User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Places :: Arizona
Last updated: Jun 10 2019 20:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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A dam’s true legacy 10.6.2019 High Country News Most Recent
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Mining laws have long been used for recreation 24.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In Idaho, a law meant to boost mining actually allows for its end as recreation transforms the West’s economy.
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On the Road to 50: A grand beginning 13.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
At a dangerous and promising time, HCN tells the many stories of the West.
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Will the Trump administration boost uranium? 9.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Energy industry lobbying could lead to more mining from Bears Ears to Wyoming.
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Tenacious & twelve; junior ranger at 103; imperiled snowplow drivers 18.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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My friend, Doug the fir 25.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Conversations in Arizona with a giant coniferous tree.
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The Grand Canyon turns 100 11.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A reflection on the peculiar history that lead to the iconic National Park designation.
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States and advocates help tackle ‘crisis’ at national parks 8.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Amid the government shutdown, the Park Service faces trash mounds and lost revenue.
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‘Organic’ litter is not copacetic 7.9.2018 Writers on the Range
Even orange peels be damned — don’t toss your food on the trail.
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To protect a forest, a town agreed to leave it alone 9.8.2018 Writers on the Range
With wildfires looming, Flagstaff came together to support national forest closures.
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Arizona Educators Stage First Statewide Walkout as Teacher Revolt Grows 26.4.2018 Truthout.com
Strikers listen to a speaker during the #RedForEd strike in Arizona, April 25, 2017. (Photo: Arizona Education Association ) Unlike West Virginia and Oklahoma, today's teacher walkout in Arizona is the first statewide strike ever held by educators in the Grand Canyon State. But the state still resembles others revolting this spring because educators there also lack collective bargaining rights under so-called "right-to-work" provisions, and their decision walk out over decades of low pay and cuts to education is technically illegal. Strikers listen to a speaker during the #RedForEd strike in Arizona, April 25, 2017. (Photo: Arizona Education Association ) Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this one: We depend on reader support! Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. Unlike West Virginia and Oklahoma, today's teacher walkout in Arizona is the first statewide strike ever held by educators in the Grand Canyon State. But the state still resembles others revolting this spring because educators ...
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Before the US Approves New Uranium Mining, Consider Its Toxic Legacy 28.2.2018 Truthout.com
Support from readers keeps Truthout 100 percent independent. If you like what you're reading, make a donation! Uranium -- the raw material for nuclear power and nuclear weapons -- is having a moment in the spotlight. Companies such as  Energy Fuels, Inc.  have played  well-publicized roles in lobbying the Trump administration to reduce federal protection for  public lands  with uranium deposits. The Defense Department's Nuclear Posture Review calls for  new weapons production  to expand the US nuclear arsenal, which could spur new domestic uranium mining. And the Interior Department is advocating more domestic uranium production, along with other materials identified as " critical minerals ."  What would expanded uranium mining in the US mean at the local level? I have studied the legacies of past uranium mining and milling in Western states for over a decade. My  book  examines dilemmas faced by uranium communities caught between harmful legacies of previous mining booms and the potential promise of new ...
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The uncompromising environmentalist behind the Sierra Club 5.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
A new book details the rise of the Sierra Club from hiking group to political force.
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We have better options than killing bison 18.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Annual culls, loss of genetic diversity and climate change set the odds against American bison.
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Trump’s message for tribes: Let them eat yellowcake 12.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The president’s Bears Ears decision has toxic implications.
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Trump’s message for tribes: Let them eat yellow cake 12.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The president’s Bears Ears decision has toxic implications.
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Katie Lee, champion of the Glen Canyon, remembered 18.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Craig Childs recalls the fearless conservationist who loved an undammed river.
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Latest: Grand Canyon ‘mega-development’ voted down 16.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Navajo council rejects plans for Escalade’s tram, shops, restaurants.
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"Nature Has Rights": Activists Call for a Legal Transformation 10.11.2017 Truthout.com
The Colorado River runs through Grand Canyon National Park. (Photo: Jacalyn Engler ) A lawsuit filed in Denver district court by the Colorado River ecosystem asking to be recognized as a "person" is part of a growing global movement to forge a new kind of environmental law around the legal rights of nature. After all, if a corporation can be granted personhood, why not a river ecosystem that has sustained humans for thousands of years? The Colorado River runs through Grand Canyon National Park. (Photo: Jacalyn Engler ) Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this one: We depend on reader support! Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. The mighty Colorado River and its watersheds are a crucial source of life in the arid Southwest, supplying water to vast ecosystems and millions of people across seven states and northern Mexico. With so much depending on its existence, the Colorado River filed a groundbreaking lawsuit against the state of Colorado last month, demanding that its right to evolve, ...
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While Trump Opens National Parks to Fossil Fuel Drilling, Fee Hikes Would Lock Out Vacationing Families 26.10.2017 Truthout.com
(Photo: Screaming Monkey ; Edited: LW / TO)   Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! The National Parks, heralded by one former director as containing "the highest potentialities of national pride, national contentment, and national health," may soon be off-limits to many working American families due to price hikes that were proposed on Wednesday by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Citing the need to address maintenance and infrastructure concerns, the National Park Service said it wants to raise rates for vehicle passes from $25-30 to $70 during the busiest months of the year at some of the country's most popular parks, including the Grand Canyon, Yosemite, and Yellowstone. The price increases, which are subject to a  public comment period  open until November 23, follows the Trump administration's push to  redraw the boundaries  of several national monuments in the interest of those who Zinke said "rely on ...
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