User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Feb 19 2018 21:05 IST RSS 2.0
 
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"The US's Culture of Violence Contributes to the Sanctification of the Second Amendment": An Interview With Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz 19.2.2018 Truthout.com
A gun display showing the Statue of Liberty holding a pistol is seen at a National Rifle Association outdoor sports trade show on February 10, 2017, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The Second Amendment was born of slave patrols and militia massacres of Indigenous people. (Photo: Dominick Reuter / AFP / Getty Images) The Second Amendment had little utility while white supremacy reigned, says Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of Loaded. It was only in the post-World War II era -- with the rise of the Black, Indigenous and Mexican freedom movements -- did white nationalists, including state and local officials, being using it as a legal tool to preserve or restore white dominance. A gun display showing the Statue of Liberty holding a pistol is seen at a National Rifle Association outdoor sports trade show on February 10, 2017, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The Second Amendment was born of slave patrols and militia massacres of Indigenous people. (Photo: Dominick Reuter / AFP / Getty Images) In Loaded: A Disarming ...
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The Trump Administration's Attacks on Public Lands and Waters Will Cause Irreparable Harm 18.1.2018 Truthout.com
The designation of a national monument protects the land from drilling, fracking, mining, logging -- protection not afforded to the majority of public land, says Randi Spivak of the Center for Biological Diversity. Spivak discusses why the largest delisting of protected federal lands in US history will harm species, waters and exacerbate climate change. Who are the powerful funders behind Truthout? Our readers! Help us publish more stories like this one by making a tax-deductible donation. In December, Trump  announced  that he would shrink Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments in Utah by 85 percent and 46 percent respectively. The announcement came after Trump had ordered Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke in April to review 27 national monuments created since 1996 that were 100,000 acres or larger, and Zinke subsequently recommended that these and other monuments be reduced. Trump's move represents the  largest  delisting of protected federal lands in US history, removing 2 ...
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Lawsuits challenge Trump’s trim of Utah monuments 20.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Reductions in Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante exclude thousands of significant objects.
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A Civil Conversation: The lessons of Nicodemus, Kansas 15.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
One of the few black settlements of the West remains — barely.
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Indian Country News: A monumental blow to tribes 9.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Trump’s decision to shrink Bears Ears reopens wounds that Obama sought to heal.
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How to make sense of Trump’s changes to Bears Ears 5.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The drastically reduced boundaries don’t line up with what the public wants.
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Ancient Barley Took High Road to China, Changed to Summer Crop in Tibet 21.11.2017 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
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Forest department says digging of land would destroy ecosystem 14.11.2017 Chandigarh – The Indian Express
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How an ancient potato helped people survive climate shifts 30.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Utah-area tribes explain the continuing relevance of North America’s oldest spud.
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Indigenous knowledge untangles the mystery of Mesa Verde 2.10.2017 Current Issue
Pueblo people are helping archaeologists understand the science of human migrations.
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National monuments protect meaning, not just landscapes 2.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
If Bears Ears shrinks, it will be to our national cultural detriment.
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Excavation at Masol: 4 lakh owners for 400 acres of land, Mohali DC asks for revenue records 21.6.2017 Chandigarh – The Indian Express
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19 Epic, Endangered Places You Should Visit Before It's Too Late 14.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The world is full of beautiful places , but not all of them will stay that way . This week,  UNESCO released its annual state of conservation reports , which outline which of its famous designated  World Heritage Sites  are in danger of losing the historic, cultural or natural characteristics that made them World Heritage Sites in the first place. Places on the “ Danger List ” face threats like  soil erosion, lack of water and poor land management , to name a few. The World Heritage Committee prepares conservation reports for these places so it can discuss ways to better protect and conserve them if needed. Tourism can harm the world’s wonders , but it can also help them when done responsibly. Below, find 19 places from UNESCO’s conservation reports  that warrant a responsible visit. To compile this list, we pulled spots that appear on the Danger List , omitting any that come with travel warnings form the U.S. State Department . While such places are no less important, it’s not recommended that you visit ...
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Archaeologists are the last line of defense against destruction 8.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
You never know what you’ll find with a ‘detective of the land.’
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Of Science And Religion - Can Spiritual Values Of Forests Inspire Conservation? 25.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In his recent book EO Wilson advocates conserving half of the planet for one species (Homo sapiens) and the other half for the remaining millions of species. His list of “best places on the biosphere” worthy of saving include several sacred sites: the church forests of Ethiopia, the Western Ghats in India, natural areas of Bhutan, remnant forests in the Congo and Ghana, the redwoods of California, and the tepuis of Venezuela. All of these forests have spiritual value for the native people in the region, which has contributed to the safe-guarding of these landscapes more effectively than walls or monetary metrics. Sacred forests are a critical component of biodiversity conservation, yet remain difficult to account for in most western calculations of global biodiversity management. Such sacred regions have been fiercely protected by cultural and religious beliefs and taboos for many centuries. Further, many sacred sites are successfully maintained through traditional means of community-based conservation ...
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Trump Order Could Open Up Area Larger Than Yellowstone to Drilling 13.5.2017 Truthout.com
In addition to Bears Ears and Grand Staircase, monuments now threatened under Trump's newest decision to review national monument protections include Upper Missouri River Breaks in Montana and Carrizo Plain -- which is the last remnant of a vast grassland that once stretched across California. (Photo: Bureau of Land Management / Flickr ) More than 2.7 million acres of iconic US landscape could be at risk from fossil fuel exploration following Donald Trump's decision to review protections on national monuments, an Energydesk investigation can now reveal. Trump issued an executive order last month requiring the Department of Interior to review 27 monuments designated since 1996 -- suggesting they could pose a barrier to energy independence. Energydesk can now reveal that an area of protected land larger than Yellowstone national park could be at risk from drilling as a result -- with six national monuments affected by the executive order sitting above known or potential reserves of oil, gas and coal. The  ...
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Trump's Plan to Dismantle National Monuments Comes With Steep Cultural and Ecological Costs 8.5.2017 Truthout.com
In the few days since President Trump issued his Executive Order on National Monuments , many legal scholars have questioned the legality of his actions under the Antiquities Act. Indeed, if the president attempts to revoke or downsize a monument designation, such actions would be on shaky, if any, legal ground . But beyond President Trump's dubious reading of the Antiquities Act, his threats also implicate a suite of other cultural and ecological laws implemented within our national monuments. By opening a Department of Interior review of all large-scale monuments designated since 1996, Trump places at risk two decades' worth of financial and human investment in areas such as endangered species protection, ecosystem health, recognition of tribal interests and historical protection. Why Size Matters Trump's order suggests that larger-scale monuments such as Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, or the Missouri River Breaks National Monument in Montana, run afoul of the Antiquities Act because of their ...
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Trump's Plan To Dismantle National Monuments Comes With Steep Cultural And Ecological Costs 4.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Michelle Bryan & Monte Mills , The University of Montana , and Sandra B. Zellmer , University of Nebraska-Lincoln In the few days since President Trump issued his Executive Order on National Monuments , many legal scholars have questioned the legality of his actions under the Antiquities Act. Indeed, if the president attempts to revoke or downsize a monument designation, such actions would be on shaky, if any, legal ground . But beyond President Trump’s dubious reading of the Antiquities Act, his threats also implicate a suite of other cultural and ecological laws implemented within our national monuments. By opening a Department of Interior review of all large-scale monuments designated since 1996, Trump places at risk two decades’ worth of financial and human investment in areas such as endangered species protection, ecosystem health, recognition of tribal interests and historical protection. Why size matters Trump’s order suggests that larger-scale monuments such as Bears Ears National Monument in ...
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Latest: Zinke reopens Recapture Canyon to motor vehicles 1.5.2017 Current Issue
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How environmentalists could do more for Bears Ears 4.4.2017 High Country News Most Recent
On issues of industrial recreation, green groups say too little.
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