User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Jul 23 2015 08:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Apaches Rally At Capitol, Vowing To Continue Fighting For Sacred Oak Flat 23.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
   WASHINGTON -- Apache protesters completed their cross-country journey from the San Carlos reservation in Arizona to Washington, D.C., with a Wednesday rally on the lawn of the Capitol building, protesting Congress’ sale of their sacred Oak Flat to foreign mining conglomerates. The area known as Oak Flat is part of Arizona's Tonto National Forest, and the Apache have used it for generations in young women’s coming-of-age ceremonies. In 1955,  President Dwight Eisenhower  removed it from consideration for mining activities in recognition of its natural and cultural value. But in December 2014, during the final days of the previous Congress, Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) added a rider to the must-pass National Defense Authorization Act that opened the land to mining conglomerates  Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton. That change led to this week's protests in Washington. Wendsler Nosie Sr. and his granddaughter, 16-year-old Naelyn Pike, led the Apache Stronghold coalition with speeches, ...
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Apache Stronghold Caravan Calls to Protect Sacred Sites 20.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Members of the San Carlos Apache Tribe are fighting to preserve sacred sites in Arizona after lawmakers slipped a clause into the National Defense Authorization Act that would allow copper mining in the area. The land in question includes parts of Tonto National Forest, including Oak Flat and Devil's Canyon, and could also impact nearby Apache Leap, an important historic site where a group of Apache who were being pursued by US cavalry plunged off a cliff to their deaths rather than be captured. Resolution Copper Mining, a subsidiary of British-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto, has long sought ownership of the land. But the battle is not over. Earlier this month, a group called the Apache Stronghold began a caravan from Tucson, Arizona, to Washington, DC, to call for this land to once again be protected. On their way, they stopped in New York today and joined us in our studio. We speak with Wendsler Nosie Sr., Peridot District Council member and former chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe. He's the ...
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Efforts to save Utah's Cedar Mesa reach a crescendo 2.7.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Conflicting county and state proposals would provide various levels of protection.
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On the Road to Red Rock 20.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
On the road again! School was hardly out before the family and I had our camping gear packed into the rental minivan. Time for another western adventure to visit and learn about some of the public lands that the Sierra Club and others are working to protect. Where to this year? As a parent, I would never single out one child as my favorite. As executive director of the Sierra Club, I would never say that I love one part of Our Wild America more than the others, but...  we started this year's trip by heading back to the red rock lands of southern Utah that we visited two years ago. The dry canyons and mesas can seem forbidding, but their stark beauty is unassailable. Our first big stop was the Four Corners region of southeastern Utah, where we had the privilege of meeting with members of the local Navajo and Ute Mountain Ute tribal communities. Local tribes have deep ties to the lands here. They live, work and practice their traditions on this land. They and the other tribes of the Four Corners area are ...
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Sacred Statues Destroyed By The Taliban Return As Ghostly Projections 12.6.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A pair of sacred statues that the Taliban destroyed in Afghanistan have been recreated by enormous 3-D light projections. The Sunni Muslim Taliban forces blew up the Buddha statues in March 2001 as an act of religious terror. Leader Mullah Omar declared that they were false idols and forced local workers to blow them up. The statues were carved into cliffs in Afghanistan's Bamiyan Valley, a World Heritage Site , about 1,500 years ago , and have lay in rubble for more than a decade. Chinese documentarians Janson Yu and Liyan Hu created huge projections of the statues over the weekend, according to The Atlantic . They journeyed to the Bamiyan Valley after UNESCO and the Afghan government gave them permission to debut their work. This photo taken on June 7, 2015, shows the projected image of a Buddha statue in the Bamiyan Valley. The ghostly 3-D light projections filled the one hundred-foot high cutouts in the mountains where the original stone statues once stood. Over 150 people watched the spectacle , The ...
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Expelled for Life: A Palestinian Family's Struggle to Stay on Their Land 12.6.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Expelled for Life: A Palestinian Family's Struggle to Stay on Their Land 11.6.2015 Truthout.com
Nasser Nawaj'ah was only four years old in June 1986 when, after the remains of an ancient synagogue were discovered in Old Susya, Israel's Civil Administration - the military body through which it manages the Occupied Palestinian Territories -  expropriated the village. Nasser (left) and Laith Nawaj'ah. (Photo: Jen Marlowe) Nasser Nawaj'ah held Laith's hand as, beside me, they walked down the dirt and pebble path of Old Susya. Nasser is 33 years old, his son six. Nasser's jaw was set and every few moments he glanced over his shoulder to see if anyone was approaching. Until Laith piped up with his question, the only sounds were our footsteps and the wind, against which Nasser was wearing a wool hat and a pleated brown jacket. "Why did they take our home?" the little boy asked. "Why did they take it? Good question," replied Nasser, pausing to choose his words carefully. "They don't want Palestinians. They don't want us here." Laith was, in fact, asking about something that had happened 29 years ago when ...
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Film That May Show Amelia Earhart Moments Before Last Flight Revealed 9.6.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
LOS ANGELES (AP) — It was a clear spring day in 1937 when Amelia Earhart, ready to make history by flying around the world, brought her personal photographer to a small Southern California airport to document the journey's beginning. Al Bresnik took dozens of still photos, including a few that have likely been seen by millions. His brother John, who tagged along, made a very dark, grainy 3.5-minute home movie almost nobody saw — until now. The film, "Amelia Earhart's Last Photo Shoot," is being released this month by The Paragon Agency publishing house, along with an 80-page book of the same name that documents a journey that ended tragically short of the finish line when Earhart's plane vanished somewhere over the Pacific Ocean. A downloadable copy of the film is being provided to those who buy the book. Paragon publisher Doug Westfall said he eventually plans to donate the fragile original given to him by John Bresnik's son to an archive or museum. The film, taken with a millimeter camera, sat on a ...
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Is Enbridge's Pipeline Treaty with Minnesota an Offering from a Trickster? 8.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sometimes you find yourself in exactly the right place at the right time, even when it seems events have conspired to thwart desire. For months, I had planned a camping trip to the far western regions of the Great Plains. Spring offered the opportunity for spiritual renewal at the Native American sacred sites of Wyoming's Devils Tower and South Dakota's Wind Cave. I was completely dismayed and frustrated to learn that while I was a day's drive from Minnesota, 5000 people would be gathering in Minneapolis/St. Paul to protest the Tar Sands pipeline expansions through the upper Midwest. Coincidentally, the decision of the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission to grant a certificate of need to the Enbridge Corporation for the controversial Sandpiper Pipeline, which would carry Bakken oil crude, was also on the minds of the rally organizers and participants. All that remains is the decision on routing, but opponents say there is no upside to a pipeline that threatens Native Treaty lands and the health and ...
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Wyoming acts to discourage citizen scientists 27.5.2015 High Country News Most Recent
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Immigrant Couple, Including Husband Who Fled Nazis, Leaves Estate To 'America' 23.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A married couple from Seattle, including a husband who had fled Nazi persecution, made it their last wish that Uncle Sam inherit their entire estate. In identical wills, immigrants Peter and Joan Petrasek, who had no known relatives, left all of their money and assets to " the government of the United States of America ," ABC News reported on Thursday. Last month, a cashier check totaling $847,215.57 was made out to the Department of the Treasury. Joan died in 1998 at age 79 from breast cancer. Peter lived another 14 years, dying in 2012 at age 85. It took a lawyer a few years to fulfill the couple's request of donating their estate to the government. "[Peter Petrasek] wanted to make a statement about how much it meant to him to be an American citizen," said Peter Winn , an assistant U.S. attorney who handled the couple's donation. The government deposited the money into its general fund. It was a winding path that led the couple to each other and ultimately to the Pacific Northwest. Peter was born in ...
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Discovery Of World's Oldest Stone Tools Overturns Traditional View Of Early Humans 20.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Archaeologists working in northwestern Kenya say they've unearthed the world's oldest stone tools yet -- and the discovery has thrown them for a loop. Dating back 3.3 million years, the artifacts push back the archaeological record of tool technology by a staggering 700,000 years. That suggests tools were being fashioned even before the emergence of Homo -- the genus to which Neanderthals and modern humans belong (scroll down for photos). "This discovery is important because the traditional view for decades was that the earliest stone tools were made by the first members of Homo, both dating to around 2.4 to 2.6 million years ago," Dr. Sonia Harmand , an archaeologist at Stony Brook University and the lead researcher, told The Huffington Post in an email. "The idea was that our lineage alone took the cognitive leap of hitting stones together to strike off sharp flakes and that this was the foundation of our evolutionary success." (Story continues below slideshow.) A special feeling. The first tools were ...
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Recapture Canyon protesters found guilty in Utah 4.5.2015 High Country News Most Recent
County commissioner and co-defendant face up to a year in jail for illegal ATV ride.
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Syria's Historical Artifacts Aren't Just Being Destroyed By ISIS, They're Being Looted 13.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Every week, we bring you one overlooked aspect of the stories that made news in recent days. You noticed the media forgot all about another story's basic facts? Tweet @TheWorldPost or let us know on our Facebook page . The first reports that Islamic State militants were destroying cultural heritage sites came soon after the group seized large swaths of Iraq and Syria last year. Such accounts have since become commonplace. The famed ancient Assyrian capital of Khorsabad, which had survived for 2,700 years, was reportedly ransacked and razed this month. Also in March, militants reportedly bulldozed the ancient city of Nimrud, and leveled the 2000-year-old city of Hatra. A shrine believed to be the tomb of biblical figure Jonah was blown up in July as onlookers wept. In the extremist-held city of Mosul, thousands of books have been burned . Videos posted online show militants smashing artifacts in the Mosul Museum. The list of lost treasures goes on. The Islamic State group, motivated by a violent ...
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Truly An Ancient 'Lost City' Or Sensational Reporting? Scholars Claim Honduran Discovery Was Overhyped 12.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A so-called “lost city” said to be home to a long-vanished civilization was reportedly found by a team of explorers in the rainforest of La Mosquitia, Honduras, during a recent expedition. The finding, which was first reported in National Geographic and picked up by other media outlets including The Huffington Post, has since generated a lot of buzz -- and criticism. Earlier this month, more than two dozen archaeologists and anthropologists published an open letter , condemning the explorers, who were accompanied by a film crew, for making “exaggerated claims of ‘discovery.'” Experts have also criticized National Geographic for sensationalizing the finding and employing a “colonialist discourse” in their report. The National Geographic article , published March 2, began with these words: An expedition to Honduras has emerged from the jungle with dramatic news of the discovery of a mysterious culture’s lost city, never before explored. The team was led to the remote, uninhabited region by long-standing ...
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Ancient Stone Tool Brings New Ideas About Early Americans 9.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
An ancient stone tool recently discovered in the high desert of southeast Oregon has archaeologists raising their eyebrows. The tool, a hand-held scraper chipped from a piece of agate, was unearthed from beneath a layer of volcanic ash near the Rimrock Draw Rockshelter outside Riley, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management announced on Thursday. Archaeologists have linked the ash to a major eruption from Mount St. Helens that occurred about 15,800 years ago. “When we had the volcanic ash identified, we were stunned because that would make this stone tool one of the oldest artifacts in North America ," Dr. Patrick O’Grady, an archaeologist at the University of Oregon and the leader of the excavation, said in a written statement. "Given those circumstances and the laws of stratigraphy, this object should be older than the ash.” (Story continues below photo.) The scraper was found at an ancient rock shelter in the high desert of eastern Oregon. It could turn out to be older than any known site of human ...
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Ancient City, Once Home To A Long-Lost Civilization, Found In Honduras Rainforest 4.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A team of archaeologists were searching for the fabled “ White City ,” also known as the “City of the Monkey God,” in the Honduras jungle. But during the course of their hunt, they say they may have stumbled upon something far more remarkable: not merely a long-lost city, but an entire, unidentified civilization . The story of this discovery begins in 2012 when an aerial survey of a remote valley in La Mosquitia, Honduras , revealed evidence of the ruins of a pre-Columbian city. As National Geographic notes, some experts thought the ruins might be part of the legendary “White City.” This “mystical, Eden-like paradise,” which has captivated explorers for at least a century, was described in indigenous stories as a place where Indians were said to have hidden from Spanish conquistadores. The site of the “White City” has never been confirmed. Trees are still thick within a pocket of jungle in the Mosquitia that is home to the ruins of an ancient civilization. With the support of the Honduran government, the ...
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Ancient Cod Bones Carry Modern Warning About Mercury, Climate Change 2.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Ancient cod bones unearthed at an Alaska archaeological site carry a very modern warning for a world with a rapidly changing climate -- as sea levels rise, so do levels of mercury in the food chain. The bones, discovered at a coastal site in Katmai National Park and Preserve, date back to the early and mid-Holocene, a time when a warming climate melted glaciers and expanded the oceans. The rising seas inundating the Bering Land Bridge and other stretches of terrain caused some of the naturally occurring mercury that was locked in dry or frozen land to get free and disperse in the expanded marine waters. The high levels of mercury in the cod bones are described in a study published in the journal Frontiers in Environmental Science. After the end of the last Ice Age, sea levels inched up gradually, reaching their current level about 4,000 years ago. The cod bones, found among the trash dumped at an ancient human dwelling site, date back to that time and earlier. Examination of the cod bones shows that ...
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Sierra Club Praises National Monument Designations 18.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Marcellus Life: A Native American Protest to Stop a Pennsylvania Pipeline 11.2.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Chief Carlos Whitewolf beat a small hand drum and sang a Native American prayer for Mother Earth in the cold January air in Hershey, Pa. Many of the 50 or so other protesters outside the Hershey Lodge, where national Republican leaders attended a retreat, demonstrated against issues like the Keystone XL pipeline and climate change. But Whitewolf, chief of the Northern Arawak Tribal Nation of Pennsylvania, was objecting to something more local. In nearby Lancaster County, it’s the  Atlantic Sunrise pipeline project . Whitewolf calls the project “disrespectful” because the pipeline’s current route goes through parts of southwestern Lancaster County rich with ancient Native American artifacts and burial sites. The project is a proposed expansion of a natural gas pipeline that would traverse about 190 miles, through 10 Pennsylvania counties: Lancaster, Columbia, Lebanon, Luzerne, Northumberland, Schuylkill, Susquehanna, Wyoming, Clinton and Lycoming counties. Opposition has been strongest in Lancaster ...
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