User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Apr 11 2014 19:10 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Drones Reveal Hidden Ancient Village Buried In New Mexico 11.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Thermal images captured by a small drone allowed archaeologists to peer under the surface of the New Mexican desert floor, revealing never-before-seen structures in an ancient Native American settlement. Called Blue J, this 1,000-year-old village was first identified by archaeologists in the 1970s. It sits about 43 miles (70 kilometers) south of the famed Chaco Canyon site in northwestern New Mexico and contains nearly 60 ancestral Puebloan houses around what was once a large spring. Now, the ruins of Blue J are obscured by vegetation and buried in eroded sandstone blown in from nearby cliffs. The ancient structures have been only partially studied through excavations. Last June, a team of archaeologists flew a small camera-equipped drone over the site to find out what infrared images might reveal under the surface. [ Chaco Canyon Photos: The Center of an Ancient World ] "I was really pleased with the results," said Jesse Casana, an archaeologist from the University of Arkansas. "This work illustrates ...
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Unearthing of large tusk in Arabian Desert suggests once greener pastures 4.4.2014 Environmental News Network
Working in conjunction with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities, researchers from the University of Oxford have discovered two pieces of a tusk that when combined measure six feet in length. The researchers believe it is from a Palaeoloxodon or a "straight tusked elephant". An elephant's carpal bone was recovered in a separate study done by a Swiss team in the Nefud Desert just five meters away. The sand layer dates back to approximately 325,000 years and the elephant is believed to be of the same age.
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Viking 'Compass' Suggests Medieval Mariners Could Navigate After Sunset 26.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Often regarded as ruthless robbers, the Vikings were also impressive mariners capable of traversing the North Atlantic along a nearly straight line. Now, new interpretations of a medieval compass suggest the sea robbers may have skillfully used the sun to operate the compass even when the sun had set below the horizon. The remains of the supposed compass — known as the Uunartoq disc — were found in Greenland in 1948 in an 11th-century convent. Though some researchers originally argued it was simply a decorative object, other researchers have suggested the disc was an important navigational tool that the Vikings would have used in their roughly 1,600-mile-long (2,500 kilometers) trek from Norway to Greenland. Though only half of the wooden disc remains, it is estimated to have been roughly 2.8 inches (7 centimeters) in diameter with a now-lost central pin that would have cast a shadow from the sun indicative of a cardinal direction. [ Images: Viking Twilight Compass Helps Navigate North ...
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Los Angeles Subway Dig Uncovers Treasure Trove Of Prehistoric Fossils 16.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Los Angeles Subway Dig Uncovers Treasure Trove Of Prehistoric Fossils
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22 Places In Ireland To Celebrate The Emerald Isle 6.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
22 Places In Ireland To Celebrate The Emerald Isle
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Long-Term Drought Doomed Indus Valley Civilization, Researchers Say 4.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The decline of Bronze-Age civilizations in Egypt, Greece and Mesopotamia has been attributed to a long-term drought that began around 2000 bc . Now palaeoclimatologists propose that a similar fate was followed by the enigmatic Indus Valley Civilization, at about the same time. Based on isotope data from the sediment of an ancient lake, the researchers suggest that the monsoon cycle, which is vital to the livelihood of all of South Asia, essentially stopped there for as long as two centuries. The Indus Valley, in present Pakistan and northwest India, was home to a civilization also known as the Harappan Civilization. It was characterized by large, well-planned cities with advanced municipal sanitation systems and a script that has never been deciphered. But the Harappans seemed to slowly lose their urban cohesion, and their cities were gradually abandoned. The link between this gradual decline and climate has been tenuous because of a dearth of climate records from the region. So Yama ...
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Pompeii Wall Collapses After Days Of Heavy Rain At Ancient Site 3.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Pompeii Wall Collapses After Days Of Heavy Rain At Ancient Site
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Recapture Canyon and an illegal ATV trail 13.2.2014 Writers on the Range
A Utah county attempts to gain right of way on public land.
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Glass Bottle Found After Being Dumped By Oceanographer In 1956 8.2.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Glass Bottle Found After Being Dumped By Oceanographer In 1956
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World's Oldest Roman Temple Believed Uncovered In Italy (PHOTOS) 2.2.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The site thus offers both an important glimpse at the earliest phases of occupation at Rome in the latter half of the second millennium and an unparalleled opportunity to study the development of a major cult area in relation to the processes of urbanization and state formation from the eighth to the sixth centuries. ...
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100-Year-Old Photos From Lost Antarctic Expedition Unveiled 31.12.2013 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the restored images taken from the deck of the Aurora, looking south to Hut Point Peninsula. One of the restored images of Big Razorback Island, McMurdo Sound, most likely taken from the deck of the Aurora in January 1915. Alexander Stevens, chief scientist on board the Aurora, who was later stranded at Cape Evans. ...
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Mysterious Shipwreck May Have Inspired Early Coast Guard (VIDEO) 16.11.2013 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Mysterious Shipwreck May Have Inspired Early Coast Guard (VIDEO)
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Hurricane Raymond: Storm Upgrades In Pacific 27.10.2013 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
MIAMI -- MIAMI (AP) — The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Raymond has become a hurricane far off Mexico's Pacific coast and poses no threat to land at this time.

The Miami-based center says Raymond has top sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph) and is centered about 735 miles (1,180 kilometers) south-southwest of the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California peninsula. The hurricane is moving toward the west-northwest at 10 mph (17 kph). No coastal watches or warnings are in effect.

The hurricane center says some additional strengthening is forecast Sunday and gradual weakening of the storm is expected to begin by Monday.
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Stories from California: Connecting Past & Present 1.10.2013 187 Main Street
Stories from California: Connecting Past & Present
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Beachcomber Finds Oldest Message In A Bottle ... But Won't Open It? 24.9.2013 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Beachcomber Finds Oldest Message In A Bottle ... But Won't Open It?
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Ruth Kirk, pioneering guidebook author 14.9.2013 High Country News Most Recent
A natural and human histories expert of the West reflects on her work.
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PHOTOS: 5 National Park Sites to See Over Labor Day 2.9.2013 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Megan Gannon, LiveScience News Editor: Looking for a last-minute Labor Day getaway? Visiting one of the nation's great natural wonders, monuments or historic sites...
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Girl Power! Women Ruled Brutal Ancient Culture? 24.8.2013 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Talk about ancient girl power! Archaeologists working in Peru have uncovered the skeleton of a woman believed to have been a high priestess of a...
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REDD+: What you see isn't always what you get 5.8.2013 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com

A global nonprofit follows the money trail of climate finance in six counties to ensure it doesn't slip into the wrong bank account.

REDD+: What you see isn't always what you get
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Snail Study Points To Mysterious Migration In Ancient Europe 22.6.2013 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A variety of snails common in western Ireland may have been transported there by humans during the Stone Age, a new study suggests. Cepaea...
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