User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Recreation :: Motorized Recreation
Last updated: Jul 14 2020 05:18 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How can we protect silence? 13.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
As more people push into once-remote areas, truly quiet spots are increasingly scarce.
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Will we ever know rec’s true impact on wildlife? 16.3.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Scientists race to quantify winter recreation’s impact on Canada lynx, but technology outpaces them.
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What’s threatening the elusive wolverine? 16.3.2020 High Country News Most Recent
As snowmobilers fight to preserve their pastime, scientists worry about the future of the species.
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Skiing and snowmobiling are as natural as the weather 17.1.2020 High Country News Most Recent
With human impacts felt everywhere, we need a new environmental ethic.
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When wildlife safety turns into fierce political debate 31.12.2019 Current Issue
In Island Park, Idaho, a fight over roadkill became a referendum on government control.
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Allowing off-highway vehicles in Utah’s national parks is a mistake 18.10.2019 High Country News Most Recent
More mechanized traffic in already crowded parks is another Trump administration gift to industry and Utah politicians.
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Hiking trails are a path to destruction for Colorado elk 27.8.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Recreationalists in Vail are having a devastating impact on the local herd.
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Wreckreation; snowmobile danger; a subdued vacuum 29.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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Hunting faces an ethical reckoning 18.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Gruesome social media videos show how far modern hunting has drifted from its roots.
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How to turn motorized rec into a sustainable economy 12.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
In 2010, Challis, Idaho, created a trail for ATV riders. Now, it’s enjoying an economic boost.
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Too many motors 18.9.2017 Current Issue
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The thru-hike you’ve never heard of: Oregon Desert Trail 30.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Photographer Meg Roussos shares views from her solo-trek deep in the backcountry.
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Sage grouse review; false coal stats; elk deaths 26.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
HCN.org news in brief.
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Enviros and BLM reach major public lands settlement in Utah 8.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Thousands of miles of off-highway routes will get new travel management plans.
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Planes, pits & snowmobiles: how scientists get good data 6.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A day in the field as researchers wring water data from Colorado’s snowpack.
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Delinquent goats, a cat murder mystery and rock ‘n roll spiders 16.5.2016 Current Issue
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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It’s been a deadly winter for backcountry fun 9.2.2016 Writers on the Range
What would it take to keep snowmobilers and others safe in avalanche terrain?
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It's been a deadly winter for backcountry fun 9.2.2016 High Country News Most Recent
What would it take to keep snowmobilers and others safe in avalanche terrain?
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Coal Dethroned 25.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com .  In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountain tops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley’s all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that’s how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, West Virginia. “They’re going to blast that one next,” he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He’s referring to a process known as “mountain-top removal,” in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. “And then it’ll be just blank space,” he adds. “Like the Taylor Swift song.” Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from his taut skin. Dipping tobacco is tucked into his right cheek. He has a head of cropped blond curls that jog some memory of mine, but I can’t quite figure out what it is. He’s pointing at a peak named Coal River Mountain. ...
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Coal Dethroned 25.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com .  In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountain tops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley’s all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that’s how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, West Virginia. “They’re going to blast that one next,” he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He’s referring to a process known as “mountain-top removal,” in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. “And then it’ll be just blank space,” he adds. “Like the Taylor Swift song.” Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from his taut skin. Dipping tobacco is tucked into his right cheek. He has a head of cropped blond curls that jog some memory of mine, but I can’t quite figure out what it is. He’s pointing at a peak named Coal River Mountain. ...
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