User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Sep 20 2016 20:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Indians and Cowboys The 2016 Version of an Old Story on a New Planet 20.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Chip Ward

Cowboys and Indians are at it again.

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Indians And Cowboys: Last Stand At Standing Rock 20.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Cowboys and Indians are at it again.  Americans who don’t live in the West may think that the historic clash of Native Americans and pioneering settlers is long past because the Indians were, after all, defeated and now drive cars, watch television, and shop at Walmart.  Not so.  That classic American narrative is back big time, only the Indians are now the good guys and the cowboys -- well, their right-wing representatives, anyway -- are on the warpath, trying to grab 640 million acres of public lands that they can plunder as if it were yesteryear.  Meanwhile, in the Dakotas, America’s Manifest Destiny, that historic push across the Great Plains to the Pacific (murdering and pillaging along the way), seems to be making a return trip to Sioux country in a form that could have planetary consequences. Energy Transfer Partners is now building the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.7 billion oil slick of a project.  It’s slated to go from the Bakken gas and oil fracking fields in ...
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Standing Rock Warriors' Noble Fight for Mni Wiconi Endures 20.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Water protectors standing guard. Mists tell us winter is coming. An elder said "do not worry, spirits are dancing on the waters" Texas based Energy Transfer Inc. and its partners on the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) may have bulldozed ancient burial grounds, but the oil interests have not demolished the will of the self described "water protectors" supporting the Standing Rock Reservation. "Mni Wiconi" (water is life) is the prayerful battle cry of the thousands of protectors camped along the confluence of the Cannonball and Missouri Rivers in south central North Dakota. In July 2016 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave its approval for the pipeline to run within a half mile of the "official" boundary of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. There had been no proper consultation with or consent from the tribe on the pipeline scheduled to cross upstream, endangering drinking water, sacred treaty grounds, and therefore tribal identity. The People are in this for the long haul and last week offered them a mixed ...
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Mining Leaves a Wisconsin Tribe's Hallowed Sites at Risk 19.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Brian Bienkowski, Environmental Health News

Guy Reiter was an archaeologist before he was an activist. But the two merged after a dream six years ago.

“I was in a van and when we drove by the White Rapids I looked over and saw an elder sitting on a dam, in full Indian regalia,” Reiter says. “He flagged me down, I climbed the dam, and he started talking to me in Menominee.”

Menominee is the language of Reiter’s tribe, the Menominee Indians of Wisconsin. The dam is on the Menominee River, where the history of the tribe begins.

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Climate Justice Meets Racism: This Moment at Standing Rock Was Decades in the Making 19.9.2016 Truthout.com
Waves of arrests by police in riot gear could look like isolated incidents of overreaction to the activism stemming from the Standing Rock reservation. But for the Lakota Sioux who live in these marginalized hillsides, the escalated militarization they face is a situation decades in the making. Catcher Cuts The Road, an Iraq War veteran, leads a protest march to a sacred burial ground at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, on September 9, 2016. (Alyssa Schukar / The New York Times) If you believe our world needs more journalism covering the issues that matter, then show your support for independent media: Make a donation to Truthout today! Attack dogs and waves of arrests by police in riot gear could look like isolated incidents of overreaction to the activism stemming from the Standing Rock reservation. But for the Lakota Sioux who live in these marginalized hillsides, the escalated militarization behind their battle against the Dakota Access pipeline is a situation decades in the ...
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The Dakota Access Pipeline Is An Example Of A Much Bigger Problem 14.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline is showing no signs of losing momentum. Last week, protesters looking to block the construction of the massive oil pipeline in North Dakota scored a significant, if temporary, victory as three federal departments halted the project and placed it under review, overruling a federal judge’s denial of the tribe’s request for an emergency injunction. The protesters have argued that the pipeline construction will disturb sacred lands and burial grounds . In addition, the tribe is worried about the environmental impact of the pipeline, since it will run under the Missouri River, which supplies the tribe’s drinking water. The tribe has attracted thousands of supporters to its protest site, including representatives of more than 200 other tribes. Solidarity demonstrations have been held throughout the world. On Tuesday, Kelcy Warren, CEO of Energy Transfer Projects, the pipeline’s developer, defended the project that will transport oil across ...
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Pipeline Company Desecrates Graves On Sioux Sacred Land 14.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Metropolitan Community Churches know what it means to have our sacred sites defaced with spray-painted slurs. We know what it means to have our ministers murdered. We know what it means to be turned away from funeral homes because of who we are. We know what it feels like to have all we hold sacred desecrated. So we have some idea what the Sioux nation in Standing Rock Dakota and all the First Nations people gathered in the Dakotas are facing as they resist the desecration of their graves and sacred lands. When graffiti taggers deface gravestones with their mark -- or symbols of hate like swastikas, outcries and headlines condemn the scurrilous act. But in the Dakotas, Native American gravesites were bulldozed recently in a shocking act of grave desecration. The bulldozers cut a swath through historic grounds to destroy evidence of the graves and to stake corporate claim to the land as a preemptory act of violence instead of waiting for a pending court decision. The company brought in vicious dogs that ...
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Texas Tribes Mobilize in Solidarity With Sioux Against Dakota Access Pipeline 9.9.2016 Truthout.com
Indigenous activists with the Central Texas American Indian Movement protested in front of the Dallas headquarters of Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the Dakota Access pipeline, highlighting their own fight against that company's Trans-Pecos pipeline and its corporate ties. An Indigenous staff is planted in front of the corporate sign at Energy Transfer Partners headquarters in Dallas, Texas, during a rally in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux tribe resisting the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota, Friday, September 2, 2016. (Photo: Candice Bernd) As members of more than 100 tribal nations continue their historic standoff against the Dakota Access pipeline at the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota, Texas tribes protested in solidarity at the headquarters of the Dallas-based company behind the project -- Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) -- and spotlighted the company's conflicts of interest and corrupt practices in their own state. Just before poorly trained private ...
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Time For Obama and Clinton To Oppose The Dakota Access Pipeline 9.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Isaiah Poole

The fight between Native Americans and the financial interests dead set on pushing an environmentally hazardous oil pipeline through sacred Native lands in the Midwest intensified on Thursday, ahead of what is expected to be a climactic court decision Friday on whether work on the pipeline can proceed.

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A Pipeline Fight and America’s Dark Past 7.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Bill McKibben

This week, thousands of Native Americans, from more than a hundred tribes, have camped out on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, which straddles the border between the Dakotas, along the Missouri River. What began as a slow trickle of people a month ago is now an increasingly angry flood. They’re there to protest plans for a proposed oil pipeline that they say would contaminate the reservation’s water; in fact, they’re calling themselves protectors, not protesters.

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‘And Then the Dogs Came’: Dakota Access Gets Violent, Destroys Graves, Sacred Sites 6.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Sarah Sunshine Manning

"This demolition is devastating. These grounds are the resting places of our ancestors. The ancient cairns and stone prayer rings cannot be replaced. In one day, our sacred land has been turned into hollow ground." —Dave Archambault II, Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman

On the afternoon of September 3, a procession of prayerful water defenders, consisting of men, women, and children, walked on foot up to the original protest site where the first demonstrations took place in early August.

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DAPL Pipeline Interests Try Outrageous Fait Accompli and Destroy Ancient Sites 5.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Fait accompli (a thing that has already happened or been decided before those affected hear about it, leaving them with no option but to accept) Credit: Georgianne Nienaber Energy Transfer Inc. and invested owners of the proposed North Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), have begun psychological warfare against peaceful protestors near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. It will be a challenge for the persecuted to stay vigilant, stay strong and stay true to their beliefs. So far the People have remained nonviolent in the face of dog attacks on their bodies and their horses, while facing extreme psychic trauma in the form of desecration of graves and sacred sites. On Saturday "sacred places containing ancient burial sites, places of prayer and other significant cultural artifacts of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe were destroyed by Energy Transfer Partners," Tribal Chairman David Archambault II said in a press release . The tribal Chairman also has an op-ed in the New York Times that clearly lays out the ...
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Environmental, Tribal, Landowner Groups Urge President Obama to Repeal Permits for Dakota Access Pipeline 26.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Leading national and local environmental, tribal, and landowners’ rights organizations sent a letter to President Obama today expressing concern about the Army Corps of Engineers’ approval of some of the permits for the Dakota Access pipeline and urging him to direct the Corps to repeal those permits and not issue any further permits until it can be fully evaluated and held to the same standard as the Keystone XL pipeline.

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Indigenous Australians Fight Planned Nuclear Dump On Sacred Lands 19.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
(Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Enice Marsh remembers the black clouds of “poison stuff” that billowed from the northwest after British atomic bomb tests in the 1950s spread fallout across swathes of South Australia. Now a new kind of radioactivity could head to her ancestral home in the remote Flinders Ranges - a nuclear waste dump. “To me, it feels like a death penalty,” said Marsh, 73, standing in the cemetery of the outback town of Hawker, where many of her relatives are buried under red earth. “We are one big family and the land also is family to us. We care for the land just in the same way we care for our family.” South Australia is at the heart of a debate over the nation’s nuclear future that highlights a familiar tension between quick economic gain and long-term custodianship of land occupied by Aboriginal people for more than 50,000 years. Two separate proposals divide opinion in the state with the country’s biggest uranium mine and a history going back nearly 20 years of saying “no” to nuclear ...
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Settler solidarity against colonial urban development 3.8.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
trr_rpn_aug1-5_2016_stop_windmill.mp3 Like this podcast? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. On this week's episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with William Felepchuk and Brian McDougall. They are members of Stop Windmill: Student and Labour Allies for Akikodjiwan, a group that aims to bring predominantly non-Indigenous people together in support of Algonquin demands that a sacred site in the Ottawa river be protected from a proposed condominium development and returned to Algonquin ownership and ...
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GroundWire | Splatsin members oppose land transfer, River Run, Community Radio Awards 13.7.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
This episode of GW was produced by volunteers at Kootenay Co-operative Radio on Sinixt traditional territory in Nelson B.C. Headlines Government of British Columbia's 2016 Crown Contaminated Sites Report released | Catherine Fisher, CJLY Inquest into the deaths of seven First Nations youths | Carly Forbes, GroundWire Features Walk in opposition to condominium developments on a sacred site on unceded Algonquin Territory | Matt Cicero, CKCU/OPIRG Radio Splatsin community members opposed the transfer of land that is known to be an ancestral burial ground | Gunargie O'Sullivan, CFRO River Run protest in support of Grassy Narrows at Queen's Park in Toronto | Stephane Doucet, ...
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GroundWire | Splatsain members oppose land transfer, River Run, Community Radio Awards 13.7.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
This episode of GW was produced by volunteers at Kootenay Co-operative Radio on Sinixt traditional territory in Nelson B.C. Headlines Government of British Columbia's 2016 Crown Contaminated Sites Report released | Catherine Fisher, CJLY Inquest into the deaths of seven First Nations youths | Carly Forbes, GroundWire Features Walk in opposition to condominium developments on a sacred site on unceded Algonquin Territory | Matt Cicero, CKCU/OPIRG Radio Splatsain community members opposed the transfer of land that is known to be an ancestral burial ground | Gunargie O'Sullivan, CFRO River Run protest in support of Grassy Narrows at Queen's Park in Toronto | Stephane Doucet, ...
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Condominium development threatens protection of Algonquin sacred site 29.6.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Wednesday, June 29, 2016 "You don't develop an Algonquin sacred place," says Algonquin scholar and activist Lynn Gehl. So why is a proposed condo development continuing to be planned? Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. The fight to protect the sacred Chaudière Falls from a condominium development is gaining momentum following a massive sacred walk on Friday, June 17. The sacred walk, which was initiated by Algonquin Elders from Pikwàkanagàn, brought out approximately 500 people on the Friday afternoon. The day after the sacred march Stop Windmill, a group of non-native student and labour allies, called a rally for Monday, June ...
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Wildfire archeology exposes treasures of the dead 10.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Wyoming fires revealed long hidden historical artifacts.
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What we owe the people of Syria 3.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Never in recent history has the heritage of humanity known such devastation as now in Iraq and the Syrian Arab Republic. The deliberate destruction of the heritage is a war crime - it has become a tactic of war and propaganda. In Syria, two thirds of the Ancient City of Aleppo has been bombed out and burnt down. The sites of Dura-Europos and Apamea are being dismantled by industrial-scale trafficking in cultural property. Archaeological sites are caught in the crossfire between land troops and air forces, and used as military bases. Palmyra, inadequately protected for years, experienced absolute horror for over one year. There are a very large number of people responsible for this cultural and human chaos, and UNESCO condemns all destruction, no matter who the instigator. The main victim is the Syrian people. And in the midst of widespread impotence, it is the people of Syria who show the face of dignity and the meaning of the universal values conveyed by the heritage. I am thinking here of the work of ...
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