User: flenvcenter Topic: Land-Independent
Category: Land Management :: Cultural Resources
Last updated: Sep 07 2014 05:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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It's a peach of a story 7.9.2014 Earth Times
How did the peach become selected from the typical forest tree. Was it developed like many fruits as a recent addition to food habits, or did it become domesticated early, like the goat, the dog and the pig, to provide a rich varied diet for early agriculturalists?
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Languages Are Going Extinct Even Faster Than Species Are 3.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The world's roughly 7000 known languages are disappearing faster than species, with a different tongue dying approximately every 2 weeks. Now, by borrowing methods used in ecology to track endangered species, researchers have identified the primary threat to linguistic diversity: economic development. Though such growth has been shown to wipe out language in the past on a case-by-case basis, this is the first study to demonstrate that it is a global phenomenon, researchers say. Many people know about the threatened polar bear and extinct passenger pigeon, but few have heard of endangered and extinct languages such as Eyak in Alaska, whose last speaker died in 2008, or Ubykh in Turkey, whose last fluent speaker died in 1992, says Tatsuya Amano, a zoologist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom and lead author of the new study. It’s well known that economic growth or the desire to achieve it can drive language loss, he notes—dominant languages such as Mandarin Chinese and English are often ...
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'Pristine' Mammoth Skeleton Unearthed In Texas 28.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Marty McEwen was digging in the dirt on his dad's North Texas property in May when the excavator suddenly hit something. That something turned out to be a six-foot tusk -- of a mammoth that had walked the earth tens of thousands of years ago . Then, as if finding a mammoth tusk on one's property wasn't spectacular enough, McEwen and his dad, Wayne, soon discovered that it wasn't just the tusk that was buried on their family's land but the animal's nearly complete skeleton -- in pristine condition, no less. The skeleton is believed to belong to a female Colombian mammoth that stood approximately 8 to 9 feet tall at the shoulder. It's estimated to be 20,000 to 60,000 years old . Experts called the skeleton -- which is reportedly 90 percent complete -- an "outstanding find." "We get a lot of mammoth fossils in Texas but it's usually a tooth here, a tusk there or a piece of jaw," Ron Tykoski, a paleontologist with the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, told Reuters. "This is unusual. It looks like ...
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Leave a lighter footprint: green funeral and burial tips 7.7.2014 TreeHugger
If you lead a green life, you can also make arrangements for a green death. Here are 10 tips for green funerals.
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Archaeological expedition reveals first fossil-record evidence of forest fire ecology 6.6.2014 Environmental News Network
Fossils can reveal an incredible amount of information. From what kind of organisms lived when and where to how they may have evolved over time. And now a new discovery of plant fossils with abundant fossilized charcoal reveals something new about prehistoric forest fires. Forest fires affect ecosystems differently and despite the fact that organisms and plant life have had to adapt to cope with these natural phenomena, new research shows that forests have been recovering from fires in the same manner as they did 66 million years ago.
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This Is The Most Spiritual Place In Your Home State 29.5.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Spiritual enlightenment is a great reason for a road trip this summer (as if any reason were needed). In order to help you on your path we have compiled a completely subjective list of the holiest places in America - one in each 50 states. Which are your favorites? Let us know in the comments. And if you visit any of these sacred sites tweet us your photos at @HuffPostRelig ! Alabama Congregation Sha'arai Shomayim / Springhill Avenue Temple, Mobile This Sephardic Jewish congregation is the oldest in the state of Alabama, and one of the oldest in the whole of the United States. It was organized in Mobile on January 25, 1844, and secured land for the cemetery in 1876. A new location on Springhill Avenue was dedicated in 1955, where the congregation resides to this day. Alaska Mount Denali Also known as Mount McKinley, this peak is the highest peak in North America and holds great significance within the native traditions. "Denali" is translated as "the great one" in the Athabaskan languages of the Alaska ...
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Spanish Conquest Altered Peru's Shoreline, New Research Shows 22.5.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In 1532, Francisco Pizarro led an expedition of battle-hardened Spanish soldiers on a fateful journey, from the desert coast of northern Peru to the highland Inca city of Cajamarca. A civil war had just ended in the Inca Empire, and Pizarro and a party of fewer than 200 men marched eastward to capitalize on the turmoil. The ensuing Spanish conquest of the Inca had a profound effect on the region’s indigenous people, but a new paper published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that it also had an unexpected impact on the land itself . Before the Spaniards arrived, inhabitants of the arid northern Peruvian coast clad massive sand dune–like ridges with an accidental form of “armor”: millions of discarded mollusk shells, which protected the ridges from erosion for nearly 4700 years and produced a vast corrugated landscape that “is visible from space,” says archaeologist Dan Sandweiss of the University of Maine, Orono, one of the paper’s authors. Archaeologist Dan Sandweiss ...
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A reluctant rebellion in the Utah desert 14.5.2014 High Country News Most Recent
For ATVers at Recapture Canyon, realpolitik meets out-of-town zeal.
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Time to Smack Down Trespassing Vigilantes and Thugs 13.5.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
"This land is your land, this land is my land," Woody Guthrie, 1952. "This is OUR land," Jarbidge Shovel Brigade Official Web Site, 2002. On Sept. 1, 1846, my great-grandfather's great-grandfather camped with his family in a place that is now the outskirts of Elko, Nevada. It was a silent night. There were no roads for hundreds of miles. It would be over a half century before the first automobile would be built. It would be a full century before Cliven Bundy's father would begin grazing cattle on the federal land that pioneers like my ancestors conquered. Things have changed since the 1840s. Today, only the most inaccessible fragments of our shared land are unmarred by intrusions. The few remaining wild, roadless areas are special, spectacular places, with untracked deserts, grassy prairies, and healthy forests. Wildlife and archaeological sites are protected by isolation, and people can visit for solitude and rejuvenation. This land is your land. Without protection, roads and development will eventually ...
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Drones Reveal Hidden Ancient Village Buried In New Mexico 11.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Thermal images captured by a small drone allowed archaeologists to peer under the surface of the New Mexican desert floor, revealing never-before-seen structures in an ancient Native American settlement. Called Blue J, this 1,000-year-old village was first identified by archaeologists in the 1970s. It sits about 43 miles (70 kilometers) south of the famed Chaco Canyon site in northwestern New Mexico and contains nearly 60 ancestral Puebloan houses around what was once a large spring. Now, the ruins of Blue J are obscured by vegetation and buried in eroded sandstone blown in from nearby cliffs. The ancient structures have been only partially studied through excavations. Last June, a team of archaeologists flew a small camera-equipped drone over the site to find out what infrared images might reveal under the surface. [ Chaco Canyon Photos: The Center of an Ancient World ] "I was really pleased with the results," said Jesse Casana, an archaeologist from the University of Arkansas. "This work illustrates ...
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Unearthing of large tusk in Arabian Desert suggests once greener pastures 4.4.2014 Environmental News Network
Working in conjunction with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities, researchers from the University of Oxford have discovered two pieces of a tusk that when combined measure six feet in length. The researchers believe it is from a Palaeoloxodon or a "straight tusked elephant". An elephant's carpal bone was recovered in a separate study done by a Swiss team in the Nefud Desert just five meters away. The sand layer dates back to approximately 325,000 years and the elephant is believed to be of the same age.
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Viking 'Compass' Suggests Medieval Mariners Could Navigate After Sunset 26.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Often regarded as ruthless robbers, the Vikings were also impressive mariners capable of traversing the North Atlantic along a nearly straight line. Now, new interpretations of a medieval compass suggest the sea robbers may have skillfully used the sun to operate the compass even when the sun had set below the horizon. The remains of the supposed compass — known as the Uunartoq disc — were found in Greenland in 1948 in an 11th-century convent. Though some researchers originally argued it was simply a decorative object, other researchers have suggested the disc was an important navigational tool that the Vikings would have used in their roughly 1,600-mile-long (2,500 kilometers) trek from Norway to Greenland. Though only half of the wooden disc remains, it is estimated to have been roughly 2.8 inches (7 centimeters) in diameter with a now-lost central pin that would have cast a shadow from the sun indicative of a cardinal direction. [ Images: Viking Twilight Compass Helps Navigate North ...
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Los Angeles Subway Dig Uncovers Treasure Trove Of Prehistoric Fossils 16.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Los Angeles Subway Dig Uncovers Treasure Trove Of Prehistoric Fossils
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22 Places In Ireland To Celebrate The Emerald Isle 6.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
22 Places In Ireland To Celebrate The Emerald Isle
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Long-Term Drought Doomed Indus Valley Civilization, Researchers Say 4.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The decline of Bronze-Age civilizations in Egypt, Greece and Mesopotamia has been attributed to a long-term drought that began around 2000 bc . Now palaeoclimatologists propose that a similar fate was followed by the enigmatic Indus Valley Civilization, at about the same time. Based on isotope data from the sediment of an ancient lake, the researchers suggest that the monsoon cycle, which is vital to the livelihood of all of South Asia, essentially stopped there for as long as two centuries. The Indus Valley, in present Pakistan and northwest India, was home to a civilization also known as the Harappan Civilization. It was characterized by large, well-planned cities with advanced municipal sanitation systems and a script that has never been deciphered. But the Harappans seemed to slowly lose their urban cohesion, and their cities were gradually abandoned. The link between this gradual decline and climate has been tenuous because of a dearth of climate records from the region. So Yama ...
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Pompeii Wall Collapses After Days Of Heavy Rain At Ancient Site 3.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Pompeii Wall Collapses After Days Of Heavy Rain At Ancient Site
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Recapture Canyon and an illegal ATV trail 13.2.2014 Writers on the Range
A Utah county attempts to gain right of way on public land.
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Glass Bottle Found After Being Dumped By Oceanographer In 1956 8.2.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Glass Bottle Found After Being Dumped By Oceanographer In 1956
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World's Oldest Roman Temple Believed Uncovered In Italy (PHOTOS) 2.2.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The site thus offers both an important glimpse at the earliest phases of occupation at Rome in the latter half of the second millennium and an unparalleled opportunity to study the development of a major cult area in relation to the processes of urbanization and state formation from the eighth to the sixth centuries. ...
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100-Year-Old Photos From Lost Antarctic Expedition Unveiled 31.12.2013 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the restored images taken from the deck of the Aurora, looking south to Hut Point Peninsula. One of the restored images of Big Razorback Island, McMurdo Sound, most likely taken from the deck of the Aurora in January 1915. Alexander Stevens, chief scientist on board the Aurora, who was later stranded at Cape Evans. ...
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