User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-National
Category: Places :: Native American Lands
Last updated: Jun 15 2017 01:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,564    
Bill clears U.S. hurdle to expand Amber Alerts in tribal lands 15.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Albuquerque, N.M. • Federal legislation to expand the Amber Alert child abduction emergency notification system in Native American communities across the country has cleared its last hurdle before heading to the full U.S. Senate for consideration. The legislation is in response to the 2016 deadly abduction of 11-year-old Ashlynne Mike on the Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian reservation in the U.S. The high profile case raised questions about gaps in communication and coordination betwe... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Indigenous Advocates Call On UN To Make Cultural Appropriation Illegal 14.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Indigenous advocates from around the world have reportedly recommended to a specialized United Nations committee to make cultural appropriation of indigenous peoples illegal as an international standard. The specialized committee, which is a part of the U.N.’s World Intellectual Property Organization, discussed the issue when members met in Geneva, Switzerland,  this week , the Canadian Broadcasting Company reported Tuesday. They were discussing the committee’s progress, its future work and the renewal of the committee’s mandate . Delegates from 189 countries that sit on the committee have been working since 2001 on  creating text-based negotiations that protect the traditional knowledge, cultural expressions and genetic resources as intellectual property of indigenous peoples and to prevent misappropriation of these properties. In a presentation to the committee on Monday, James Anaya , dean of law at the University of Colorado, said the negotiations that the committee had created should “obligate” ...
Also found in: [+]
Navajo Nation panel backs lease change for coal power plant 6.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Window Rock, Ariz. • A Navajo Nation Council committee has endorsed tribal legislation to extend the lease on a coal-fired power plant in northern Arizona so it can operate through 2019 and preserve jobs held by Native Americans. Tribal officials say the Health, Education and Human Services Committee voted 2-1 for the legislation on the Navajo Generating Station during a special meeting Monday. Two other committees will consider the legislation before it is considered by the full council. The ow... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
U.S. senator suggests reforms for Navajo housing authority 4.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Albuquerque, , N.M. • The findings of an investigation initiated by a U.S. senator into the spending of federal housing grants on the nation’s largest American Indian reservation suggest mismanagement resulted in cost overruns and delays. Top Navajo Nation officials in a statement issued late Thursday detailed the findings along with numerous recommendations made by Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona. The recommendations include reducing the federal government’s allocation to the tribe for n...
Also found in: [+]
Report: Poor roads on tribal lands lead to school absences 23.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

PHOENIX (AP) — The federal government released a report Monday that casts a critical light on the poor conditions of roads on tribal lands nationwide, highlighting the widespread challenge of getting Native American children to school during bad weather. The General Accounting Office sent a team to visit 10 different school districts on three reservations […]
Also found in: [+]
40% of Utah/Arizona Navajo Reservation residents still have no running water 23.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Monument Valley, Ariz. • On the outskirts of Monument Valley, touching the Arizona-Utah border, a water well is encased in a brick building behind a barb-wired fence. A few cattle graze nearby, mooing to occasionally pierce the quiet. Residents say the well is one of two in the area, a couple miles from a small town on the Navajo Reservation. One well is a direct line to hotels. This one, leading to a one-spigot watering hole a few miles away, is the main water supply for about 900 people living...
Also found in: [+]
Navajo Nation reservation in need of running water 21.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Monument Valley, Ariz. • On the outskirts of Monument Valley, touching the Arizona-Utah border, a water well is encased in a brick building behind a barb-wired fence. A few cattle graze nearby, mooing to occasionally pierce the quiet. Residents say the well is one of two in the area, a couple miles from a small town on the Navajo Reservation. One well is a direct line to hotels. This one, leading to a one-spigot watering hole a few miles away, is the main water supply for about 900 people living...
Also found in: [+]
Letter: Bishop ignores views of the tribes 11.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The Utah delegation manipulated the president into signing an aggressive executive order demanding review of our recently proclaimed large national monuments. Sen. Orrin Hatch was “relentless,” in the president’s words. Citizens must be equally relentless in defense of these remarkable places. Rep. Rob Bishop’s contribution to this campaign of misinformation is jaw-dropping. In The Tribune (May 3), he says of Bears Ears: “No local tribe in San Juan County, Utah, supported this designation.” Bish...
Also found in: [+]
With National Monuments Under Review, Bears Ears Is Focus Of Fierce Debate 6.5.2017 NPR News
Bears Ears in Utah is on land considered sacred to Native Americans. But some local residents say the 1.35-million-acre national monument is being pushed by extreme out-of-state environmentalists.
Also found in: [+]
Tribal Leaders Vow To Sue If Trump Rescinds Bears Ears Monument 4.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — Feeling left out of the conversation, members of the  Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition  — a group of five Native American tribes that co-manages Utah’s Bears Ears National monument — traveled to Washington, D.C. to demand the Trump administration’s attention. And if forced, they vowed to wage a legal battle against the federal government to protect their sacred lands. When President Donald Trump  signed an executive order last week calling for a review of at least two dozen U.S. monument designations , he said he had “heard a lot about”  Bears Ears  and how “beautiful” the area is. The Obama-era designation of the 1.35 million-acre monument in southeastern Utah, Trump boasted, “should never have happened” and was made “over the profound objections” of the state’s citizens. Considering his information is coming  directly from Utah’s Republican congressional delegation , which fiercely opposes the monument, Trump’s comments came as little surprise. What native tribal leaders made perfectly ...
Also found in: [+]
Man pleads not guilty in shooting death of Navajo officer 21.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Albuquerque, N.M. • The man accused of gunning down a tribal police officer in a remote corner of the nation’s largest American Indian reservation pleaded not guilty Thursday to several charges, including murder. Kirby Cleveland, 32, will remain in federal custody pending trial, which has yet to be scheduled. He faces murder and weapons charges in the killing of Navajo Nation Officer Houston James Largo, who was shot March 11 on a dark road in western New Mexico while responding to a domestic vi...
Also found in: [+]
On the Navajo Nation, special ed students await water that doesn't stink 13.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Fundraising is underway for a new filtration system at an Arizona school for Navajo children with disabilities. Now, the water runs black and smells like rotten eggs, but is technically safe to drink.
Also found in: [+]
On The Navajo Nation, Special Ed Students Await Water That's Doesn't Stink 13.4.2017 NPR News
Fundraising is underway for a new filtration system at an Arizona school for Navajo children with disabilities. Now, the water runs black and smells like rotten eggs, but is technically safe to drink.
Also found in: [+]
Navajo Nation police, prosecutors push for safety fund 10.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Gallup, N.M. • Law enforcement agents and prosecutors on the Navajo Nation have joined forces to advocate for the creation of a public safety fund to help deal with an increase in violent crime. The Gallup Independent reports (http://bit.ly/1lKttWL) authorities say criminals have been getting more aggressive and do not fear prosecution because they are aware of the shortage of police officers, prosecutors and judges. The public safety fund would help hire more people to fill these positions. The...
Also found in: [+]
Tribe could lose $28 million annually if power plant closed 7.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Gallup, N.M. • Officials say the Navajo Nation could lose more than $28 million a year in revenue if the Navajo Generating Station is allowed to close. The Gallup Independent reports (http://bit.ly/1hoDjlp ) that according to a Friday memo from the Navajo Nation Officer of the Controller, if the coal-fired power plant closes, the tribe could lose a projected revenue of $28.1 million. Owners of the generating station have voted to close it, saying it is not currently profitable. It is unclear whe...
Also found in: [+]
Losses from Colorado spill may be less than feared 4.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Denver • Economic damage from a Colorado mine waste spill caused by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency might be far less than originally feared after attorneys drastically reduced some of the larger claims, The Associated Press has learned. Farmers, business owners, residents and others initially said they suffered $1.2 billion in lost income, property damage and personal injuries from the 2015 spill at the Gold King Mine, which tainted rivers in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah. But the tota... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Losses from Colorado mine spill may be less than feared 4.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Denver • Economic damage from a Colorado mine waste spill caused by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency might be far less than originally feared after attorneys drastically reduced some of the larger claims, The Associated Press has learned. Farmers, business owners, residents and others initially said they suffered $1.2 billion in lost income, property damage and personal injuries from the 2015 spill at the Gold King Mine, which tainted rivers in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah. But the tota...
Also found in: [+]
Complaint: Man charged with killing Navajo officer was drunk 22.3.2017 AP National
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) -- A man charged with killing a Navajo Nation police officer who was responding to a domestic violence call had been drinking and was intoxicated the night of the shooting, according to a criminal complaint released Tuesday....
Also found in: [+]
Fallen Navajo officer called fearless, hilarious at service 17.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Since he was a young boy, Houston James Largo had dreams of one day wearing a uniform and a badge and helping communities on the nation’s largest American Indian reservation, where he grew up. There were tears, laughter and ovations as speakers shared stories Thursday at an emotional funeral service for the decorated 27-year-old officer, […]
Also found in: [+]
Navajo officer’s death reflects dangers for tribal officers 16.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

"The violence we are seeing is showing our officers are not only stretched thin, but they also are facing challenges with the vastness of the area," says a Navajo Nation legislator.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 1,564