User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Mining
Last updated: Apr 23 2018 21:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Canary in the Coal Pond 23.4.2018 Truthout.com
New reports provide an unprecedented look at contaminants leaking from coal ash ponds and landfills. But the chasm between information and environmental protection may deepen thanks to a proposed Trump administration rollback that would lessen the consequences and weaken requirements for polluting power plants. Coal ash slurry pours into the first of two settling ponds adjacent to the Riverbend Steam Station on Mountain Island Lake in Gaston County, North Carolina, January 23, 2008. (Photo: Jeff Willhelm / Charlotte Observer / MCT via Getty Images) In tests conducted in late 2017, one in three coal-fired power plants nationwide detected "statistically significant" amounts of contaminants, including harmful chemicals like arsenic, in the groundwater around their facilities. This information, which utility companies had to post on their websites in March, became public for the first time under an Obama-era environmental rule regulating coal ash, the waste generated from burning coal. Mixed with water and ...
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Class Dismissed: Class Conflict in Red State America 17.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Kentucky public school teachers protest outside the Kentucky House Chamber as they rally for a day of action to pressure legislators to override Gov. Matt Bevin's recent veto of the state's tax and budget bills, April 13, 2018, in Frankfort, Kentucky. The teachers also oppose a controversial pension reform bill the governor signed into law. (Photo by Bill Pugliano / Getty Images) In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout. Teachers in red-state America are hard at work teaching us all a lesson. The American mythos has always rested on a belief that this country was born out of a kind of immaculate conception, that the New World came into being and has forever after been preserved as a land without the class hierarchies and conflicts that so disfigured Europe. The strikes, rallies, and walkouts of public school teachers in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, soon perhaps Arizona, and elsewhere ...
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Ecuador Grants Open-Pit Mining Permits in One of the World's Most Biodiverse Areas 1.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
The Equadorian government has opened huge portions of land to large-scale open-pit mining projects. Last week, Mindo residents were among the thousands who took to the streets all across Ecuador in a march to demand an end to environmentally destructive mining. Protesters march against mining on March 22, 2018, near Mindo, Ecuador. (Photo: Sophie Moon) Mindo is a small village in the lush, tropical cloud forest that descends from the Andes to the coast just outside of Quito, Ecuador. The cloud forest is home to an abundance of wildlife, such as brightly colored lizards, wild cats, spectacled bear, and over 600 species of birds. Mindo was recently named one of the top 10 places to birdwatch in the world by National Geographic , and those who live there are known for their conservationist stances and fights against oil corporations. The area is so rich in biodiversity that it has won the Audubon Christmas bird count competition seven times with the highest number of species. Last week, Mindo residents were ...
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How an Indigenous Woman Left Her Mark on a Tumultuous Presidential Campaign in Mexico 25.3.2018 Truthout.com
In these troubling and surreal times, honest journalism is more important than ever. Help us keep real news flowing: Make a donation to Truthout today. "Mexico has been kidnapped by those in power, and with your help we're going to get her back!" said María de Jesús Patricio at a political rally on 11 February. Her supporters filled the plaza outside the Palacio de Bellas Artes -- a historic cultural hub in the heart of Mexico City -- to listen to the woman that they hope can bring about a radical change in Mexican society.   Marichuy, as Patricio is commonly known, is an indigenous Nahua healer from the state of Jalisco in western Mexico. She was nominated by the National Indigenous Congress (CNI) , a coalition of 58 indigenous groups, as their spokesperson to represent them in this year's presidential campaigns. Though she did not succeed in collecting the required number of signatures to stand in the elections, expected 1 July 2018, the CNI says they will not be deterred. "After the 2018 elections ...
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Before the US Approves New Uranium Mining, Consider Its Toxic Legacy 28.2.2018 Truthout.com
Support from readers keeps Truthout 100 percent independent. If you like what you're reading, make a donation! Uranium -- the raw material for nuclear power and nuclear weapons -- is having a moment in the spotlight. Companies such as  Energy Fuels, Inc.  have played  well-publicized roles in lobbying the Trump administration to reduce federal protection for  public lands  with uranium deposits. The Defense Department's Nuclear Posture Review calls for  new weapons production  to expand the US nuclear arsenal, which could spur new domestic uranium mining. And the Interior Department is advocating more domestic uranium production, along with other materials identified as " critical minerals ."  What would expanded uranium mining in the US mean at the local level? I have studied the legacies of past uranium mining and milling in Western states for over a decade. My  book  examines dilemmas faced by uranium communities caught between harmful legacies of previous mining booms and the potential promise of new ...
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Fourteen Environmental Programs Eliminated in Trump's Budget Proposal 15.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout. President Trump released his  proposed federal budget for 2019  on Monday, and in the process pushed for the complete elimination of more than a dozen key environmental programs. These include, but are not limited to, areas of the government focusing on climate change, public lands and energy efficiency. Of course, these fully eliminated programs are just the tip of the iceberg. Trump's proposal also drastically slashes the budgets of the Environmental Protection Agency, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies critical to a sustainable future. The impact of proposed budget cuts on the EPA and other agencies, if passed, will be dramatic, but many operations will probably manage to limp on. That may not be so with the 14 programs Trump has proposed eliminating altogether: The Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy ...
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Monument reductions threaten future dinosaur discoveries 30.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Digs are imperiled by Trump’s move to slash protections for public land.
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Rural discontent finds a home in the State of Jefferson 22.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Irked by California’s ‘resistance’ to Trump, a separatist movement gains traction.
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The Trump Administration's Attacks on Public Lands and Waters Will Cause Irreparable Harm 18.1.2018 Truthout.com
The designation of a national monument protects the land from drilling, fracking, mining, logging -- protection not afforded to the majority of public land, says Randi Spivak of the Center for Biological Diversity. Spivak discusses why the largest delisting of protected federal lands in US history will harm species, waters and exacerbate climate change. Who are the powerful funders behind Truthout? Our readers! Help us publish more stories like this one by making a tax-deductible donation. In December, Trump  announced  that he would shrink Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments in Utah by 85 percent and 46 percent respectively. The announcement came after Trump had ordered Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke in April to review 27 national monuments created since 1996 that were 100,000 acres or larger, and Zinke subsequently recommended that these and other monuments be reduced. Trump's move represents the  largest  delisting of protected federal lands in US history, removing 2 ...
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Libby, Montana, tries to shake its ‘Superfund stigma’ 18.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Rebranding could help the town distance itself from past asbestos pollution.
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How to turn motorized rec into a sustainable economy 12.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
In 2010, Challis, Idaho, created a trail for ATV riders. Now, it’s enjoying an economic boost.
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Hopes for 2018 by Movement Leaders Around the Globe 9.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
"The innovation and vision of Black people is critical, along with the activation of millions who understand that our futures are tied to one another." —Alicia Garza. (Photo: KK Ottesen) With your support, Truthout can continue exposing inequality, analyzing policy and reporting on the struggle for a better world. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. Across the globe, 2017 brought us to new lows. Yet, even as crisis after crisis shook us to the ground, they also inspired many to rise up and take to the streets and other venues of popular power. Donald Trump as president awakened millions, sparked new cross-sectoral coalitions, and galvanized people to creative and effective action. Across the world, those who never had the luxury of complacency continued their struggles for participatory democracy; economic justice; an end to wars and violence; protection of the global commons; the rights and security of women, LGBTQ folk, and other excluded populations; and an end to theft and plunder of ...
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Hemp is one town’s way out of a uranium mining past 4.1.2018 Writers on the Range
A former mining region embraces a trade with a ‘hippie’ reputation.
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Brazil Announces End to Amazon Mega-Dam Building Policy 4.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Brazil's government this week announced a major shift away from its policy of building mega-dams in the Brazilian Amazon -- a strategy born during the country's military dictatorship and vigorously carried forward down to the present day. While environmentalists and Indigenous groups will likely celebrate, experts warn that many threats remain. Environmental activists hold banners during a demonstration, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 20, 2011, against the construction of Belo Monte dam at Xingu River, a tributary of the Amazon River in the northeastearn Brazilian state of Para. Belo Monte is planned to be the third largest hydroelectric plant in the world. The biggest banner reads "No to the new forest code." (Photo: YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP / Getty Images)   Far more people read Truthout than will ever donate -- but we rely on donations to keep our publication running strong. Support independent journalism by making a contribution now! In a surprise move, the Brazilian government has announced that the ...
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16 major environmental protections cut in 2017 28.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Climate change initiatives were the most targeted by the Trump administration.
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Glacier fires; nonsensical monument boundaries; alpine sublime 25.12.2017 Current Issue
HCN.org news in brief.
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Lawsuits challenge Trump’s trim of Utah monuments 20.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Reductions in Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante exclude thousands of significant objects.
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The 26,000 tons of radioactive waste under Lake Powell 19.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The West’s uranium boom brought dozens of mills to the banks of the Colorado River — where toxic waste was dumped irresponsibly.
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Reclaiming Appalachia: A Push to Bring Back Native Forests to Coal Country 14.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Near the top of Cheat Mountain in West Virginia, bulldozer operator Bill Moore gazes down a steep slope littered with toppled conifers. Tangled roots and angled boulders protrude from the slate-colored soil, and the earth is crisscrossed with deep gouges.
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Trump’s message for tribes: Let them eat yellowcake 12.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The president’s Bears Ears decision has toxic implications.
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