User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-National
Category: Land Management :: Forestry
Last updated: Oct 24 2020 03:29 IST RSS 2.0
 
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It's Time to Invest in Ethiopia's Forest Sector 23.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print In Tigray, people are growing trees to restore the country’s forests. Photo by Aron Simeneh/WRI A version of this blog first appeared in The Reporter . To learn more about the economic potential of Ethiopia’s forest sector, read the new report Trees, Forests and Profits in Ethiopia . Billions of bees are hard at work in Kaffa, producing honey and beeswax for a business that employs 3,500 people. Another company in Addis Ababa harvests bamboo to build furniture, contributing $2.6 million (91 million birr) to the national economy. Together, forest products like these, grown by businesses and communities, add more than $2.6 billion (91 billion birr) to Ethiopia’s GDP. It’s clear that trees are crucial to the future of Ethiopia, but forest cover has fallen to 15.7% today from 40% two centuries ago. That devastation, though, isn’t irreversible. Local communities have grown millions of trees and bamboo clusters since the 1980s to restore their farms, forests and pasture. For decades, the yearly soil and ...
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Bringing New Life to Fallen Urban Trees 23.10.2020 THE CITY FIX
Editor’s note: The Reforestation Hubs initiative is offering pro-bono technical support to a select group of local governments and NGO partners in the United States. Interested cities and NGOs can submit a letter of interest by October 30, 2020 here. The ...
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Bringing New Life to Fallen Urban Trees 22.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print If a tree falls in a city, where does it go? Reforestation hubs can offer new and beneficial answers to this question. Photo by Tobias Freeman/Unsplash Editor’s note: The Reforestation Hubs initiative is offering pro-bono technical support to a select group of local governments and NGO partners. Interested cities and NGOs can submit a letter of interest by October 30, 2020 here . The city is a difficult place for a tree to survive. Compared to their counterparts in the countryside, urban trees generally get less water, suffer more intense heat, compete for space with unyielding infrastructure and frequently become riddled with disease and pests. As a result, many cities are stuck with a lot of dead trees every year. Cities and private contractors cut them down and usually turn them into firewood, mulch or haul them to the landfill. Often, cities replant fewer trees than they remove, leading to a net loss in canopy cover over time. However, these trees don’t have to go to waste. “ Reforestation hubs ...
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Love trees? Prioritize wildfire restoration and fighting deforestation 22.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Love trees? Prioritize wildfire restoration and fighting deforestation Heather Clancy Thu, 10/22/2020 - 02:00 Back in my former life as a tech journo, my coverage was informed by the infamous " hype cycle " phrase coined by research firm Gartner to describe the arc of emerging technology adoption from the spark of innovation to mainstream adoption. Lately, I’ve been mulling that framework a great deal in the context of a much-ballyhooed nature-based solution for removing carbon emissions: planting trees. Heck, even the climate-denier-in-chief loves the idea . Right now, we are clearly in the "peak of inflated expectations" phase of the tree-planting movement, with new declarations hitting my inbox every week. Pretty much any company with a net-zero commitment has placed tree projects at the center of its short-term strategy, often as part of declarations related to the Trillion Trees initiative.   As a verified tree-hugger, I’m encouraged. But, please, it’s time to refine the dialogue: While ...
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Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South 21.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South Danielle Purifoy Wed, 10/21/2020 - 00:45 This story was originally published by Southerly , in partnership with Scalawag and Environmental Health News for its Powerlines series, which looks at climate change, justice, and infrastructure in the American South. The series is supported by the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University, and is part of their  POWER project .  In 2013, when Enviva Biomass opened a new plant near Belinda Joyner’s community in Northampton County, North Carolina, she already knew what to expect. As the Northeast Organizer for  Clean Water for North Carolina , she’d met with residents of a small, majority Black town called Ahoskie, 40 miles from her home. Enviva had built its  first North Carolina plant  there two years before.  The corporation, which manufactures wood pellets as a purportedly renewable alternative to coal, did what most industries do in ...
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What Regenerative Farming Can Do for the Climate 7.10.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

Tropical Storm Isaias downed power lines and trees across the greater New York City area in early August, snapping limbs from the ancient oaks that ring Patty Gentry’s small Long Island farm. Dead branches were still dangling a month later. But rows of mustard greens were unfurling nearby, and a thicket of green vines reached toward the sun, dotted with tangy orange bulbs.

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Late freeze shortens fall harvest for Indiana apple orchards 6.10.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
During what would normally be primetime for Midwest apple-picking, orchards around Indiana are running out of apples early this season following a late spring freeze that obliterated much of the state’s crop.
Green Space: An Underestimated Tool to Create More Equal Cities 5.10.2020 THE CITY FIX
As coronavirus restrictions ease around the world, many consider a walk around their neighborhood for some fresh air to be a welcome break from confinement. However, socioeconomic status could greatly affect the landscapes people find on these strolls, particularly in how much ...
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The Road to Restoration: 3 Steps For Transforming Landscapes 1.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print Proper planning when restoring landscapes can bring new opportunities for people living on the land. Photo by the Ministry of Environment of Panama/Initiative 20x20 Restoring degraded landscapes can bring water, food and income to local people while safeguarding the environment. But if communities, companies and governments rush the land restoration process, there can be unintended consequences. Examples of the negative effects of attempts to restore landscapes include campaigns that plant trees in the wrong places and large projects that violate the rights of the people living on the land or ignore gender, class and other social differences. With proper planning, though, government restoration pledges to the Bonn Challenge , AFR100 and Initiative 20x20 can turn into high-impact work that provides new opportunities for people living in the landscape and the natural environment. What does “proper planning” look like, though? How can the land be restored effectively? Every landscape and country is ...
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Green Space: An Underestimated Tool to Create More Equal Cities 30.9.2020 WRI Stories
Print A walk in the park might seem like a small thing, but green spaces can play a huge role in building equitable cities. Photo by Ignascio Brosa/Unsplash As coronavirus restrictions ease around the world, many consider a walk around their neighborhood for some fresh air to be a welcome break from confinement. However, socioeconomic status could greatly affect the landscapes people find on these strolls, particularly in how much green they are likely to see. The gaps between the haves and the have-nots in cities across the world are visible from space, illuminated by tree canopy. San Francisco’s Urban Forestry Plan , for example, notes that tree canopy varies widely depending on the relative wealth of different communities. The ritzy villas in the Seacliff neighborhood enjoy a leafy 30% canopy cover, while historically lower-income and immigrant communities in the Mission and Outer Sunset neighborhoods have a scant 7.5% and 5% tree canopy cover, respectively. The correlation between urban tree cover ...
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Op-Ed: Don't believe self-serving messengers. Logging will not prevent destructive wildfires 29.9.2020 LA Times: Opinion

Logging bills, like the one introduced by Sen. Feinstein, are being promoted as solutions. But removing trees could actually make wildfires worse.

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Young Forests Capture Carbon Quicker than Previously Thought 23.9.2020 WRI Stories
Young Forests Capture Carbon Quicker than Previously Thought Comments|Add Comment|PrintNew research finds that letting forests regrow naturally can absorb 23% of the world's CO2 emissions every year. Photo by Tobias Wrzal/Flickr */ There’s increasing recognition of how nature can help tackle the climate crisis. From protecting standing forests to planting new trees, forests offer significant climate mitigation benefits. Now, new research shows that letting forests regrow on their own could... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Amid devastating forest fires, One Trillion Trees movement puts down U.S. roots 27.8.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Amid devastating forest fires, One Trillion Trees movement puts down U.S. roots Heather Clancy Thu, 08/27/2020 - 00:02 This week marks the launch of the first regional chapter of the ambitious global movement to plant 1 trillion trees  — a natural climate solution seen as critical for helping draw down the earth's carbon debt, and an idea that has been spreading like wildfire since it was planted in January in Davos, Switzerland. There are more than two dozen launch partners for the new U.S. branch of 1t.org, spearheaded by the World Economic Forum and American Forests. Collectively, the group — which includes tech giants Microsoft and Salesforce, consumer products companies Timberland and Clif Bar, financial services powerhouses Bank of America and Mastercard and the cities of Detroit and Dallas — hopes to grow more than 855 million trees covering 2.8 million acres. It's a bold goal, especially poignant in the context of the devastating forest fires raging in California, which have claimed more than 1.2 ...
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Investors say agroforestry isn’t just climate friendly — it’s profitable 10.8.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Sid Brantley/U.S. National Agroforestry Center Close Authorship Traditional livestock farming, for instance, is carbon intensive. Trees are cut down for pasture, fossil fuels are used as fertilizer for feed, and that feed is transported across borders, and sometimes the world, using even more fossil fuels. Livestock raised in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), produce more methane than cows that graze on grass. A silvopasture system, on the other hand, involves planting trees in pastures — or at least not cutting them down. Farmers rotate livestock from place to place, allowing soil to hold onto more carbon. There are similar benefits to other types of agroforestry practices. Forest farming, for instance, involves growing a variety of crops under a forest canopy — a process that can improve biodiversity and soil quality, and also support the root systems and carbon sequestration potential of farms. A changing debate Etelle Higonnet, senior campaign director at campaign group Mighty Earth, ...
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Planting tiny urban forests can boost biodiversity and fight climate change 7.8.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Planting tiny urban forests can boost biodiversity and fight climate change Alex Thornton Fri, 08/07/2020 - 00:30 How much space do you think you need to grow a forest? If your answer is bigger than a couple of tennis courts, think again. Miniature forests are springing up on patches of land in urban areas around the world, often planted by local community groups  using a method inspired by Japanese temples. The idea is simple — take brownfield sites, plant them densely with a wide variety of native seedlings and let them grow with minimal intervention. The result, according to the method’s proponents , is complex ecosystems perfectly suited to local conditions that improve biodiversity, grow quickly and absorb more carbon dioxide. The Miyawaki method The method is based on the work of Japanese botanist Akira Miyawaki . He found that protected areas around temples, shrines and cemeteries in Japan contained a huge variety of native vegetation that co-existed to produce resilient and diverse ecosystems. ...
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Amid Pine Mountain's ancient trees, a forest 'thinning' project triggers protests 1.8.2020 LA Times: Environment

Environmentalists and local leaders oppose a federal plan to thin trees from a scenic spot deep inside Los Padres National Forest.

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The Challenge of Tracking How a Trillion Trees Grow 30.7.2020 WRI Stories
The Challenge of Tracking How a Trillion Trees Grow Comments|Add Comment|PrintIn Kenya, people are growing trees. Now, it’s time to track them. Photo by Aaron Minnick/WRI. This was the year that business added its clout to the global effort to add trillions of trees to the arsenal of weapons against climate change. The goal is to use these trees to restore land and absorb climate-warming carbon out of the atmosphere, which could keep global warming below 1.5 degrees C (2.7 degrees F), the level... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Brooklyn Bridge Could Be a Landmark for Forest Conservation 24.7.2020 THE CITY FIX
The Brooklyn Bridge, with its distinctive gothic towers and cable-bound span, is one of the most recognizable landmarks in the world. It features in countless films, photographs, books and TV shows. It even has its own idiom in American parlance ...
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Brooklyn Bridge Could Be a Landmark for Forest Conservation 24.7.2020 WRI Stories
Brooklyn Bridge Could Be a Landmark for Forest Conservation Comments|Add Comment|PrintRendering of the proposed Brooklyn Bridge Forest. Photo by Pilot Projects Design Collective The Brooklyn Bridge, with its distinctive gothic towers and cable-bound span, is one of the most recognizable landmarks in the world. It features in countless films, photographs, books and TV shows. It even has its own idiom in American parlance – when someone is “selling you the Brooklyn Bridge,” they are offering you... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Samples from downed trees near Snowmass will aid research of historic avalanche cycle 18.7.2020 Denver Post: Local
Mike Cooperstein and Jason Konigsberg maneuvered a 6-foot long cross-cut saw with menacing teeth into position Tuesday on a hulking spruce trunk that was ripped out of the ground by an avalanche in March 2019.
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