories
In Gorakhpur, India, Citizens Use Nature to Prevent Floods Comments|Add Comment|PrintWaterlogged housing in Gorakhpur, India. Photo credit: Anna Brown Monsoon season has always brought torrential downpours to Gorakhpur, India, but the city has seen record-breaking rainfall in the last few years. Residents of the northern Indian city often find their streets submerged in water, their houses waterlogged. Stagnant floodwaters have made Gorakhpur a hub for diseases such as dengue fever, malaria and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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In Gorakhpur, India, Citizens Use Nature to Rein in Floods 9.10.2019 THE CITY FIX
Monsoon season has always brought torrential downpours to Gorakhpur, India, but the city has seen record-breaking rainfall in the last few years. Residents of the northern Indian city often find their streets submerged in water, their houses waterlogged. Stagnant floodwaters ...
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Lumber Salvaged from Baltimore’s Row Houses and City Trees Creates Jobs and Cuts Wood Waste 5.10.2019 THE CITY FIX
Baltimore, like many post-industrial cities, confronts novel challenges. Once the sixth largest city in the U.S., Baltimore’s population has contracted by more than a third, resulting from a complex suite of factors including job loss, economic decline, and discriminatory policies or housing and lending ...
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Lumber Salvaged from Baltimore’s Row Houses and City Trees Creates Jobs and Cuts Wood Waste 4.10.2019 WRI Stories
Lumber Salvaged from Baltimore’s Row Houses and City Trees Creates Jobs and Cuts Wood Waste Comments|Add Comment|PrintUrban trees in Baltimore’s Mount Vernon neighborhood. Photo by Paul Gardner/Flickr Like many post-industrial cities, Baltimore faces a variety of challenges. Once the sixth largest city in the U.S., Baltimore’s population has contracted by over a third as a result of a complex suite of factors including job loss, economic decline, discriminatory housing and lending practices and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Can protecting land promote employment? 4.10.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
In New England, the answer is yes.
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Park Hill Golf Club: Get ready for another Denver development debate 2.10.2019 Denver Post: News: Local
The city of Denver is ready to end the legal conflicts that have ensnared a valuable piece of property in the city's northeast. But a proposed settlement may only be the beginning of a long and contentious political fight over the future of the Park Hill Golf Club.
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A nomadic plumber found mysterious stones on his land — so he became the first person to return land to the Ute Indian Tribe 13.9.2019 Headlines: All Headlines
Rich Snyder is the first person in recent memory to give land as a form of reparations for the Ute Indian Tribe. It cost him almost everything.
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Extreme heat is a growing business risk 13.9.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
There are 20 times more deaths caused by rising temperatures than by hurricanes. It's time to design communities with that in mind.
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