User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Policy
Last updated: Jul 09 2020 17:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How tree-planting startup Propagate Ventures monetizes land conservation 9.7.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
How tree-planting startup Propagate Ventures monetizes land conservation Heather Clancy Thu, 07/09/2020 - 01:30 Earlier this year, when I was chatting with venture capitalist Nancy Pfund of DBL Partners about which new areas of climate solutions were intriguing to her, she pointed to business models that had the potential to monetize land conservation. The example we discussed that day wasn’t one I would think of immediately: Better Place Forests, which is creating what it calls "conservation memorial forests." It’s a different model for saving trees that takes a cue from the end-of-life industry.  Instead of buying a cemetery or mausoleum plot for cremated ashes, you or your family can pay toward the preservation of a tree —  the fee starts at $2,900. The ashes are mixed with soil at the base, along with a memorial marker. Currently, the company is protecting forests in Northern California and Arizona. But that’s not all: For every person and tree it memorializes, it plants at least 25 impact trees in ...
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How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice 6.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice Kristoffer Tigue Mon, 07/06/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in InsideClimate News and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. In many ways, Maleta Kimmons defines her neighborhood by what it lacks. Several houses near her home remain vacant. Last week, she had to drive seven miles just to buy groceries. And two weeks ago, at the height of the Minneapolis protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd by a police officer May 25, looters broke into the only pharmacy in the area, forcing the store to close and leaving many in the neighborhood without easy access to life-saving medication such as insulin or inhalers for asthma. Kimmons, who prefers to go by the name Queen, said what her neighborhood doesn't lack is pollution. Near North, where Queen lives, is one of several neighborhoods that make up north Minneapolis, a  predominately ...
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Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
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The only catfish native to the Western U.S. is running out of water 1.7.2020 Current Issue
The Yaqui catfish was going extinct. Then came the border wall.
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Video: Idaho’s public lands transcend partisan divides 30.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Despite political affiliation, Idaho hunters and anglers agree public lands need protection.
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Wildland firefighters are risking their mental health 29.6.2020 Current Issue
As climate change lengthens fire seasons, can the government do enough to protect them?
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The West has a role in reimagining the U.S. 23.6.2020 Current Issue
Our notion of ‘American exceptionalism’ has collapsed. What will replace it?
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The Great American Outdoors Act passes Senate with bipartisan support 19.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
The legislation will alleviate a national park project backlog and permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund.
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The West’s invisible menace: Microplastics 18.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
‘Just because we can’t see them in front of us, doesn’t mean we’re not breathing them in.’
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Coronavirus concerns revive labor organizing 18.6.2020 Current Issue
Washington fruit packers seek lasting gains from pandemic strikes.
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Navajo ranchers are raising premium beef. 17.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Is their success sustainable?
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3 keys for scaling nature-based solutions for climate adaptation 17.6.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published in World Resources Institute . In Indonesia, climate change is already a pernicious threat. More than 30 million people across northern Java suffer from coastal flooding and erosion related to more severe storms and sea level rise. In some places, entire villages and more than a mile of coastline have been lost to the sea. The flooding and erosion are exacerbated by the destruction of natural mangrove forests. These forests absorb the brunt of waves’ impact, significantly reducing both the height and speed of waves reaching shore. And mature mangroves can store nearly 1,000 tons of carbon per hectare, thus mitigating climate change while also helping communities adapt. Without mangroves, 18 million more people worldwide would suffer from coastal flooding each year (an increase of 39 percent). That’s why in Demak, Java, a diverse group of residents, NGOs, universities and the Indonesian government are working together on the "Building with Nature" project to restore a ...
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Bureau of Land Management investigates a new Bundy ranch project 16.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Ryan Bundy is allegedly building irrigation structures in Gold Butte National Monument.
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Vulnerable Republicans flip their stance on conservation bill 15.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Ahead of the elections, two senators champion the Land and Water Conservation fund, showing the political power of public lands.
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The Forest Service should embrace a full-time workforce 15.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Permanently investing in firefighters would improve the health of employees and the landscapes we protect.
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The border wall threatens decades of binational wildlife conservation 8.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Binational groups are preserving migratory corridors and restoring degraded areas in the Borderlands. Will the landscape be severed?
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Lawsuit challenges acting BLM director’s Senate confirmation avoidance 1.6.2020 Current Issue
William Perry Pendley had his tenure extended in early May.
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Catching a band of wildlife killers 1.6.2020 Current Issue
How a bounty of digital evidence led to the downfall of one of the nation’s deadliest poaching crews.
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Go on a literary road trip through the Golden State 29.5.2020 High Country News Most Recent
From California dreaming to California realities, here are five books to escape with when you’re stuck at home.
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How the Navajo got their day in the sun 28.5.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
How the Navajo got their day in the sun Danny Kennedy Thu, 05/28/2020 - 02:00 In late March, during the early hours of the COVID-19 crisis, just as New Yorkers were realizing how many might die, a small solar development company closed a $4 million financing deal. "Closing" is never easy, but getting a half-dozen high-net-worth individuals, family offices and foundations to pony up as the world’s finance markets crashed around them was a triumph.  Getting the deal done was impressive in its own right, given that private equity had all but frozen in the weeks before and most venture-backed startups were running on fumes, telling their angel investors and anyone who’d listen that they had three months’ financial runway, or less. It seems even more important now, given the terrible toll COVID-19 is having right where the solar is planned: the Navajo Nation. A young team saddled with ambition and support from their tribal government, this largely native-owned company, Navajo Power , was getting ready to ...
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