User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Nov 07 2014 03:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 188    
The 'Human' Quality We Share With Baboons 7.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As humankind has evolved, we've built cities and computers, probed into the far reaches of our galaxy and beyond, cured diseases, and developed thousands of different languages and dialects with which to communicate with each other. These momentous achievements were made possible by the human capacity for "cumulative culture" -- the ability to build up knowledge over generations. As Sir Isaac Newton described his own formulation of the laws of motion and universal gravitation, "If I have seen further, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." There has been some debate over whether or not this ability is uniquely human . But a new study from the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and the University of Edinburgh has found that baboons share some capacity to build up, transmit and make use of small changes in their collective culture over the course of generations. The researchers studied groups of baboons living at the CNRS Primatology Center in Rousset, France. The baboons had ...
Also found in: [+]
Now We Know What Killed The Ancient 'Ice Princess,' And Why She Had That Marijuana 16.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Did a dying Siberian maiden who lived 2,500 years ago self-medicate with marijuana? New research by Russian scientists shows that's a likely possibility. The mummified body of the Siberian "ice princess" -- so well preserved that tattoos on her skin were still visible when she was found -- was unearthed in an icy plateau in eastern Russia's Altai Mountains back in 1993. Since then, scientists have gained a good understanding of who the ice princess was , and how she and her people lived. But no one knew for sure how the woman, who's believed to have been in her 20s when she died back in the 5th Century B.C., met her end. Until now. To solve the mystery, a team of Russian scientists using MRI scans determined that the ice princess was likely suffering from breast cancer . “We are dealing with a primary tumor in the right breast and right axial lymph nodes with metastases,” team member Andrey Letyagin told the Siberian Times. “I am quite sure of the diagnosis -- she had cancer.” (Story continues below ...
Also found in: [+]
Ancient Village Discovered In Petrified Forest National Park 14.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Land that now belongs to the Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona may have been the site of bustling communities around 1,300 years ago. Archaeologists working in the park have unearthed a second ancient village less than a kilometer away from one that was discovered last summer, The Christian Science Monitor reported. The newfound village, which was discovered in July, may have contained up to 75 individual homes inhabited by ancient Pueblo peoples. “Finding smaller sites is pretty common but to find these larger sites with 50 to 75 structures is more unique,” park archaeologist Bill Reitze told the Monitor. “That’s what makes it interesting and there are some really interesting things to learn.” Those housing structures suggest that 100 to 125 people lived in the village at any one time , USA Today reported. (Story continues below) This small, slab-lined bin was unearthed at the village site. (Notice the scale, with one-centimeter increments). Scientists are not sure what it was used for, but it ...
Also found in: [+]
Carry a Torch 25.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"Many Native people would say this needs to be burned." Rob Cuthrell, having just the weekend before become a newly minted doctor of archaeology, looked down from the edge of the 225-acre Quiroste Valley Cultural Preserve in Año Nuevo State Park north of Santa Cruz. We stood on the site of the ancient village Mitinne, once populated by the strong Quiroste polity who fatefully intersected here with the Spanish nearly 245 years ago. Down below was a familiar expanse of dried grasses interspersed with coyote brush and rimmed by Douglas fir trees. It looked a lot like many other wide-open expanses of California coast protected from development and home to many native species. Untouched land looks natural. But it's not, really. Nor, perhaps, has it ever been, at least on the terms that we usually define the word "natural." Around the hilltop on which we stood, Cuthrell pointed out purple needlegrass, the official California state grass. "This is a main constituent of coastal prairies," he said. "I was up here ...
Also found in: [+]
Secrets of the Past in a Rugged Landscape 24.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"Greater Canyonlands holds some of the most scientifically important cultural resources to be found anywhere in North America," says professional archaeologist and author Jerry D. Spangler. "To venture into this landscape - as anyone willing to tread lightly and respectfully can do - is to walk through time with wonder and awe, marveling at the secrets of our collective past." Secrets of the Past in a Rugged Land: The archaeological case for protecting Greater Canyonlands takes the reader through 12,000 years of human history embedded in that landscape, offering highlights of the remarkable artifacts left behind by ancient inhabitants. The publication also outlines the numerous threats to this extraordinary region - from encroaching development and resource extraction to poorly regulated off-road vehicle use - and calls for monument designation to protect the area's cultural treasures. Greater Canyonlands in southern Utah is not only one of the last great untouched frontiers of the American West. It is ...
Also found in: [+]
Winnemem Wintu War Dancers: Shasta Dam a "Weapon of Mass Destruction" 17.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Also found in: [+]
It's a peach of a story 7.9.2014 Earth Times
How did the peach become selected from the typical forest tree. Was it developed like many fruits as a recent addition to food habits, or did it become domesticated early, like the goat, the dog and the pig, to provide a rich varied diet for early agriculturalists?
Also found in: [+]
Languages Are Going Extinct Even Faster Than Species Are 3.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The world's roughly 7000 known languages are disappearing faster than species, with a different tongue dying approximately every 2 weeks. Now, by borrowing methods used in ecology to track endangered species, researchers have identified the primary threat to linguistic diversity: economic development. Though such growth has been shown to wipe out language in the past on a case-by-case basis, this is the first study to demonstrate that it is a global phenomenon, researchers say. Many people know about the threatened polar bear and extinct passenger pigeon, but few have heard of endangered and extinct languages such as Eyak in Alaska, whose last speaker died in 2008, or Ubykh in Turkey, whose last fluent speaker died in 1992, says Tatsuya Amano, a zoologist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom and lead author of the new study. It’s well known that economic growth or the desire to achieve it can drive language loss, he notes—dominant languages such as Mandarin Chinese and English are often ...
Also found in: [+]
'Pristine' Mammoth Skeleton Unearthed In Texas 28.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Marty McEwen was digging in the dirt on his dad's North Texas property in May when the excavator suddenly hit something. That something turned out to be a six-foot tusk -- of a mammoth that had walked the earth tens of thousands of years ago . Then, as if finding a mammoth tusk on one's property wasn't spectacular enough, McEwen and his dad, Wayne, soon discovered that it wasn't just the tusk that was buried on their family's land but the animal's nearly complete skeleton -- in pristine condition, no less. The skeleton is believed to belong to a female Colombian mammoth that stood approximately 8 to 9 feet tall at the shoulder. It's estimated to be 20,000 to 60,000 years old . Experts called the skeleton -- which is reportedly 90 percent complete -- an "outstanding find." "We get a lot of mammoth fossils in Texas but it's usually a tooth here, a tusk there or a piece of jaw," Ron Tykoski, a paleontologist with the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, told Reuters. "This is unusual. It looks like ...
Also found in: [+]
Leave a lighter footprint: green funeral and burial tips 7.7.2014 TreeHugger
If you lead a green life, you can also make arrangements for a green death. Here are 10 tips for green funerals.
Also found in: [+]
Archaeological expedition reveals first fossil-record evidence of forest fire ecology 6.6.2014 Environmental News Network
Fossils can reveal an incredible amount of information. From what kind of organisms lived when and where to how they may have evolved over time. And now a new discovery of plant fossils with abundant fossilized charcoal reveals something new about prehistoric forest fires. Forest fires affect ecosystems differently and despite the fact that organisms and plant life have had to adapt to cope with these natural phenomena, new research shows that forests have been recovering from fires in the same manner as they did 66 million years ago.
Also found in: [+]
This Is The Most Spiritual Place In Your Home State 29.5.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Spiritual enlightenment is a great reason for a road trip this summer (as if any reason were needed). In order to help you on your path we have compiled a completely subjective list of the holiest places in America - one in each 50 states. Which are your favorites? Let us know in the comments. And if you visit any of these sacred sites tweet us your photos at @HuffPostRelig ! Alabama Congregation Sha'arai Shomayim / Springhill Avenue Temple, Mobile This Sephardic Jewish congregation is the oldest in the state of Alabama, and one of the oldest in the whole of the United States. It was organized in Mobile on January 25, 1844, and secured land for the cemetery in 1876. A new location on Springhill Avenue was dedicated in 1955, where the congregation resides to this day. Alaska Mount Denali Also known as Mount McKinley, this peak is the highest peak in North America and holds great significance within the native traditions. "Denali" is translated as "the great one" in the Athabaskan languages of the Alaska ...
Also found in: [+]
Spanish Conquest Altered Peru's Shoreline, New Research Shows 22.5.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In 1532, Francisco Pizarro led an expedition of battle-hardened Spanish soldiers on a fateful journey, from the desert coast of northern Peru to the highland Inca city of Cajamarca. A civil war had just ended in the Inca Empire, and Pizarro and a party of fewer than 200 men marched eastward to capitalize on the turmoil. The ensuing Spanish conquest of the Inca had a profound effect on the region’s indigenous people, but a new paper published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that it also had an unexpected impact on the land itself . Before the Spaniards arrived, inhabitants of the arid northern Peruvian coast clad massive sand dune–like ridges with an accidental form of “armor”: millions of discarded mollusk shells, which protected the ridges from erosion for nearly 4700 years and produced a vast corrugated landscape that “is visible from space,” says archaeologist Dan Sandweiss of the University of Maine, Orono, one of the paper’s authors. Archaeologist Dan Sandweiss ...
Also found in: [+]
A reluctant rebellion in the Utah desert 14.5.2014 High Country News Most Recent
For ATVers at Recapture Canyon, realpolitik meets out-of-town zeal.
Also found in: [+]
Time to Smack Down Trespassing Vigilantes and Thugs 13.5.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
"This land is your land, this land is my land," Woody Guthrie, 1952. "This is OUR land," Jarbidge Shovel Brigade Official Web Site, 2002. On Sept. 1, 1846, my great-grandfather's great-grandfather camped with his family in a place that is now the outskirts of Elko, Nevada. It was a silent night. There were no roads for hundreds of miles. It would be over a half century before the first automobile would be built. It would be a full century before Cliven Bundy's father would begin grazing cattle on the federal land that pioneers like my ancestors conquered. Things have changed since the 1840s. Today, only the most inaccessible fragments of our shared land are unmarred by intrusions. The few remaining wild, roadless areas are special, spectacular places, with untracked deserts, grassy prairies, and healthy forests. Wildlife and archaeological sites are protected by isolation, and people can visit for solitude and rejuvenation. This land is your land. Without protection, roads and development will eventually ...
Also found in: [+]
Drones Reveal Hidden Ancient Village Buried In New Mexico 11.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Thermal images captured by a small drone allowed archaeologists to peer under the surface of the New Mexican desert floor, revealing never-before-seen structures in an ancient Native American settlement. Called Blue J, this 1,000-year-old village was first identified by archaeologists in the 1970s. It sits about 43 miles (70 kilometers) south of the famed Chaco Canyon site in northwestern New Mexico and contains nearly 60 ancestral Puebloan houses around what was once a large spring. Now, the ruins of Blue J are obscured by vegetation and buried in eroded sandstone blown in from nearby cliffs. The ancient structures have been only partially studied through excavations. Last June, a team of archaeologists flew a small camera-equipped drone over the site to find out what infrared images might reveal under the surface. [ Chaco Canyon Photos: The Center of an Ancient World ] "I was really pleased with the results," said Jesse Casana, an archaeologist from the University of Arkansas. "This work illustrates ...
Also found in: [+]
Unearthing of large tusk in Arabian Desert suggests once greener pastures 4.4.2014 Environmental News Network
Working in conjunction with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities, researchers from the University of Oxford have discovered two pieces of a tusk that when combined measure six feet in length. The researchers believe it is from a Palaeoloxodon or a "straight tusked elephant". An elephant's carpal bone was recovered in a separate study done by a Swiss team in the Nefud Desert just five meters away. The sand layer dates back to approximately 325,000 years and the elephant is believed to be of the same age.
Also found in: [+]
Viking 'Compass' Suggests Medieval Mariners Could Navigate After Sunset 26.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Often regarded as ruthless robbers, the Vikings were also impressive mariners capable of traversing the North Atlantic along a nearly straight line. Now, new interpretations of a medieval compass suggest the sea robbers may have skillfully used the sun to operate the compass even when the sun had set below the horizon. The remains of the supposed compass — known as the Uunartoq disc — were found in Greenland in 1948 in an 11th-century convent. Though some researchers originally argued it was simply a decorative object, other researchers have suggested the disc was an important navigational tool that the Vikings would have used in their roughly 1,600-mile-long (2,500 kilometers) trek from Norway to Greenland. Though only half of the wooden disc remains, it is estimated to have been roughly 2.8 inches (7 centimeters) in diameter with a now-lost central pin that would have cast a shadow from the sun indicative of a cardinal direction. [ Images: Viking Twilight Compass Helps Navigate North ...
Also found in: [+]
Los Angeles Subway Dig Uncovers Treasure Trove Of Prehistoric Fossils 16.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Los Angeles Subway Dig Uncovers Treasure Trove Of Prehistoric Fossils
Also found in: [+]
22 Places In Ireland To Celebrate The Emerald Isle 6.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
22 Places In Ireland To Celebrate The Emerald Isle
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 188