User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: May 19 2016 09:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 221    
How to remember a century of National Parks, for people of color 18.5.2016 Writers on the Range
Also found in: [+]
In a Historic Election, Where Do the Candidates Stand on Protecting America's Heritage? 30.3.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
During 2016 the United States is commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the federal historic preservation program, created when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) into law. This year-long celebration has been dubbed Preservation50 . It has united an unprecedented coalition of citizens who care about preservation and community to take stock of the past fifty years of preservation lessons and look towards shaping the next half decade. Americans are also choosing their 45th president, in an unusually historic and dramatic election. So what are the records of the leading candidates on preserving history itself? There is a surprisingly close association between American presidents and historic preservation. Thomas Jefferson is often called the Father of American Archaeology for his excavation of Indian mounds at Monticello in 1782, and his home and the University of Virginia that he founded are now World Heritage Sites. In 1858 George Washington's home at Mount ...
Also found in: [+]
Nuclear Power in Our World Today 11.3.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Editor's Note: The following news piece represents the first in a 15-part mini-series titled, Nuclear Power in Our World Today, featuring nuclear authority, engineer and whistleblower Arnie Gundersen. The EnviroNews USA special encompasses a wide span of topics, ranging from Manhattan-era madness to the continuously-unfolding crisis on the ground at Fukushima Daiichi in eastern Japan. The transcript follows the video below: TRANSCRIPT: Josh Cunnings (Narrator): Welcome to the EnviroNews USA news desk. I'm your host Josh Cunnings. In this first episode of a unique 15-part mini-series of short-films, we are going to explore Nuclear Power in Our World Today. Our journey extends outward from a bombshell interview conducted by EnviroNews Editor-in-Chief Emerson Urry, with the esteemed nuclear expert, whistleblower, and expert witness Arnie Gundersen. Gundersen is a nuclear engineer, as well as a former power plant operator, and trade executive, whose own life, for a good amount of time, was ruined by the ...
Also found in: [+]
How not to forget the West’s past atrocities 7.3.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The national park system does more than celebrate beauty. It also commemorates the ugliest parts of our past.
Also found in: [+]
Native Americans Warn Native Hawaiians of the Dangers of Federal Recognition 13.12.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Also see: US Government Asks Native Hawaiians to Legitimize Occupation With Vote   Many people are unaware of the unique history of the United States' occupation of Hawai'i. (Image: Hawaii map via Shutterstock)In 2001, the late Russell Means of the Oglala Sioux nation visited Hawaiʻi where he shared his grandfather's words regarding the impact federal recognition has had on indigenous peoples. "Grandson, all of this land someday will not be yours. That's the reality of federal recognition. Someday, none of this will be yours. Welcome to America." His prophetic words particularly ring true today. In the summer of 2014, the U.S. Department of the Interior or DOI held a series of 15 public hearings throughout the Hawaiian islands to discuss the reestablishment of a "formal government-to-government relationship between the United States and the Native Hawaiian community." By and large, the U.S. government is persuading the Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) to accept a process by which they will be federally ...
Also found in: [+]
How a plan to save southeastern Colorado went off the rails 23.11.2015 Current Issue
Heritage tourism offered a way out of economic doldrums. Why did it go wrong?
Also found in: [+]
Lakota Women and Ranchers Lead Charge to Break Silence Against Uranium Mine 12.10.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Thousands of active uranium wells at the Crow Butte Resources mine in Crawford, Nebraska. (Photo: WNV / Rosy Torres) With a population of around 1,000 people, the rural town of Crawford, Nebraska was an unlikely setting for a federal hearing, but it became the site of one in late August thanks to the dogged determination of a group of Lakota and environmental activists, as well as geologists, hydrologists and lawyers - all of whom have been fighting the permit renewal of a uranium mine located in town. The region is ripe with stories from the brutal Indian wars, when Lakota and neighboring tribes fought over western expansion. Today, this intersection of frontier America and Native resistance is a battleground in the war between environmental advocates and energy corporations, only this time allies from all sides are joining forces in the effort to protect their water. The Crow Butte Resources, or CBR, uranium mine is comprised of thousands of wells at the base of Crow Butte, a sacred site located within ...
Also found in: [+]
Monument designations aren't land grabs. They're protection against theft. 8.10.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Also found in: [+]
John McCain Fought For Native Religious Freedom, Then Sold Sacred Oak Flat 28.9.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) has been the subject of intense criticism from Native activists and their supporters over the past year for his role in orchestrating the sale of Oak Flat, an Apache holy site located in Arizona’s Tonto National Forest, to foreign mining conglomerates Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton. In December 2014 , McCain and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) added a rider onto the must-pass National Defense Authorization Act, allowing the Oak Flat deal to slide through. Members of the San Carlos Apache Nation know Oak Flat as Chich’il Biłdagoteel, a site where they gather food and medicinal plants and host dances and healing ceremonies. The area was once part of the old San Carlos reservation and functioned as a prisoner-of-war camp for the Apache during their decades-long struggle against the United States and Mexico. Not far from Oak Flat is a place called " Apache Leap " where, in 1870, Apache warriors plunged over a cliff to their deaths rather than surrender to the United States cavalry. Today the ...
Also found in: [+]
Drought Relief Bill Threatens to Drown Sacred Sites of a Northern California Tribe 26.8.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Winnemem Wintu men dance by a sacred fire on a morning of cultural dances from different indigenous communities. (Photo: Rucha Chitnis) Members of the Winnemem Wintu tribe in California are bracing for one of their biggest environmental justice struggles yet: opposing a $1.3 billion drought relief bill that would raise the height of the Shasta Dam, and drown their remaining sacred sites and villages. Winnemem Wintu men dance by a sacred fire on a morning of cultural dances from different indigenous communities. (Photo: Rucha Chitnis) Want to challenge injustice and make real change happen? That's Truthout's goal - support our work with a donation today! The McCloud River gurgles and gushes down the Cascade Range, gathering streams from the towering Mount Shasta, a mountain of mythic and sacred symbolism to many. The river pours down three waterfalls over basaltic lava flows, where Chinook salmon once heroically jumped up the falls to spawn and propagate. This August, members of the Winnemem Wintu tribe ...
Also found in: [+]
Ecological Burial Practices: Overcoming the Myth of the Infectious Corpse 19.8.2015 Truthout.com
In her new book, Greening Death, author Suzanne Kelly explores the myths that drive many of our standard, environmentally damaging burial practices, explaining how embalming and encasing the dead in caskets have little to do with limiting health risks or ensuring adequate sanitation. Author Suzanne Kelly discusses the myths that drive many of our standard, environmentally damaging burial practices. (Photo: Braveyard via Shutterstock; edited: LW / TO) Dead bodies endure as objects of cultural fear, especially in US popular culture, where the specter of their attendant decay is on display in everything from crime scene investigations to zombie sagas. But this threat is not only the stuff of fiction. Over the last 150 years, US funerary practices have spun a similar story in which humans, as well as the whole of nature, must do its best to guard against the dangerous wrath of the corpse. In her new book Greening Death: Reclaiming Burial Practices and Restoring Our Tie to the Earth, author Suzanne Kelly ...
Also found in: [+]
Apaches Rally At Capitol, Vowing To Continue Fighting For Sacred Oak Flat 23.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
   WASHINGTON -- Apache protesters completed their cross-country journey from the San Carlos reservation in Arizona to Washington, D.C., with a Wednesday rally on the lawn of the Capitol building, protesting Congress’ sale of their sacred Oak Flat to foreign mining conglomerates. The area known as Oak Flat is part of Arizona's Tonto National Forest, and the Apache have used it for generations in young women’s coming-of-age ceremonies. In 1955,  President Dwight Eisenhower  removed it from consideration for mining activities in recognition of its natural and cultural value. But in December 2014, during the final days of the previous Congress, Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) added a rider to the must-pass National Defense Authorization Act that opened the land to mining conglomerates  Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton. That change led to this week's protests in Washington. Wendsler Nosie Sr. and his granddaughter, 16-year-old Naelyn Pike, led the Apache Stronghold coalition with speeches, ...
Also found in: [+]
Apache Stronghold Caravan Calls to Protect Sacred Sites 20.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Members of the San Carlos Apache Tribe are fighting to preserve sacred sites in Arizona after lawmakers slipped a clause into the National Defense Authorization Act that would allow copper mining in the area. The land in question includes parts of Tonto National Forest, including Oak Flat and Devil's Canyon, and could also impact nearby Apache Leap, an important historic site where a group of Apache who were being pursued by US cavalry plunged off a cliff to their deaths rather than be captured. Resolution Copper Mining, a subsidiary of British-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto, has long sought ownership of the land. But the battle is not over. Earlier this month, a group called the Apache Stronghold began a caravan from Tucson, Arizona, to Washington, DC, to call for this land to once again be protected. On their way, they stopped in New York today and joined us in our studio. We speak with Wendsler Nosie Sr., Peridot District Council member and former chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe. He's the ...
Also found in: [+]
Efforts to save Utah's Cedar Mesa reach a crescendo 2.7.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Conflicting county and state proposals would provide various levels of protection.
Also found in: [+]
On the Road to Red Rock 20.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
On the road again! School was hardly out before the family and I had our camping gear packed into the rental minivan. Time for another western adventure to visit and learn about some of the public lands that the Sierra Club and others are working to protect. Where to this year? As a parent, I would never single out one child as my favorite. As executive director of the Sierra Club, I would never say that I love one part of Our Wild America more than the others, but...  we started this year's trip by heading back to the red rock lands of southern Utah that we visited two years ago. The dry canyons and mesas can seem forbidding, but their stark beauty is unassailable. Our first big stop was the Four Corners region of southeastern Utah, where we had the privilege of meeting with members of the local Navajo and Ute Mountain Ute tribal communities. Local tribes have deep ties to the lands here. They live, work and practice their traditions on this land. They and the other tribes of the Four Corners area are ...
Also found in: [+]
Sacred Statues Destroyed By The Taliban Return As Ghostly Projections 12.6.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A pair of sacred statues that the Taliban destroyed in Afghanistan have been recreated by enormous 3-D light projections. The Sunni Muslim Taliban forces blew up the Buddha statues in March 2001 as an act of religious terror. Leader Mullah Omar declared that they were false idols and forced local workers to blow them up. The statues were carved into cliffs in Afghanistan's Bamiyan Valley, a World Heritage Site , about 1,500 years ago , and have lay in rubble for more than a decade. Chinese documentarians Janson Yu and Liyan Hu created huge projections of the statues over the weekend, according to The Atlantic . They journeyed to the Bamiyan Valley after UNESCO and the Afghan government gave them permission to debut their work. This photo taken on June 7, 2015, shows the projected image of a Buddha statue in the Bamiyan Valley. The ghostly 3-D light projections filled the one hundred-foot high cutouts in the mountains where the original stone statues once stood. Over 150 people watched the spectacle , The ...
Also found in: [+]
Expelled for Life: A Palestinian Family's Struggle to Stay on Their Land 12.6.2015 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
Expelled for Life: A Palestinian Family's Struggle to Stay on Their Land 11.6.2015 Truthout.com
Nasser Nawaj'ah was only four years old in June 1986 when, after the remains of an ancient synagogue were discovered in Old Susya, Israel's Civil Administration - the military body through which it manages the Occupied Palestinian Territories -  expropriated the village. Nasser (left) and Laith Nawaj'ah. (Photo: Jen Marlowe) Nasser Nawaj'ah held Laith's hand as, beside me, they walked down the dirt and pebble path of Old Susya. Nasser is 33 years old, his son six. Nasser's jaw was set and every few moments he glanced over his shoulder to see if anyone was approaching. Until Laith piped up with his question, the only sounds were our footsteps and the wind, against which Nasser was wearing a wool hat and a pleated brown jacket. "Why did they take our home?" the little boy asked. "Why did they take it? Good question," replied Nasser, pausing to choose his words carefully. "They don't want Palestinians. They don't want us here." Laith was, in fact, asking about something that had happened 29 years ago when ...
Also found in: [+]
Film That May Show Amelia Earhart Moments Before Last Flight Revealed 9.6.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
LOS ANGELES (AP) — It was a clear spring day in 1937 when Amelia Earhart, ready to make history by flying around the world, brought her personal photographer to a small Southern California airport to document the journey's beginning. Al Bresnik took dozens of still photos, including a few that have likely been seen by millions. His brother John, who tagged along, made a very dark, grainy 3.5-minute home movie almost nobody saw — until now. The film, "Amelia Earhart's Last Photo Shoot," is being released this month by The Paragon Agency publishing house, along with an 80-page book of the same name that documents a journey that ended tragically short of the finish line when Earhart's plane vanished somewhere over the Pacific Ocean. A downloadable copy of the film is being provided to those who buy the book. Paragon publisher Doug Westfall said he eventually plans to donate the fragile original given to him by John Bresnik's son to an archive or museum. The film, taken with a millimeter camera, sat on a ...
Also found in: [+]
Is Enbridge's Pipeline Treaty with Minnesota an Offering from a Trickster? 8.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sometimes you find yourself in exactly the right place at the right time, even when it seems events have conspired to thwart desire. For months, I had planned a camping trip to the far western regions of the Great Plains. Spring offered the opportunity for spiritual renewal at the Native American sacred sites of Wyoming's Devils Tower and South Dakota's Wind Cave. I was completely dismayed and frustrated to learn that while I was a day's drive from Minnesota, 5000 people would be gathering in Minneapolis/St. Paul to protest the Tar Sands pipeline expansions through the upper Midwest. Coincidentally, the decision of the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission to grant a certificate of need to the Enbridge Corporation for the controversial Sandpiper Pipeline, which would carry Bakken oil crude, was also on the minds of the rally organizers and participants. All that remains is the decision on routing, but opponents say there is no upside to a pipeline that threatens Native Treaty lands and the health and ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 221