User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Sep 02 2017 05:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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National monuments protect meaning, not just landscapes 2.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
If Bears Ears shrinks, it will be to our national cultural detriment.
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Excavation at Masol: 4 lakh owners for 400 acres of land, Mohali DC asks for revenue records 21.6.2017 Chandigarh – The Indian Express
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19 Epic, Endangered Places You Should Visit Before It's Too Late 14.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The world is full of beautiful places , but not all of them will stay that way . This week,  UNESCO released its annual state of conservation reports , which outline which of its famous designated  World Heritage Sites  are in danger of losing the historic, cultural or natural characteristics that made them World Heritage Sites in the first place. Places on the “ Danger List ” face threats like  soil erosion, lack of water and poor land management , to name a few. The World Heritage Committee prepares conservation reports for these places so it can discuss ways to better protect and conserve them if needed. Tourism can harm the world’s wonders , but it can also help them when done responsibly. Below, find 19 places from UNESCO’s conservation reports  that warrant a responsible visit. To compile this list, we pulled spots that appear on the Danger List , omitting any that come with travel warnings form the U.S. State Department . While such places are no less important, it’s not recommended that you visit ...
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Archaeologists are the last line of defense against destruction 8.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
You never know what you’ll find with a ‘detective of the land.’
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Of Science And Religion - Can Spiritual Values Of Forests Inspire Conservation? 25.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In his recent book EO Wilson advocates conserving half of the planet for one species (Homo sapiens) and the other half for the remaining millions of species. His list of “best places on the biosphere” worthy of saving include several sacred sites: the church forests of Ethiopia, the Western Ghats in India, natural areas of Bhutan, remnant forests in the Congo and Ghana, the redwoods of California, and the tepuis of Venezuela. All of these forests have spiritual value for the native people in the region, which has contributed to the safe-guarding of these landscapes more effectively than walls or monetary metrics. Sacred forests are a critical component of biodiversity conservation, yet remain difficult to account for in most western calculations of global biodiversity management. Such sacred regions have been fiercely protected by cultural and religious beliefs and taboos for many centuries. Further, many sacred sites are successfully maintained through traditional means of community-based conservation ...
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Trump Order Could Open Up Area Larger Than Yellowstone to Drilling 13.5.2017 Truthout.com
In addition to Bears Ears and Grand Staircase, monuments now threatened under Trump's newest decision to review national monument protections include Upper Missouri River Breaks in Montana and Carrizo Plain -- which is the last remnant of a vast grassland that once stretched across California. (Photo: Bureau of Land Management / Flickr ) More than 2.7 million acres of iconic US landscape could be at risk from fossil fuel exploration following Donald Trump's decision to review protections on national monuments, an Energydesk investigation can now reveal. Trump issued an executive order last month requiring the Department of Interior to review 27 monuments designated since 1996 -- suggesting they could pose a barrier to energy independence. Energydesk can now reveal that an area of protected land larger than Yellowstone national park could be at risk from drilling as a result -- with six national monuments affected by the executive order sitting above known or potential reserves of oil, gas and coal. The  ...
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Trump's Plan to Dismantle National Monuments Comes With Steep Cultural and Ecological Costs 8.5.2017 Truthout.com
In the few days since President Trump issued his Executive Order on National Monuments , many legal scholars have questioned the legality of his actions under the Antiquities Act. Indeed, if the president attempts to revoke or downsize a monument designation, such actions would be on shaky, if any, legal ground . But beyond President Trump's dubious reading of the Antiquities Act, his threats also implicate a suite of other cultural and ecological laws implemented within our national monuments. By opening a Department of Interior review of all large-scale monuments designated since 1996, Trump places at risk two decades' worth of financial and human investment in areas such as endangered species protection, ecosystem health, recognition of tribal interests and historical protection. Why Size Matters Trump's order suggests that larger-scale monuments such as Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, or the Missouri River Breaks National Monument in Montana, run afoul of the Antiquities Act because of their ...
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Trump's Plan To Dismantle National Monuments Comes With Steep Cultural And Ecological Costs 4.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Michelle Bryan & Monte Mills , The University of Montana , and Sandra B. Zellmer , University of Nebraska-Lincoln In the few days since President Trump issued his Executive Order on National Monuments , many legal scholars have questioned the legality of his actions under the Antiquities Act. Indeed, if the president attempts to revoke or downsize a monument designation, such actions would be on shaky, if any, legal ground . But beyond President Trump’s dubious reading of the Antiquities Act, his threats also implicate a suite of other cultural and ecological laws implemented within our national monuments. By opening a Department of Interior review of all large-scale monuments designated since 1996, Trump places at risk two decades’ worth of financial and human investment in areas such as endangered species protection, ecosystem health, recognition of tribal interests and historical protection. Why size matters Trump’s order suggests that larger-scale monuments such as Bears Ears National Monument in ...
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Latest: Zinke reopens Recapture Canyon to motor vehicles 1.5.2017 Current Issue
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How environmentalists could do more for Bears Ears 4.4.2017 High Country News Most Recent
On issues of industrial recreation, green groups say too little.
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Oil pipelines destroy jobs, too 22.2.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Sure pipelines are good for oil companies, but what about jobs related to preserving nature and culture?
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Missile Launchers at Standing Rock: Weaponized Law in Action 27.1.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Civil rights attorney Jeffrey Haas at Standing Rock in fall 2016. (Photo: Eric Deweese) Jeff Haas, an attorney with the Water Protector Legal Collective, speaks with Truthout about the draconian legal practices being employed against those at Standing Rock working to protect their water. "Law Enforcement was much less concerned with the constitutional rights of the citizens and more concerned with DAPL getting their pipeline constructed," he said. Civil rights attorney Jeffrey Haas at Standing Rock in fall 2016. (Photo: Eric Deweese) On Tuesday, January 24, President Donald Trump signed an order to move full steam ahead with the Dakota Access fracked oil pipeline (DAPL) at Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The move was a blow to the thousands of people who successfully resisted the pipeline through an Indigenous-led movement in which many people put their bodies on the line, spending months at camps outside Standing Rock. Trump's order will certainly lead to further resistance in the weeks and months to ...
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Canada 150 and the violation of an Algonquin Anishinaabe sacred site 25.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
trr_rpn_jan23-27_2017_chaudiere_history_sacred.mp3 On this week's episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with Lynn Gehl and Lindsay Lambert. Gehl is an Algonquin woman who traces her roots to the Ottawa River Valley, though she herself lives in Peterborough, Ontario. She holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies, and is a writer and activist. Lindsay Lambert is a white settler man, a historian, and also a writer. Both have been involved in the fight against the ongoing colonial development of the Chaudiere Falls and the three associated islands -- a sacred site to the Algonquin Anishinaabe people that is, in the year of Canada 150, slated to be turned into ...
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Canada 150 and the violation of an Algonquin Anishinabe sacred site 25.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
trr_rpn_jan23-27_2017_chaudiere_history_sacred.mp3 On this week's episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with Lynn Gehl and Lindsay Lambert. Gehl is an Algonquin woman who traces her roots to the Ottawa River Valley, though she herself lives in Peterborough, Ontario. She holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies, and is a writer and activist. Lindsay Lambert is a white settler man, a historian, and also a writer. Both have been involved in the fight against the ongoing colonial development of the Chaudiere Falls and the three associated islands -- a sacred site to the Algonquin Anishinabe people that is, in the year of Canada 150, slated to be turned into ...
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The End of a People: Amazon Dam Destroys Sacred Munduruku "Heaven" 19.1.2017 Truthout.com
Also see:  "One Day, We Will Win": The Fight to Protect Indigenous Lands From Brazil's Hydrodam Plans (Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil) The Tapajós River Basin lies at the heart of the Amazon, and at the heart of an exploding controversy: whether to build 40+ large dams, a railway, and highways, turning the Basin into a vast industrialized commodities export corridor; or to curb this development impulse and conserve one of the most biologically and culturally rich regions on the planet.  Those struggling to shape the Basin's fate hold conflicting opinions, but because the Tapajós is an isolated region, few of these views get aired in the media. Journalist Sue Branford and social scientist Mauricio Torres travelled there recently for Mongabay, and over coming weeks hope to shed some light on the heated debate that will shape the future of the Amazon.  "It is a time of death. The Munduruku ...
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Reconstruction Is Finally Getting The Historical Recognition It Deserves 14.1.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s base in Birmingham, Alabama. A bus station where anti-segregationists attacked Freedom Riders. These civil rights sites of the 1960s, etched in black-and-white images in our memories, are naturals for selection as national monuments. Less obvious, but perhaps more powerful in our nation’s history, is President Barack Obama ’s designation of Beaufort, South Carolina, a cradle of Reconstruction. Amid  Obama ’s last-minute flurry of executive orders and regulatory actions ― pardons, commutations, Arctic drilling bans ― Thursday’s dedication of the Beaufort monument seemed to fall in the shadow of the other two dedicated that day: the motel that served as King’s headquarters in the final push for the Voting Rights Act and the Anniston, Alabama, Greyhound station where a bus was firebombed in 1961. The monument in Beaufort commemorates a segment of the civil rights struggle that is far less prominent in American history. Beaufort’s Reconstruction Era National Monument will ...
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With more monuments, Republican backlash mounts 13.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A proposed bill moves to weaken executive power of the Antiquities Act.
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Lockdown at Trans-Pecos Pipeline Site in West Texas Consecrates New Indigenous-Led Resistance Camp 10.1.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Frankie Orona with the Society of Native Nations speaks with Truthout as an Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine, Texas, resident lock themselves to pipe-laying equipment, temporarily shutting the site down, Saturday, January 7, 2017. (Photo: Garrett Graham) An Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine, Texas, resident were arrested Saturday after locking themselves to pipe-laying equipment at a Trans-Pecos pipeline work site in Presidio County, Texas. The action is the first to be organized by a new Indigenous-led prayer and resistance camp set up in the Big Bend region to defend the pristine and ecologically sensitive land from the Energy Transfer Partner pipeline in solidarity with Standing Rock. Frankie Orona with the Society of Native Nations speaks with Truthout as an Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine, Texas, resident lock themselves to pipe-laying equipment, temporarily shutting the site down, Saturday, January 7, 2017. (Photo: Garrett Graham) An Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine, ...
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Seeking ancient lives in harsh lands 9.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A review of “The Lost World of the Old Ones,” a voyage through Southwestern archaeology.
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How the Park Service is failing women 12.12.2016 Current Issue
The agency tasked with safeguarding our greatest public lands has neglected to protect its workers.
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