User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Mining
Last updated: Dec 15 2017 24:58 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Reclaiming Appalachia: A Push to Bring Back Native Forests to Coal Country 14.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Near the top of Cheat Mountain in West Virginia, bulldozer operator Bill Moore gazes down a steep slope littered with toppled conifers. Tangled roots and angled boulders protrude from the slate-colored soil, and the earth is crisscrossed with deep gouges.
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Trump’s message for tribes: Let them eat yellowcake 12.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The president’s Bears Ears decision has toxic implications.
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Trump’s message for tribes: Let them eat yellow cake 12.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The president’s Bears Ears decision has toxic implications.
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West Obsessed: The American alpine sublime 11.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A new collection by a turn-of-the century poet raises questions about wildness.
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Trump's Assault on National Monuments, in the Name of "Jobs," Should Not Be Believed 10.12.2017 Truthout.com
In shrinking Utah's two prized national monuments Trump not only ignored the 80 percent negative comments received in the review process, he never consulted the Native American tribes whose land and heritage will be most impacted. Moreover, opening up the land to ranching, fracking and mining will not only not generate enough jobs, it will destroy existing jobs in the eco-tourism industry. Thousands of people converged on the steps of Utah's State Capital building to protest President Trump's plan to shrink protected areas across the country. Two of those areas are both in Utah -- Bears Ears and the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monuments. (Photo: Michael Nigro / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images) In a landmark proclamation on December 4, President Trump slashed the size of Utah's Bears Ears National Monument and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument by  85 percent and 46 percent , respectively. This, in spite of the fact that  80 percent  of commenters solicited in the review ...
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What national monument protections do 8.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Some say the Bears Ears shrinkage won’t change anything — they’re wrong.
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Interior Department’s return to the ‘Robber Baron’ years 8.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Secretary Ryan Zinke will be known better for cynicism than conservationism.
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The struggle continues between Q'eqchi' communities and Hudbay Minerals 2.12.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Rachel Small "In my community we are fighting for our lands and we will protect them until we die." Margarita Caal Caal explained to over 150 people who had packed into the Toronto Friends' House on November 23. "I am here to tell you the truth." Margarita is one of 11 Mayan Q'eqchi' women from the tiny Guatemalan community of Lote Ocho at the frontlines of the struggle against Hudbay Minerals. The women had traveled to Toronto to be cross-examined as part of the lawsuit they launched against the Canadian mining company in 2010. The suit addresses the gang-rape of 11 women from Lote Ocho by mining company security personnel, police, and military during the forced eviction of their village and families from their ancestral lands on January 17, 2007. The company is also being sued for the murder of community leader Adolfo Ich Chamán and the shooting and paralyzing of German Chub. I first traveled to Lote Ocho in 2009. The entire community gathered in an open air structure at the centre of their land to ...
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Increased Vegetation Boosts Rainfall in the Sahel, Researchers Find 1.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Droughts can grip the vast Sahel region of Africa for decades, dramatically altering the border where forest and savannahs give way to the Sahara Desert. Predicting those droughts is vital, but hard.
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In rural Colorado, can art provide an economic engine? 30.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A small town invests in affordable housing for the creative sector.
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Keystone pipeline leak a reminder to 'respect existence or expect resistance' 24.11.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics Last week in Bonn, Germany, thousands gathered at the heavily secured United Nations climate conference, dubbed "COP 23," a Potemkin village of bureaucrats, politicians, environmentalists, journalists and local support staff. Sixty kilometers away, in the 12,000-year-old Hambach Forest, scores of activists, living in treehouses, defended the old growth woodland in an ongoing struggle to save the rare ecosystem from destruction and stop the expansion of Europe's largest open-pit mine, a sprawling hole in the earth where energy company RWE extracts lignite, or brown coal, the dirtiest coal on earth. Hanging over both was the political pall cast by President Donald Trump, who announced June 1 that he was pulling the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement, the global climate change accord negotiated by all the countries of the world. "Whilst the United States might be saying that it's pulling out, it still continues to play a destructive role," Asad Rehman, executive director of London-based War on ...
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Advice from Moab’s mayor: Be careful what you wish for 23.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
As his final term ends, Dave Sakrison weighs the cost of decades of transformation.
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"Keep It in the Ground": As UN Climate Summit Ends, Activists Protest at Europe's Largest Open-Pit Coal Mine 17.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Throughout the United Nations climate summit in Bonn, Germany, activists have been protesting against fossil fuels. Early this morning, Democracy Now! drove about 45 minutes west of Bonn to the forests of western Germany, where activists unfurled a banner at the largest open-pit coal mine in Europe that read, "It's Up to Us to Keep It in the Ground." "You can't separate the peace movement from the climate movement," says Lea Heuser, winner of Germany's Aachen Peace Prize. TRANSCRIPT AMY GOODMAN: Yes, this is Democracy Now! We're broadcasting live from the final day of the UN climate summit here in Bonn, Germany, where, all this week, activists have been protesting against fossil fuels, especially coal. Well, early this morning, we drove about 45 minutes west of Bonn to the forests of western Germany. For years, activists there have been fighting to shut down the largest open-pit coal mine in Europe. The massive Hambach mine extracts an extremely dirty form of coal called lignite, also known as brown ...
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A nearly forgotten poet’s view from above timberline 13.11.2017 Current Issue
Belle Turnbull found transcendence in the Colorado Rockies.
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The US Southern Command's Silent Occupation of the Amazon 9.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, thanks a Brazilian soldier for assisting with his tour of the jungle training center in Manaus, Brazil, on March 28, 2012. Dempsey was there to visit the jungle training center which borders several different countries in the Amazon Basin. (DOD photo by US Army Staff Sgt. Sun L. Vega, Joint Staff) The US is conducting joint military exercises on Indigenous territories in the Amazon under the pretext of training local troops to deliver emergency humanitarian aid. However, local activists are warning that the operation is nothing more than a strategic move to gain access to natural resources on Indigenous land and bolster US hegemony in the region.   Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, thanks a Brazilian soldier for assisting with his tour of the jungle training center in Manaus, Brazil, on March 28, 2012. Dempsey was there to visit the jungle training center which borders several different countries in the ...
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In the Water-Scarce Southwest, an Ancient Irrigation System Disrupts Big Agriculture 7.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! Water in the American Southwest has never been abundant. Its availability fluctuates depending on conditions like drought and mountain snowpack that feeds streams and rivers. But  experts  predict a future of greater extremes: longer and hotter heat waves in the summer, less precipitation, decreased snowpack, and more severe and frequent droughts that will place greater stress on water users. In  New Mexico  and  Colorado , legal statutes enable an area's original water users to transfer their portions of the resource, via pipelines, to the highest bidder virtually anywhere in the state. When scarcity hits, industrial mining and agricultural operations can afford to purchase additional water while small-scale farmers and ranchers remain vulnerable; in both states, water use already exceeds availability. But for over a century, acequias -- an ancient form of community water ...
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In Grand Staircase-Escalante, coal and fossils lie side by side 3.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
What could be lost as monument opponents push for mining.
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Raton tries to rise again 2.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A former coal mining town takes measured approach to economic recovery.
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Navajo small businesses help stabilize booms and busts 1.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
To build a sustained community, the Navajo Nation experiments with entrepreneurs.
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New Amazon Threat? Deforestation From Mining 19.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Surprising amount of rainforest loss occurs on – and off – mining leases, new study finds
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