User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Recreation :: Motorized Recreation
Last updated: Dec 19 2018 16:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Allowing off-highway vehicles in Utah’s national parks is a mistake 18.10.2019 High Country News Most Recent
More mechanized traffic in already crowded parks is another Trump administration gift to industry and Utah politicians.
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Hiking trails are a path to destruction for Colorado elk 27.8.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Recreationalists in Vail are having a devastating impact on the local herd.
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Wreckreation; snowmobile danger; a subdued vacuum 29.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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Hunting faces an ethical reckoning 18.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Gruesome social media videos show how far modern hunting has drifted from its roots.
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How to turn motorized rec into a sustainable economy 12.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
In 2010, Challis, Idaho, created a trail for ATV riders. Now, it’s enjoying an economic boost.
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Too many motors 18.9.2017 Current Issue
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The thru-hike you’ve never heard of: Oregon Desert Trail 30.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Photographer Meg Roussos shares views from her solo-trek deep in the backcountry.
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Sage grouse review; false coal stats; elk deaths 26.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
HCN.org news in brief.
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Enviros and BLM reach major public lands settlement in Utah 8.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Thousands of miles of off-highway routes will get new travel management plans.
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Planes, pits & snowmobiles: how scientists get good data 6.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A day in the field as researchers wring water data from Colorado’s snowpack.
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Delinquent goats, a cat murder mystery and rock ‘n roll spiders 16.5.2016 Current Issue
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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It’s been a deadly winter for backcountry fun 9.2.2016 Writers on the Range
What would it take to keep snowmobilers and others safe in avalanche terrain?
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It's been a deadly winter for backcountry fun 9.2.2016 High Country News Most Recent
What would it take to keep snowmobilers and others safe in avalanche terrain?
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Coal Dethroned 25.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com .  In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountain tops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley’s all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that’s how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, West Virginia. “They’re going to blast that one next,” he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He’s referring to a process known as “mountain-top removal,” in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. “And then it’ll be just blank space,” he adds. “Like the Taylor Swift song.” Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from his taut skin. Dipping tobacco is tucked into his right cheek. He has a head of cropped blond curls that jog some memory of mine, but I can’t quite figure out what it is. He’s pointing at a peak named Coal River Mountain. ...
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Coal Dethroned 25.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com .  In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountain tops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley’s all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that’s how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, West Virginia. “They’re going to blast that one next,” he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He’s referring to a process known as “mountain-top removal,” in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. “And then it’ll be just blank space,” he adds. “Like the Taylor Swift song.” Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from his taut skin. Dipping tobacco is tucked into his right cheek. He has a head of cropped blond curls that jog some memory of mine, but I can’t quite figure out what it is. He’s pointing at a peak named Coal River Mountain. ...
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Nonviolent Resistance in Palestine: Steadfastness, Creativity and Hope 20.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Former President of Brazil Fernando Henrique Cardoso ; Ela Bhatt , an Indian advocate for the poor and women's rights. Some of these individuals, including Mairead Maguire , and Luisa Morgantini, sustained injuries during the protests. Burnat explains that the impetus for Palestinians to resist is embedded in their daily reality - their lives and environment under occupation teach them to resist. "I learned a lot of methods from Gandhi, Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela, but life teaches more. When you struggle and live the life under occupation; when you are suffering and in pain every day, it teaches you how to resist. It comes from the life. Nonviolent struggle comes from the life. We are a simple people and nonviolent resistance is a part of our lives." Creativity for Countering Repression, Celebrating Success Iyad discusses the process of coming up with the creative, diverse and ever-changing tactics and methods that are the hallmark of the village resistance movement. Members of the local ...
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Biking the line between wilderness and civilization 18.7.2015 High Country News Most Recent
A bikepacking trip in Canyonlands offers a new look at a well-travelled landscape.
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National forests to decide where snowmobiles are welcome 2.2.2015 High Country News Most Recent
A new rule requires the government to specify areas for winter motorized users.
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Men See Snout, Free Moose Buried In Avalanche 2.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A moose buried by an avalanche on an Alaska mountain had its luck changed by three men passing on snowmobiles.


The Alaska Dispatch News (http://bit.ly/1AinLEQ) reports that the three Matanuska-Susitna Borough residents spotted the animal's snout sticking out of the snow and used shovels to free the moose.


Marty Mobley, Rob Uphus and Avery Vunichich were on at outing Sunday at Hatcher Pass about 55 miles northeast of Anchorage when they passed a small hillside that had both ski and moose tracks.


When they returned an hour later, an avalanche had covered the tracks.


Mobley says he saw something move in the debris and it turned out to be a snout, not a skier.


After 10 minutes of digging, the moose stood up, towered over its rescuers and ran off.

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A Visit to the Aral Sea 13.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Over much of 2014, David Kroodsma and Lindsey Fransen are riding their bikes across parts of Asia , and sharing what they learn about the climate issues facing the countries they bike through. When we considered crossing Central Asia in a Ride for Climate, I knew we had to visit the Aral Sea - or at least what remains of it. Even though the sea's demise wasn't due to global warming, it's one of the world's worst environmental catastrophes, serving an example of how humans can alter the planet. We wanted to visit the sea, meet the people who live near it, and understand if it is truly the cautionary tale we've heard it to be. The Aral Sea was once fed by two mighty rivers, the Amu Darya and the Syr Darya, which flowed from the mountains of Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan into a vast desert, where they formed the Aral. The sea has no outlet - its water levels are determined by the balance between water flowing into it (or falling into it through rain) and evaporation. Fifty years ago it was the ...
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