User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Jan 27 2017 22:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Missile Launchers at Standing Rock: Weaponized Law in Action 27.1.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Civil rights attorney Jeffrey Haas at Standing Rock in fall 2016. (Photo: Eric Deweese) Jeff Haas, an attorney with the Water Protector Legal Collective, speaks with Truthout about the draconian legal practices being employed against those at Standing Rock working to protect their water. "Law Enforcement was much less concerned with the constitutional rights of the citizens and more concerned with DAPL getting their pipeline constructed," he said. Civil rights attorney Jeffrey Haas at Standing Rock in fall 2016. (Photo: Eric Deweese) On Tuesday, January 24, President Donald Trump signed an order to move full steam ahead with the Dakota Access fracked oil pipeline (DAPL) at Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The move was a blow to the thousands of people who successfully resisted the pipeline through an Indigenous-led movement in which many people put their bodies on the line, spending months at camps outside Standing Rock. Trump's order will certainly lead to further resistance in the weeks and months to ...
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Canada 150 and the violation of an Algonquin Anishinaabe sacred site 25.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
trr_rpn_jan23-27_2017_chaudiere_history_sacred.mp3 On this week's episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with Lynn Gehl and Lindsay Lambert. Gehl is an Algonquin woman who traces her roots to the Ottawa River Valley, though she herself lives in Peterborough, Ontario. She holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies, and is a writer and activist. Lindsay Lambert is a white settler man, a historian, and also a writer. Both have been involved in the fight against the ongoing colonial development of the Chaudiere Falls and the three associated islands -- a sacred site to the Algonquin Anishinaabe people that is, in the year of Canada 150, slated to be turned into ...
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Canada 150 and the violation of an Algonquin Anishinabe sacred site 25.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
trr_rpn_jan23-27_2017_chaudiere_history_sacred.mp3 On this week's episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with Lynn Gehl and Lindsay Lambert. Gehl is an Algonquin woman who traces her roots to the Ottawa River Valley, though she herself lives in Peterborough, Ontario. She holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies, and is a writer and activist. Lindsay Lambert is a white settler man, a historian, and also a writer. Both have been involved in the fight against the ongoing colonial development of the Chaudiere Falls and the three associated islands -- a sacred site to the Algonquin Anishinabe people that is, in the year of Canada 150, slated to be turned into ...
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The End of a People: Amazon Dam Destroys Sacred Munduruku "Heaven" 19.1.2017 Truthout.com
Also see:  "One Day, We Will Win": The Fight to Protect Indigenous Lands From Brazil's Hydrodam Plans (Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil) The Tapajós River Basin lies at the heart of the Amazon, and at the heart of an exploding controversy: whether to build 40+ large dams, a railway, and highways, turning the Basin into a vast industrialized commodities export corridor; or to curb this development impulse and conserve one of the most biologically and culturally rich regions on the planet.  Those struggling to shape the Basin's fate hold conflicting opinions, but because the Tapajós is an isolated region, few of these views get aired in the media. Journalist Sue Branford and social scientist Mauricio Torres travelled there recently for Mongabay, and over coming weeks hope to shed some light on the heated debate that will shape the future of the Amazon.  "It is a time of death. The Munduruku ...
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Reconstruction Is Finally Getting The Historical Recognition It Deserves 14.1.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s base in Birmingham, Alabama. A bus station where anti-segregationists attacked Freedom Riders. These civil rights sites of the 1960s, etched in black-and-white images in our memories, are naturals for selection as national monuments. Less obvious, but perhaps more powerful in our nation’s history, is President Barack Obama ’s designation of Beaufort, South Carolina, a cradle of Reconstruction. Amid  Obama ’s last-minute flurry of executive orders and regulatory actions ― pardons, commutations, Arctic drilling bans ― Thursday’s dedication of the Beaufort monument seemed to fall in the shadow of the other two dedicated that day: the motel that served as King’s headquarters in the final push for the Voting Rights Act and the Anniston, Alabama, Greyhound station where a bus was firebombed in 1961. The monument in Beaufort commemorates a segment of the civil rights struggle that is far less prominent in American history. Beaufort’s Reconstruction Era National Monument will ...
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With more monuments, Republican backlash mounts 13.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A proposed bill moves to weaken executive power of the Antiquities Act.
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Lockdown at Trans-Pecos Pipeline Site in West Texas Consecrates New Indigenous-Led Resistance Camp 10.1.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Frankie Orona with the Society of Native Nations speaks with Truthout as an Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine, Texas, resident lock themselves to pipe-laying equipment, temporarily shutting the site down, Saturday, January 7, 2017. (Photo: Garrett Graham) An Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine, Texas, resident were arrested Saturday after locking themselves to pipe-laying equipment at a Trans-Pecos pipeline work site in Presidio County, Texas. The action is the first to be organized by a new Indigenous-led prayer and resistance camp set up in the Big Bend region to defend the pristine and ecologically sensitive land from the Energy Transfer Partner pipeline in solidarity with Standing Rock. Frankie Orona with the Society of Native Nations speaks with Truthout as an Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine, Texas, resident lock themselves to pipe-laying equipment, temporarily shutting the site down, Saturday, January 7, 2017. (Photo: Garrett Graham) An Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine, ...
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Seeking ancient lives in harsh lands 9.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A review of “The Lost World of the Old Ones,” a voyage through Southwestern archaeology.
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How the Park Service is failing women 12.12.2016 Current Issue
The agency tasked with safeguarding our greatest public lands has neglected to protect its workers.
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How the Archaeological Review Behind the Dakota Access Pipeline Went Wrong 1.12.2016 Truthout.com
This summer, Tim Mentz Sr.  took to YouTube  to tell the world about the destruction of his cultural heritage. A former tribal historic preservation officer of the Standing Rock Sioux, Mentz wore a baseball cap, rimless glasses and two thin braids of graying hair. He was upset and spoke rapidly about the area behind him, an expanse of the Great Plains cut by a new 150-foot-wide road. Two days before,  Mentz had testified  to the DC District Court to report the area that lay in the path of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) corridor holds 82 cultural features and 27 graves. By the next day, DAPL construction workers  graded the area . Behind where Mentz stood in the video was a place known as the Strong Heart Society Staff, where a sacred rattle or staff was placed within stone rings. Here members of the elite warrior society would come to make pledges. Mentz explained the site is tangible evidence that Strong Heart members followed a "spiritual path." As an anthropologist who has worked with ...
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Dear Chase Bank. It's Over. 30.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Law enforcement efforts to stop the water protectors at Standing Rock have taken a new turn: in the midst of the most severe weather since the camps were established, North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple has issued an "emergency evacuation order" of the largest camp, and is threatening to stop food and building materials from reaching the encampment. The water protectors have said they will not be moved off the land that is disputed under the Fort Laramie Treaty. Many thousands, from around the country and beyond, are siding with the water protectors, and next week, thousands of veterans plan to arrive to "stand with Standing Rock ." This nonviolent movement isn't budging in its efforts to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, a 1,172-mile proposed pipeline designed to transport a half million barrels of crude oil a day. The water protectors say the pipeline threatens drinking water for the nearby tribes and for millions who live downstream on the Missouri River. The Standing Rock Tribe, hundreds of other ...
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The misguided archaeological review behind the Dakota Access Pipeline 22.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
An archaeology professor explains how official reviews miss key tribal sites.
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How The Archaeological Review Behind The Dakota Access Pipeline Went Wrong 22.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
By Chip Colwell , University of Colorado Denver This summer, Tim Mentz Sr. took to YouTube to tell the world about the destruction of his cultural heritage. A former tribal historic preservation officer of the Standing Rock Sioux, Mentz wore a baseball cap, rimless glasses and two thin braids of graying hair. He was upset and spoke rapidly about the area behind him, an expanse of the Great Plains cut by a new 150-foot-wide road. Two days before, Mentz had testified to the D.C. District Court to report the area that lay in the path of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) corridor holds 82 cultural features and 27 graves. By the next day, DAPL construction workers graded the area . Behind where Mentz stood in the video was a place known as the Strong Heart Society Staff, where a sacred rattle or staff was placed within stone rings. Here members of the elite warrior society would come to make pledges. Mentz explained the site is tangible evidence that Strong Heart members followed a "spiritual ...
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Indigenous Representatives from Across the World Stand with Standing Rock During COP22 Marrakech 17.11.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

On November 17, 2016, Representatives of Indigenous Peoples from all regions of the world representing the International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change, as well as many international allies will raise their voices in solidarity with the Standing Rock Lakota Nation in their defense of Sacred Water, and say NO to the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) at a direct action inside of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP.

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Why Understanding the Native American Perspective Is Essential for Resolving the Dakota Access Pipeline Crisis 12.11.2016 Truthout.com
On Saturday, November 5, 2016, over a thousand participants took to the streets of New York City to march in support of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation. (Photo: Karla Anne Coté / Flickr ) In recent weeks, protests against the building of the Dakota Access Pipeline across North Dakota have escalated. Native American elders, families and children have set up tipis and tents on a campsite near the pipeline's path in the hope of stopping the pipeline's construction. Dave Archambault Jr.,  the leader of the  Standing Rock Sioux Tribe  that is leading the efforts to stop the pipeline, summed up what is at the heart of the issue. In a  brief two-minute statement  before the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland, he said, "Oil companies are causing deliberate destruction of our sacred places." As a Native American scholar of environmental history and religious studies, I am often asked what Native American leaders mean when they say that certain landscapes are "sacred places" or "sacred ...
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Amid 'Crisis and Scandal,' Global Banks Called to Stop Funding Dakota Access 8.11.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe says the Dakota Access pipeline threatens its sovereignty, drinking water, and sacred sites. (Photo: Paulann Egelhoff/flickr/cc)

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The Human Right To Water At Standing Rock 4.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As thousands of Indigenous people from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, other Native American tribes, and their allies continue their protest against the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL), corporate media have continued to focus almost exclusively on the presidential election. Most media ignored last week’s vicious attack on the Water Protectors, as they call themselves. The construction of the pipeline would violate the human right to peace, the right of Indigenous peoples to practice their cultural traditions, and several federal statutes. On October 27, more than 100 police from seven different states and the North Dakota National Guard, clad in riot gear and carrying automatic rifles, arrived in MRAPs [Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected military vehicles], Humvees and an armored police truck. They defended Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), the company behind the pipeline, and arrested 142 Water Protectors. That brings the total arrested since August to over 400. More than 40 people have been injured, and some ...
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The Human Right to Water at Standing Rock 3.11.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Phil Little Thunder Sr. carries water from his home, the Rosebud Reservation, during a protest march at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, September 9, 2016. (Photo: Alyssa Schukar / The New York Times) The Standing Rock Sioux protesting the Dakota Access pipeline are exercising their human right to safe drinking water. The international community, including the World Health Organization, has long recognized that access to safe water is closely linked to Indigenous peoples' control over their ancestral lands. Phil Little Thunder Sr. carries water from his home, the Rosebud Reservation, during a protest march at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, September 9, 2016. (Photo: Alyssa Schukar / The New York Times) As thousands of Indigenous people from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, other Native American tribes, and their allies continue their protest against the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL), corporate media have continued to focus almost exclusively on the presidential ...
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Standing Rock Chair: Obama Could Stop the Dakota Pipeline Today & Preserve Indigenous Sacred Sites 3.11.2016 Democracy Now!
President Obama says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering rerouting the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, amid months of resistance from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and members of more than 200 other Native American nations and tribes from across the Americas. "My view is that there is a way for us to accommodate sacred lands of Native Americans," Obama said. "And I think that right now the Army Corps is examining whether there are ways to reroute this pipeline in a way." Meanwhile, on Wednesday, police deployed pepper spray and tear gas against dozens of Native American water protectors during a standoff at Cantapeta Creek, north of the main resistance camp. At least two people were shot with nonlethal projectiles. Video and photos show police firing the pepper spray and tear gas at the water protectors, who were peacefully standing in the creek. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had ordered police to arrest the Native Americans and destroy a bridge that members of the camp had ...
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Building a Bridge to Turtle Island — Dispatch from Standing Rock 3.11.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Sarah van Gelder

Standing Rock (Nov. 2) — Drone footage taken of the ridge overlooking the camp showed that the water protecters worst fears had been realized. Construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline had reached just a quarter of a mile from the river, plowing through burial grounds and sacred sites of the Sioux people. And the only access to the construction site was via a bridge that has been closed since last Thursday’s confrontation with police. 

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