User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Forestry
Last updated: Nov 14 2018 16:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Burning to solve climate change: The BECCS paradox 14.11.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
For land rights and justice, the international climate solution is controversial.
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Home Depot is coming full circle 14.11.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
The home improvement giant is building the circular economy into the built environment.
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Lessons learned from centuries of indigenous forest management 28.9.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Ecologist Charles M. Peters discusses how, in an era of runaway destruction of tropical forests, the centuries-old understanding of indigenous woodland residents can lead restoration efforts.
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Climate change and corporate greed combine to destroy forests with fire and felling 26.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn The razing of millions of acres of forests by wildfires has been increasing in scale and intensity for the past few decades. This year has set new records for the number of trees and shrubs destroyed by fire -- not just in the United States and Canada, but also in many other countries, including England, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Sweden, Latvia, and North Korea. Wildfires, of course, have been a yearly occurrence in the summer months for centuries. Triggered mainly by lightning, they were nature's way of disposing of dead timber and providing fertile ground for new plant growth. That is still an important natural process, although many conflagrations today are unnaturally caused by human carelessness, such as poorly tended campfires and flipped-away cigarette butts. Far more devastating for the world's forests today, however, are the effects of global warming, mostly caused by the greenhouse gas emissions that emanate from the burning of fossil fuels. One of the detrimental effects of climate ...
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6 reasons why the practice of silvopasture will help save modern farming 4.8.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The ecological connectivity practice offers benefits to us all.
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Storm damage to forests costs billions — here's how artificial intelligence can help 25.6.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
What happens when computer science and forest management meet.
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These 8 nature-based startups from around the world are going to save it 13.6.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
And this environmental impact accelerator is going to help.
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Have Chinese companies finally joined the sustainability bandwagon? 7.6.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
China's corporate aforestation efforts are encouraging, but consumer demand for environmental products is lagging.
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17 organizations feeding the world through regenerative agriculture 21.5.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Re-building resilience, one community at a time.
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How leveraging social norms can promote ethical timber use 8.5.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
People love trees and know that deforestation is harmful. So how do we truly put an end to it?
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Forests as a climate solution? Yes, naturally 17.4.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Sponsored: Forests clean air and water, provide economic well-being, support biodiversity, provide forest products that people depend on — and serve as the world’s oldest carbon storage technology. That’s worth talking about.
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U.S. Superfund sites offer lessons for the future 30.3.2018 GreenBiz.com
Superfund sites are being repurposed as recreational areas, renewable energy facilities and more.
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Indigenous and Rural Women Conserve Mother Earth and Empower Their Communities 7.3.2018 Truthout.com
Women's rights and gender equality are crucial for not just women, but also for their communities and the environment. Increasing women's leadership in natural resource management, for example, is not only beneficial for biodiversity but also increases livelihood opportunities for women, thus improving their ability to plan for their families and resulting in positive outcomes for their communities. On this International Women's Day, we bring you a photo essay about Indigenous and rural women and their innate connection to nature. Women's rights and gender equality are crucial for not just women, but also for their communities and the environment. Women play a key role in the conservation of biodiversity and forests. A growing body of evidence shows that increasing women's leadership in natural resource management and governance is not only beneficial for biodiversity but also empowers women, increases their livelihood opportunities, improves their ability to plan for their families and results in ...
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World's Tallest Timber Tower Proposed for Tokyo 26.2.2018 Planet Ark News
Japanese timber company Sumitomo Forestry has revealed plans for the world's tallest wooden building in Tokyo, a 350-metre skyscraper that would also be the country's highest. Named W350, the ambitious tower would be almost four times higher than the world's current tallest timber building - the 18-storey Brock Commons Student Residence in Vancouver, Canada. At 350 metres tall, the skyscraper would also become Japan's tallest building.
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Corporations need nature's regenerative service 2.2.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Many people do not perceive the value of wilderness areas, even though we receive life-sustaining services from them every day.
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Why aren’t marbled murrelets recovering? 31.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
The enigmatic bird’s populations have not increased despite conservation efforts.
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5 ways to unlock restoration finance 31.1.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Seeding one of the most overlooked opportunities for economic growth.
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These 14 businesses are growing money on trees 25.1.2018 GreenBiz.com
Restoring degraded and deforested land is becoming a thriving economic opportunity, in the U.S and beyond.
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Bayou Bridge Pipeline Faces Mounting Legal Challenges in Louisiana 24.1.2018 Truthout.com
The Bayou Bridge pipeline will span southern Louisiana from Lake Charles, near the Texas border, to St. James, about 60 miles west of New Orleans, thus cutting through the US's largest swamp. Though Energy Transfer Partners has all the permits and permissions it needs to start work, the project still faces multiple legal challenges. Dean Wilson in the Atchafalaya Basin in front of a cypress tree in the proposed path of the Bayou Bridge pipeline. (All photos by Julie Dermansky) Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. Though Energy Transfer Partners has all the permits and permissions it needs to start work on the Bayou Bridge pipeline, the project still faces multiple legal challenges.  The 162-mile pipeline, being built by the same company behind the  Dakota Access pipeline , will span southern Louisiana from Lake Charles, near the Texas border, to St. James, about 60 miles west of New Orleans. This route will cut through the Atchafalaya Basin, ...
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How One Mississippi Teen Went 1,266 Days Behind Bars Before Receiving a Mental Evaluation 1.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Michael Gaida ) On Nov. 17, 2012, Tyler Haire was arrested in Vardaman, Mississippi, for attacking his father's girlfriend with a knife. Tyler, 16, had called 911 himself, and when they arrived, the local police found him seated quietly on a tree stump outside the home on County Road 433. The boy alternately said he could remember nothing and that they had the wrong man. Tyler was taken to the county jail in Pittsboro, 12 miles away, where the sheriff, worried that the awkward and overweight boy might hurt himself or be targeted by other inmates, placed him in a cell used for solitary confinement. Tyler had turned 17 by the time, five months later, a grand jury indicted him for aggravated assault, and his case went before a judge. Tyler's defense lawyer, appointed by the court, informed the judge in a court filing that his attempts at speaking with the boy had made it apparent the 17-year-old did not have "sufficient mental capacity" to understand the charge he was facing. The lawyer wanted Tyler ...
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