User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Dec 01 2016 21:31 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How the Archaeological Review Behind the Dakota Access Pipeline Went Wrong 1.12.2016 Truthout.com
This summer, Tim Mentz Sr.  took to YouTube  to tell the world about the destruction of his cultural heritage. A former tribal historic preservation officer of the Standing Rock Sioux, Mentz wore a baseball cap, rimless glasses and two thin braids of graying hair. He was upset and spoke rapidly about the area behind him, an expanse of the Great Plains cut by a new 150-foot-wide road. Two days before,  Mentz had testified  to the DC District Court to report the area that lay in the path of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) corridor holds 82 cultural features and 27 graves. By the next day, DAPL construction workers  graded the area . Behind where Mentz stood in the video was a place known as the Strong Heart Society Staff, where a sacred rattle or staff was placed within stone rings. Here members of the elite warrior society would come to make pledges. Mentz explained the site is tangible evidence that Strong Heart members followed a "spiritual path." As an anthropologist who has worked with ...
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Dear Chase Bank. It's Over. 30.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Law enforcement efforts to stop the water protectors at Standing Rock have taken a new turn: in the midst of the most severe weather since the camps were established, North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple has issued an "emergency evacuation order" of the largest camp, and is threatening to stop food and building materials from reaching the encampment. The water protectors have said they will not be moved off the land that is disputed under the Fort Laramie Treaty. Many thousands, from around the country and beyond, are siding with the water protectors, and next week, thousands of veterans plan to arrive to "stand with Standing Rock ." This nonviolent movement isn't budging in its efforts to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, a 1,172-mile proposed pipeline designed to transport a half million barrels of crude oil a day. The water protectors say the pipeline threatens drinking water for the nearby tribes and for millions who live downstream on the Missouri River. The Standing Rock Tribe, hundreds of other ...
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The misguided archaeological review behind the Dakota Access Pipeline 22.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
An archaeology professor explains how official reviews miss key tribal sites.
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How The Archaeological Review Behind The Dakota Access Pipeline Went Wrong 22.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
By Chip Colwell , University of Colorado Denver This summer, Tim Mentz Sr. took to YouTube to tell the world about the destruction of his cultural heritage. A former tribal historic preservation officer of the Standing Rock Sioux, Mentz wore a baseball cap, rimless glasses and two thin braids of graying hair. He was upset and spoke rapidly about the area behind him, an expanse of the Great Plains cut by a new 150-foot-wide road. Two days before, Mentz had testified to the D.C. District Court to report the area that lay in the path of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) corridor holds 82 cultural features and 27 graves. By the next day, DAPL construction workers graded the area . Behind where Mentz stood in the video was a place known as the Strong Heart Society Staff, where a sacred rattle or staff was placed within stone rings. Here members of the elite warrior society would come to make pledges. Mentz explained the site is tangible evidence that Strong Heart members followed a "spiritual ...
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Indigenous Representatives from Across the World Stand with Standing Rock During COP22 Marrakech 17.11.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

On November 17, 2016, Representatives of Indigenous Peoples from all regions of the world representing the International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change, as well as many international allies will raise their voices in solidarity with the Standing Rock Lakota Nation in their defense of Sacred Water, and say NO to the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) at a direct action inside of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP.

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Why Understanding the Native American Perspective Is Essential for Resolving the Dakota Access Pipeline Crisis 12.11.2016 Truthout.com
On Saturday, November 5, 2016, over a thousand participants took to the streets of New York City to march in support of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation. (Photo: Karla Anne Coté / Flickr ) In recent weeks, protests against the building of the Dakota Access Pipeline across North Dakota have escalated. Native American elders, families and children have set up tipis and tents on a campsite near the pipeline's path in the hope of stopping the pipeline's construction. Dave Archambault Jr.,  the leader of the  Standing Rock Sioux Tribe  that is leading the efforts to stop the pipeline, summed up what is at the heart of the issue. In a  brief two-minute statement  before the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland, he said, "Oil companies are causing deliberate destruction of our sacred places." As a Native American scholar of environmental history and religious studies, I am often asked what Native American leaders mean when they say that certain landscapes are "sacred places" or "sacred ...
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Amid 'Crisis and Scandal,' Global Banks Called to Stop Funding Dakota Access 8.11.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe says the Dakota Access pipeline threatens its sovereignty, drinking water, and sacred sites. (Photo: Paulann Egelhoff/flickr/cc)

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The Human Right To Water At Standing Rock 4.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As thousands of Indigenous people from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, other Native American tribes, and their allies continue their protest against the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL), corporate media have continued to focus almost exclusively on the presidential election. Most media ignored last week’s vicious attack on the Water Protectors, as they call themselves. The construction of the pipeline would violate the human right to peace, the right of Indigenous peoples to practice their cultural traditions, and several federal statutes. On October 27, more than 100 police from seven different states and the North Dakota National Guard, clad in riot gear and carrying automatic rifles, arrived in MRAPs [Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected military vehicles], Humvees and an armored police truck. They defended Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), the company behind the pipeline, and arrested 142 Water Protectors. That brings the total arrested since August to over 400. More than 40 people have been injured, and some ...
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The Human Right to Water at Standing Rock 3.11.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Phil Little Thunder Sr. carries water from his home, the Rosebud Reservation, during a protest march at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, September 9, 2016. (Photo: Alyssa Schukar / The New York Times) The Standing Rock Sioux protesting the Dakota Access pipeline are exercising their human right to safe drinking water. The international community, including the World Health Organization, has long recognized that access to safe water is closely linked to Indigenous peoples' control over their ancestral lands. Phil Little Thunder Sr. carries water from his home, the Rosebud Reservation, during a protest march at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, September 9, 2016. (Photo: Alyssa Schukar / The New York Times) As thousands of Indigenous people from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, other Native American tribes, and their allies continue their protest against the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL), corporate media have continued to focus almost exclusively on the presidential ...
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Standing Rock Chair: Obama Could Stop the Dakota Pipeline Today & Preserve Indigenous Sacred Sites 3.11.2016 Democracy Now!
President Obama says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering rerouting the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, amid months of resistance from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and members of more than 200 other Native American nations and tribes from across the Americas. "My view is that there is a way for us to accommodate sacred lands of Native Americans," Obama said. "And I think that right now the Army Corps is examining whether there are ways to reroute this pipeline in a way." Meanwhile, on Wednesday, police deployed pepper spray and tear gas against dozens of Native American water protectors during a standoff at Cantapeta Creek, north of the main resistance camp. At least two people were shot with nonlethal projectiles. Video and photos show police firing the pepper spray and tear gas at the water protectors, who were peacefully standing in the creek. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had ordered police to arrest the Native Americans and destroy a bridge that members of the camp had ...
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Building a Bridge to Turtle Island — Dispatch from Standing Rock 3.11.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Sarah van Gelder

Standing Rock (Nov. 2) — Drone footage taken of the ridge overlooking the camp showed that the water protecters worst fears had been realized. Construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline had reached just a quarter of a mile from the river, plowing through burial grounds and sacred sites of the Sioux people. And the only access to the construction site was via a bridge that has been closed since last Thursday’s confrontation with police. 

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Here's What You Should Know About The Dakota Pipeline Protest 2.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
You might be wondering why it seems like dozens of your Facebook friends are suddenly converging on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota. As of Wednesday, over 1.6 million people had  “checked in” via Facebook at the reservation in an act of solidarity with Standing Rock Sioux tribe members and other supporters who for months have been protesting the construction of an oil pipeline being built by Energy Transfer Partners to transport oil 1,200 miles east, from North Dakota’s Bakken field to a refinery in central Illinois. The protesters, who include representatives of more than 200 other tribes, identify themselves as “water protectors” and contend that the pipeline would disturb sacred lands and burial grounds and would likely harm the Missouri River, which provides the tribe’s drinking water. Early Monday, Facebook users began checking in at Standing Rock and reposting a message claiming that the check-ins were needed to help protect protesters in North Dakota from being monitored ...
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North Dakota Pipeline Protesters Arrested By Police With Pepper Spray 23.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
More than 80 protesters were arrested on Saturday after clashing with police near a pipeline construction site in North Dakota, according to the local sheriff’s department, which said pepper spray was used on some demonstrators. The 83 protesters were arrested near the site of the Dakota Access pipeline on numerous charges ranging from assault on a peace officer to rioting and criminal trespass, the Morton County Sheriff’s department said in a statement. Law enforcement was alerted early Saturday morning to an SUV on private property near the pipeline construction site and found that four men had attached themselves to the vehicle, according to the sheriff’s department. Police removed the men from the SUV before arresting them. Later, around 300 protesters marched toward pipeline construction equipment and tried to breach a police line keeping them from the equipment, the sheriff’s department said. Some were pepper sprayed by law enforcement. One protester attempted to grab a can of pepper spray from an ...
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On Strip Searches and Press Freedom in North Dakota 22.10.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Amy Goodman, Denis Moynihan

Monday was a cold, windy, autumnal day in North Dakota. We arrived outside the Morton County Courthouse in Mandan to produce a live broadcast of the “Democracy Now!” news hour. Originally, the location was dictated by the schedule imposed upon us by the local authorities; one of us (Amy) had been charged with criminal trespass for “Democracy Now!“‘s reporting on the Dakota Access Pipeline company’s violent attack on Native Americans who were attempting to block the destruction of sacred sites, including ancestral burial grounds, just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

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Amy Goodman's arrest puts fierce spotlight on standoff at Standing Rock 21.10.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Thursday, October 20, 2016 Monday was a cold, windy, autumnal day in North Dakota. We arrived outside the Morton County Courthouse in Mandan to produce a live broadcast of the Democracy Now! news hour. Originally, the location was dictated by the schedule imposed upon us by the local authorities; one of us (Amy) had been charged with criminal trespass for Democracy Now!'s reporting on the Dakota Access Pipeline company's violent attack on Native Americans who were attempting to block the destruction of sacred sites, including ancestral burial grounds, just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Attempts to criminalize nonviolent land and water defenders, humiliate them and arrest journalists should not pave the way for the controversial Dakota Access ...
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The bid for Bears Ears 16.10.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The tribal push for a Bears Ears monument raises thorny questions of homeland and sovereignty.
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The bid for Bears Ears 16.10.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The tribal push for a Bears Ears monument raises thorny questions of homeland and sovereignty.
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What if nature had the rights of a person (or a business)? 14.10.2016 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Corporations are treated as people in the eyes of the law. What about the air and trees?
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Indians and Cowboys The 2016 Version of an Old Story on a New Planet 20.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Chip Ward

Cowboys and Indians are at it again.

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Indians And Cowboys: Last Stand At Standing Rock 20.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Cowboys and Indians are at it again.  Americans who don’t live in the West may think that the historic clash of Native Americans and pioneering settlers is long past because the Indians were, after all, defeated and now drive cars, watch television, and shop at Walmart.  Not so.  That classic American narrative is back big time, only the Indians are now the good guys and the cowboys -- well, their right-wing representatives, anyway -- are on the warpath, trying to grab 640 million acres of public lands that they can plunder as if it were yesteryear.  Meanwhile, in the Dakotas, America’s Manifest Destiny, that historic push across the Great Plains to the Pacific (murdering and pillaging along the way), seems to be making a return trip to Sioux country in a form that could have planetary consequences. Energy Transfer Partners is now building the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.7 billion oil slick of a project.  It’s slated to go from the Bakken gas and oil fracking fields in ...
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