User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Mining
Last updated: Apr 13 2019 24:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump administration rubber stamps Arizona copper mine 12.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
An industry-friendly ruling contradicts years of concerns over potential damage to endangered species, water systems and Native American cultural sites.
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Russian investors are keen on Nevada’s copper 5.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Demand for clean cars is causing an uptick in copper mining in the West, but at what cost?
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Repowering old mines with new energies in the southwestern United States 3.4.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Renewables bring plenty of new potential to communities left
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Interior Dept. Nominee’s Rise A Win For His Former Lobbying Clients 28.3.2019 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New analysis shows ex-clients of longtime lobbyist David Bernhardt have had dozens of meetings with top agency officials.
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Mining companies pollute waterways. Citizens pay. 19.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Nearly 2 billion pounds of toxic waste were dumped into western waterways in 2017, and taxpayers are left to clean up the mess.
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Militias, MAGA activists and one border town’s complicated resistance 13.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
How Arivaca, Arizona, became a magnet for anti-immigrant activists – and what locals did next.
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Across Appalachia, historic coal towns are looking to the outdoor economy for their next act 6.3.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Can recreation and tourism benefit the regional economy and fill a gap left by the declining coal industry — sustainably?
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When conservation provides a cover for anti-Indigenous sentiments 20.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A nation of laws cannot exist on stolen land.
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Fortuna Silver mine opposed by community of Santa Carina Minas in Oaxaca, Mexico 15.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson In November 2018, Peace Brigades International-Canada brought two human rights defenders from Mexico to share their concerns about the intentions and impacts of Vancouver-based Fortuna Silver Mines in the south-eastern state of Oaxaca. Salvador Martínez Arellanes and Neftalí Reyes Méndez visited Toronto and Ottawa with firsthand information and updates about the concerns being expressed by the residents of Santa Catarina Minas, a community in the Central Valleys Region of Oaxaca. Martinez Arellanes is an Indigenous leader from Santa Carina Minas, while Reyes Méndez is with the Oaxacan Territorial Defense Collective and EDUCA, a non-governmental organization based in the city of Oaxaca that promotes justice, equality and social participation. Virry Schaafsma, the Mexico City-based Advocacy Coordinator for Peace Brigades International – Mexico Project , travelled with them to Canada. Large parts of the territory in Oaxaca have been granted to Fortuna Silver without the consent of local ...
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Environmental victories don’t guarantee economic justice 14.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Without a just transition, the Navajo Generating Station closure will have harmful consequences.
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5 things to look for in the Green New Deal 6.2.2019 GreenBiz.com
From job losses to carbon taxes to just what clean energy means, anyway, here's what to watch in the new policy proposal.
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Honduran journalist Dina Meza faces danger to report on human rights abuses 5.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson Dina Meza is a journalist in a country where it can be deadly to report on injustices. At least 62 journalists have been killed in Honduras between 2006 and 2017, making it one of the most dangerous countries in the world for reporters. Journalists are also regularly threatened when they report on vested interests. For example, Nobel Peace Prize winner Jody Williams, who led a group of women that included Sarah Harmer and Tantoo Cardinal to Honduras in 2012, has written, "Our delegation met with women who have been impacted by the San Martin mine in the Siria Valley. The mine is owned by a subsidiary of Canadian Goldcorp. The women talked about how the mining operation has contaminated local water supplies." Williams then highlighted, "A few days before we arrived in Honduras, Gilda Carolina Silvestrucci -- a local journalist who was talking to environmental activists about the problems with mining in the Siria Valley -- received threats against her life and those of her children." And ...
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Is nuclear energy the key to saving the planet? 10.12.2018 Current Issue
A new generation of environmentalists is learning to stop worrying and love atomic power.
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How the military is proving that America doesn't need coal for grid security 28.11.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Defense bases are using wind, solar and battery storage to face the threats of extreme weather or attack.
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Climate change and corporate greed combine to destroy forests with fire and felling 26.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn The razing of millions of acres of forests by wildfires has been increasing in scale and intensity for the past few decades. This year has set new records for the number of trees and shrubs destroyed by fire -- not just in the United States and Canada, but also in many other countries, including England, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Sweden, Latvia, and North Korea. Wildfires, of course, have been a yearly occurrence in the summer months for centuries. Triggered mainly by lightning, they were nature's way of disposing of dead timber and providing fertile ground for new plant growth. That is still an important natural process, although many conflagrations today are unnaturally caused by human carelessness, such as poorly tended campfires and flipped-away cigarette butts. Far more devastating for the world's forests today, however, are the effects of global warming, mostly caused by the greenhouse gas emissions that emanate from the burning of fossil fuels. One of the detrimental effects of climate ...
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Squatting trees to stop a coal mine 19.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Political Action The occupation of numerous old growth trees in the Hambach Forest (Hambacher Forst) near Cologne, Germany, provides an inspiring and innovative example of grassroots resistance to the carbon-intensive, climate-killing coal industry that we can apply to struggles in this country. The open-pit lignite (a low-grade, brown coal) mine, owned by the German transnational RWE, is reported to be both the largest and most heavily polluting coal mine in Europe. Over a six-year period activists have camped in the 12,000-year-old forest to stop the expansion of the 33-square mile coal mine and protect the last 10 per cent of the forest from being destroyed. An estimated 150 to 250 activists live in 60-70 treehouses year-round. They live without running water (they collect rain water), use a compost toilet, have no electricity (other than what is generated by solar panels), and cook vegan in community kitchens in the treehouses with food collected by dumpster diving. One activist told Democracy Now! ...
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President Trump is sacrificing our public lands legacy 23.8.2018 Writers on the Range
From reversing mitigation policies to opening our public lands to oil and gas drilling, the insults keep mounting.
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Canary in the Coal Pond 23.4.2018 Truthout.com
New reports provide an unprecedented look at contaminants leaking from coal ash ponds and landfills. But the chasm between information and environmental protection may deepen thanks to a proposed Trump administration rollback that would lessen the consequences and weaken requirements for polluting power plants. Coal ash slurry pours into the first of two settling ponds adjacent to the Riverbend Steam Station on Mountain Island Lake in Gaston County, North Carolina, January 23, 2008. (Photo: Jeff Willhelm / Charlotte Observer / MCT via Getty Images) In tests conducted in late 2017, one in three coal-fired power plants nationwide detected "statistically significant" amounts of contaminants, including harmful chemicals like arsenic, in the groundwater around their facilities. This information, which utility companies had to post on their websites in March, became public for the first time under an Obama-era environmental rule regulating coal ash, the waste generated from burning coal. Mixed with water and ...
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Class Dismissed: Class Conflict in Red State America 17.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Kentucky public school teachers protest outside the Kentucky House Chamber as they rally for a day of action to pressure legislators to override Gov. Matt Bevin's recent veto of the state's tax and budget bills, April 13, 2018, in Frankfort, Kentucky. The teachers also oppose a controversial pension reform bill the governor signed into law. (Photo by Bill Pugliano / Getty Images) In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout. Teachers in red-state America are hard at work teaching us all a lesson. The American mythos has always rested on a belief that this country was born out of a kind of immaculate conception, that the New World came into being and has forever after been preserved as a land without the class hierarchies and conflicts that so disfigured Europe. The strikes, rallies, and walkouts of public school teachers in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, soon perhaps Arizona, and elsewhere ...
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Ecuador Grants Open-Pit Mining Permits in One of the World's Most Biodiverse Areas 1.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
The Equadorian government has opened huge portions of land to large-scale open-pit mining projects. Last week, Mindo residents were among the thousands who took to the streets all across Ecuador in a march to demand an end to environmentally destructive mining. Protesters march against mining on March 22, 2018, near Mindo, Ecuador. (Photo: Sophie Moon) Mindo is a small village in the lush, tropical cloud forest that descends from the Andes to the coast just outside of Quito, Ecuador. The cloud forest is home to an abundance of wildlife, such as brightly colored lizards, wild cats, spectacled bear, and over 600 species of birds. Mindo was recently named one of the top 10 places to birdwatch in the world by National Geographic , and those who live there are known for their conservationist stances and fights against oil corporations. The area is so rich in biodiversity that it has won the Audubon Christmas bird count competition seven times with the highest number of species. Last week, Mindo residents were ...
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