User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Mining
Last updated: Oct 19 2017 19:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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New Amazon Threat? Deforestation From Mining 19.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Surprising amount of rainforest loss occurs on – and off – mining leases, new study finds
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The seven groups extractives companies must engage 17.10.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
From employees and business partners to small-scale miners, engaging with these groups means the difference between a successful project and failure.
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Why save the small town? 17.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Cities may seem inevitable, but rural communities are finding ways to hang on.
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The Hopeful Work of Turning Appalachia's Mountaintop Coal Mines Into Farms 16.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Ready to challenge injustice and spark real change? So are we. Support Truthout's mission today by making a tax-deductible donation. On a surface-mine-turned-farm in Mingo County, West Virginia, former coal miner Wilburn Jude plunks down three objects on the bed of his work truck: a piece of coal, a sponge, and a peach. He's been tasked with bringing in items that represent his life's past, present, and future. "This is my heritage right here," he says, picking up the coal. Since the time of his Irish immigrant great-grandfathers, all the males in his family have been miners. "Right now I'm a sponge," he says, pointing to the next object, "learning up here on this job, in school, everywhere, and doing the best I can to change everything around me." Then he holds up the peach. "And then my future. I'm going to be a piece of fruit. I'm going to be able to put out good things to help other people." Jude works for Refresh Appalachia, a social enterprise that partners with Reclaim Appalachia to convert ...
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To halt mining, a tribe and a logging community weave together 7.10.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
In the 1980s, a mining company tried to divide a Wisconsin community. Instead, it created "one of the country’s fiercest grass-roots environmental face-offs.”
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Seabed mining can decide the fate of the deep ocean 28.9.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Calls grow for the disclosure about the environmental consequences of extracting valuable minerals from the ocean floor.
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Interior Desecrator 22.9.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
To no one’s surprise, Zinke has apparently recommended that President Trump shrink four national monuments and open six others to mining, drilling and logging.
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Coal. Guns. Freedom? 21.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
How the Trump administration has seized mythologies around coal.
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Trump administration erodes environmental protections 11.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The courts have slowed some rollbacks but many have moved ahead.
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The Pentagon's New Wonder Weapons For World Dominion 11.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Or Buck Rogers in the 21st Century.
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Menominee Tribe Seeks Stricter Federal Oversight in Michigan Mine Fight 3.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In its continued fight against a mine near sacred waters, the Menominee Indians of Wisconsin want stronger federal regulations to apply as officials weigh the final permit for mine approval. At issue is the Back Forty mine, a proposed 83-acre open pit gold, zinc and copper mine in the southwestern corner of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The mine would sit within 150 feet of the Menominee River, which forms the Michigan-Wisconsin border -- and is namesake for the Menominee Tribe across the border in Wisconsin. Environmental Health News highlighted the Menominee's fight last year in "Sacred Water," a national look at how culturally significant water resources -- both on and off reservation -- get sullied, destroyed, defaced by activities often happening beyond Native Americans' control. The mine was on track for approval but has been stagnant, as it still needs one permit -- a wetlands permit -- before beginning operation. The state of Michigan has controlled permitting to this point. This week the Menominee ...
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Colorado’s biggest methane emitter may get a discount 31.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In exchange, the state asks a coal mine to trap its gas—but the BLM won’t require it.
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Uranium pervades homes on and near Navajo Nation 27.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
EPA budget cuts threaten to slow a long-overdue cleanup.
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Details emerge on proposed monument cutbacks 25.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Interior Secretary Zinke says he will recommend reductions to some monuments, but not eliminations.
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Data mining finds more than expected beneath Andean Plateau 23.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Seismologists investigating how Earth forms new continental crust have compiled more than 20 years of seismic data from a wide swath of South America’s Andean Plateau and determined that processes there have produced far more continental rock than previously believed.
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Troubled Waters: Tennessee Families Stand Up for a Clean Environment 20.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Sterling and Stray, a now abandoned coal mine in Tennessee, is seen on May 18, 2017. (Photo: Valerie Vozza for Equal Voice News) Clairfield, Tennessee -- On the northern slope of Cooper Ridge --  a long, low-slung rise in Tennessee's Cumberland Mountains --  sits the 127-year-old Hatfield Cemetery, a well-maintained strip of flower-adorned plots where gravestones older than a century sit next to still-fresh graves. Bright pink ribbons hang in the tree branches surrounding the cemetery, marking 100 feet from the burial grounds. Beyond them is planned one of the largest surface coal mines in Tennessee's history. The mine will soon surround the cemetery. On an afternoon in May, a swath of clear-cut logging was visible through the trees, and heavy machinery could be heard over the sound of chirping birds.  The Cooper Ridge mine will span a total of roughly 1,400 acres of land, both above and below ground, stretching from the southern tip of the ridge where it will encircle Hatfield Cemetery to the northern ...
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The West’s latest prospecting frenzy? Extraterrestrial gold. 14.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Companies are hunting for lithium near Moab, Utah.
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Germany's Transition From Coal to Renewable Energy Offers Lessons for the Rest of the World 14.8.2017 Truthout.com
Seventy-seven-year-old Heinz Spahn -- whose blue eyes are both twinkling and stern -- vividly recalls his younger days. The Zollverein coal mine, where he worked in the area of Essen, Germany, was so clogged with coal dust, he remembers, that people would stir up a black cloud whenever they moved. "It was no pony farm," he says -- using the sardonic German phrase to describe the harsh conditions: The roar of machines was at a constant 110 decibels, and the men were nicknamed waschbar, or "raccoons," for the black smudges that permanently adorned their faces.  Today, the scene at  Zollverein  is very different. Inside the coal washery where Spahn once worked -- the largest building in the Zollverein mining complex -- the air is clean, and its up to 8,000 miners have been replaced by one-and-a-half million tourists annually. The whole complex is now a UNESCO world heritage site: Spahn, who worked here as a fusion welder until the mine shut down on December 23, 1986, is employed as a guide to teach tourists ...
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The West’s latest mining frenzy? Extraterrestrial gold. 14.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Companies are hunting for lithium near Moab, Utah.
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Whitley Award winner ornithologist’s claims on conservation of Great Indian Bustard raise doubts 8.8.2017 Pune – The Indian Express
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