User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Mining
Last updated: Jun 10 2019 20:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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A dam’s true legacy 10.6.2019 High Country News Most Recent
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Interior Department’s coal reboot ignores tribes and curtails public input 3.6.2019 High Country News Most Recent
The Obama administration wanted to rethink coal leasing; now, Trump is rushing forward.
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The ‘shenanigans’ behind a federal employee’s decision to blow the whistle 30.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Pressured by higher-ups, a Fish and Wildlife field supervisor smoothed the way for a 28,000-home development along a fragile Arizona river.
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Mining laws have long been used for recreation 24.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In Idaho, a law meant to boost mining actually allows for its end as recreation transforms the West’s economy.
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With Bill C-69, a weak environmental assessment system is about to get worse 16.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada The Trudeau government has released its discussion paper on the much-anticipated "project list" regulations for Bill C-69, the controversial Impact Assessment Act, which will replace the current environmental assessment law. The project list identifies the types of projects that would have to undergo a federal environmental impact assessment. This is the key regulation under the new act.  For virtually every activity with impacts on the environment -- pipelines, mines, nuclear reactors, highways -- the current project list would be weakened. The discussion paper proposes higher "thresholds" for the size of a project (longer pipelines, bigger mines, etc.) for it to require review -- so more projects could be built without assessment. Only renewable energy projects would face tighter thresholds. This is absolutely the wrong approach. A basic principle of environmental assessment is that you start by looking at everything.  Trying to guess in advance which projects might significantly ...
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Will the Trump administration boost uranium? 9.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Energy industry lobbying could lead to more mining from Bears Ears to Wyoming.
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Judge orders industries to pay royalties for public land extraction 25.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Tens of millions more dollars will flow into Western communities after a federal court throws out the Trump administration’s industry-friendly deal.
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Trump administration rubber stamps Arizona copper mine 12.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
An industry-friendly ruling contradicts years of concerns over potential damage to endangered species, water systems and Native American cultural sites.
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Russian investors are keen on Nevada’s copper 5.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Demand for clean cars is causing an uptick in copper mining in the West, but at what cost?
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Repowering old mines with new energies in the southwestern United States 3.4.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Renewables bring plenty of new potential to communities left
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Interior Dept. Nominee’s Rise A Win For His Former Lobbying Clients 28.3.2019 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New analysis shows ex-clients of longtime lobbyist David Bernhardt have had dozens of meetings with top agency officials.
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Mining companies pollute waterways. Citizens pay. 19.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Nearly 2 billion pounds of toxic waste were dumped into western waterways in 2017, and taxpayers are left to clean up the mess.
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Militias, MAGA activists and one border town’s complicated resistance 13.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
How Arivaca, Arizona, became a magnet for anti-immigrant activists – and what locals did next.
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Across Appalachia, historic coal towns are looking to the outdoor economy for their next act 6.3.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Can recreation and tourism benefit the regional economy and fill a gap left by the declining coal industry — sustainably?
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When conservation provides a cover for anti-Indigenous sentiments 20.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A nation of laws cannot exist on stolen land.
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Fortuna Silver mine opposed by community of Santa Carina Minas in Oaxaca, Mexico 15.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson In November 2018, Peace Brigades International-Canada brought two human rights defenders from Mexico to share their concerns about the intentions and impacts of Vancouver-based Fortuna Silver Mines in the south-eastern state of Oaxaca. Salvador Martínez Arellanes and Neftalí Reyes Méndez visited Toronto and Ottawa with firsthand information and updates about the concerns being expressed by the residents of Santa Catarina Minas, a community in the Central Valleys Region of Oaxaca. Martinez Arellanes is an Indigenous leader from Santa Carina Minas, while Reyes Méndez is with the Oaxacan Territorial Defense Collective and EDUCA, a non-governmental organization based in the city of Oaxaca that promotes justice, equality and social participation. Virry Schaafsma, the Mexico City-based Advocacy Coordinator for Peace Brigades International – Mexico Project , travelled with them to Canada. Large parts of the territory in Oaxaca have been granted to Fortuna Silver without the consent of local ...
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Environmental victories don’t guarantee economic justice 14.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Without a just transition, the Navajo Generating Station closure will have harmful consequences.
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5 things to look for in the Green New Deal 6.2.2019 GreenBiz.com
From job losses to carbon taxes to just what clean energy means, anyway, here's what to watch in the new policy proposal.
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Honduran journalist Dina Meza faces danger to report on human rights abuses 5.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson Dina Meza is a journalist in a country where it can be deadly to report on injustices. At least 62 journalists have been killed in Honduras between 2006 and 2017, making it one of the most dangerous countries in the world for reporters. Journalists are also regularly threatened when they report on vested interests. For example, Nobel Peace Prize winner Jody Williams, who led a group of women that included Sarah Harmer and Tantoo Cardinal to Honduras in 2012, has written, "Our delegation met with women who have been impacted by the San Martin mine in the Siria Valley. The mine is owned by a subsidiary of Canadian Goldcorp. The women talked about how the mining operation has contaminated local water supplies." Williams then highlighted, "A few days before we arrived in Honduras, Gilda Carolina Silvestrucci -- a local journalist who was talking to environmental activists about the problems with mining in the Siria Valley -- received threats against her life and those of her children." And ...
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Is nuclear energy the key to saving the planet? 10.12.2018 Current Issue
A new generation of environmentalists is learning to stop worrying and love atomic power.
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