User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-National
Category: Indigenous Rights
Last updated: Feb 20 2017 02:13 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump thumbs his nose at tribal sovereignty 20.2.2017 Seattle Times: Opinion

When an Indian community’s way of life is threatened by a massive oil pipeline, the federal government cannot easily put corporate interests above tribal concerns.
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Op-ed: Tribes worked patiently for Bears Ears Monument, and it should endure 12.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The past few weeks have been troubling for our tribes (Hopi, Navajo, Ute, Mountain Ute and Zuni), which are formally joined in a union of governments as the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition. President Trump’s issuance of a presidential memorandum to proceed with the Dakota Access pipeline over the objections of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe disregards treaty rights and threatens tribal sovereignty, and we pray that it is not a sign of things to come for Utah. Utah’s GOP congressional delegatio...
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Veterans stand against Dakota pipeline 10.2.2017 CNN: Top Stories
The troops are mobilizing for a second "deployment."
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Dakota Access Pipeline to get final permit 8.2.2017 CNN: Top Stories
The US Army Corps of Engineers will grant an easement in North Dakota for the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, allowing the project to move toward completion despite the protests of Native Americans and environmentalists.
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"Standing Rock Is Everywhere Right Now": A Conversation With Judith LeBlanc 7.2.2017 Truthout.com
Indigenous people from across the country are massing in Washington this March to demand that Trump deal with Indigenous communities as sovereign nations, says Judith LeBlanc, director of the Native Organizers Alliance. Meanwhile, activists inspired by Seattle will continue to put pressure on banks financing the Dakota Access pipeline. A Water Protector camps out at the Oceti Sakowin Camp along the Cannonball River at Standing Rock in September 2016. (Photo: Sarah Jaffe) It can be easy to despair, to feel like trends toward inequality are impossible to stop, to give in to fear over increased racist, sexist and xenophobic violence. But around the country, people are doing the hard work of fighting back and coming together to plan for what comes next. In this ongoing "Interviews for Resistance" series, we introduce you to some of them. Today's interview is the tenth in the series.  Click here for the most recent interview before this one . "Standing Rock is everywhere right now," says Judith LeBlanc of the ...
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Thousands turn out in downtown L.A. to protest Trump's orders on Keystone, Dakota pipelines 6.2.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Thousands converged on downtown Los Angeles on Sunday to protest the proposed $3.8-billion Dakota Access pipeline, which activists across the country say threatens the water supply and sacred sites of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota.

Organizers, gathering at Pershing Square, say this...

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Unmasking the extreme right threatening U.S. liberal democracy 3.2.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Friday, February 3, 2017 In the interest of knowing your enemy, here are some thoughts on what former Breitbart CEO Steve Bannon, a.k.a. Trump's Brain, represents. Whether these two in fusion -- a political Vulcan mind meld -- can uproot two centuries-plus of American liberal democracy, is what's at stake in the coming years (or weeks). For instance, are Bannon and the alt-right, for which, he acknowledges, Breitbart has been "the platform," racist? In the interest of knowing your enemy, here are some thoughts on what former Breitbart CEO Steve Bannon, a.k.a. Trump's Brain, ...
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Missile Launchers at Standing Rock: Weaponized Law in Action 27.1.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Civil rights attorney Jeffrey Haas at Standing Rock in fall 2016. (Photo: Eric Deweese) Jeff Haas, an attorney with the Water Protector Legal Collective, speaks with Truthout about the draconian legal practices being employed against those at Standing Rock working to protect their water. "Law Enforcement was much less concerned with the constitutional rights of the citizens and more concerned with DAPL getting their pipeline constructed," he said. Civil rights attorney Jeffrey Haas at Standing Rock in fall 2016. (Photo: Eric Deweese) On Tuesday, January 24, President Donald Trump signed an order to move full steam ahead with the Dakota Access fracked oil pipeline (DAPL) at Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The move was a blow to the thousands of people who successfully resisted the pipeline through an Indigenous-led movement in which many people put their bodies on the line, spending months at camps outside Standing Rock. Trump's order will certainly lead to further resistance in the weeks and months to ...
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Canada 150 and the violation of an Algonquin Anishinaabe sacred site 25.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
trr_rpn_jan23-27_2017_chaudiere_history_sacred.mp3 On this week's episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with Lynn Gehl and Lindsay Lambert. Gehl is an Algonquin woman who traces her roots to the Ottawa River Valley, though she herself lives in Peterborough, Ontario. She holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies, and is a writer and activist. Lindsay Lambert is a white settler man, a historian, and also a writer. Both have been involved in the fight against the ongoing colonial development of the Chaudiere Falls and the three associated islands -- a sacred site to the Algonquin Anishinaabe people that is, in the year of Canada 150, slated to be turned into ...
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Canada 150 and the violation of an Algonquin Anishinabe sacred site 25.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
trr_rpn_jan23-27_2017_chaudiere_history_sacred.mp3 On this week's episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with Lynn Gehl and Lindsay Lambert. Gehl is an Algonquin woman who traces her roots to the Ottawa River Valley, though she herself lives in Peterborough, Ontario. She holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies, and is a writer and activist. Lindsay Lambert is a white settler man, a historian, and also a writer. Both have been involved in the fight against the ongoing colonial development of the Chaudiere Falls and the three associated islands -- a sacred site to the Algonquin Anishinabe people that is, in the year of Canada 150, slated to be turned into ...
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Hundreds rally to protest Trump decisions on pipelines 25.1.2017 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- Several hundred people rallied downtown to protest President Donald Trump's decision to advance the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, The Seattle Times reported....
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Pipelines OK'd: How we got here 25.1.2017 CNN: Top Stories
With one swipe of the presidential pen, the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines were back on the agenda, marking the realization of protesters' worst fears about what a Donald Trump presidency means for the environment and the controversial energy projects.
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Hundreds rally in Seattle against Trump’s move to advance Keystone XL, Dakota pipelines 25.1.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

Local activists called the president’s executive orders to boost the projects Tuesday a “devastating reversal” in their efforts to protect the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s rights, water supply and sacred sites.
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Business Highlights 21.1.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

___ China’s growth in 2016 slumps as Trump trade struggle looms BEIJING (AP) — China’s economic growth sank to a three-decade low in 2016 as its struggling exporters brace for a possible trade battle with President-elect Donald Trump. Growth in the quarter ending in December ticked up to 6.8 percent over 2015, supported by government […]
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Court: Indian lending companies subject to federal probe 21.1.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court says lending companies operated by Native American tribes are subject to investigation by a government regulator. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Friday rejected a claim by three tribes that their lending companies were protected by tribal sovereignty from investigation by the […]
Trump Is in; Now Where Does Standing Rock Stand? 20.1.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The temporary hold on the Dakota Access pipeline will likely be overturned by the incoming administration, but the Water Protectors are standing firm. Trump's in-your-face support of the fossil fuel industry has provided an opportunity to organize people who have never worked together before and opposition is stronger than ever. Due to the violent repression of the water protectors by the police, 3,000 veterans came to Standing Rock to act as human shields for the Water Protectors. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds) A Water Protector lifts up his voice to the world during Morning Prayer. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds) This story was published thanks to readers like you -- and it's never been more important to support independent journalism. Click here to donate to Truthout! Inauguration Day is here. The wait is over. The administration that is threatening to devastate the future of our world has taken power. Trump, a proud climate denier and adamant supporter of the fossil fuel industry , ...
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The End of a People: Amazon Dam Destroys Sacred Munduruku "Heaven" 19.1.2017 Truthout.com
Also see:  "One Day, We Will Win": The Fight to Protect Indigenous Lands From Brazil's Hydrodam Plans (Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil) The Tapajós River Basin lies at the heart of the Amazon, and at the heart of an exploding controversy: whether to build 40+ large dams, a railway, and highways, turning the Basin into a vast industrialized commodities export corridor; or to curb this development impulse and conserve one of the most biologically and culturally rich regions on the planet.  Those struggling to shape the Basin's fate hold conflicting opinions, but because the Tapajós is an isolated region, few of these views get aired in the media. Journalist Sue Branford and social scientist Mauricio Torres travelled there recently for Mongabay, and over coming weeks hope to shed some light on the heated debate that will shape the future of the Amazon.  "It is a time of death. The Munduruku ...
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WATCH: Art Manuel on the struggle for Indigenous rights and sovereignty 17.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Is this show currently playing? January 17, 2017 Art Manuel speaks with Democracy Now! journalist Amy Goodman about the struggle for Indigenous rights and sovereignty in the context of the G20 summit in 2010. YouTube Arthur Manuel  (1951 – January 11, 2017) was a First Nations political leader in Canada. He was four times elected chief (1995–2003) and three times elected chair of the Shuswap Nation Tribal Council (1997–2003). During this period, he served as spokesperson of the Interior Alliance of B.C. Indigenous nations and he was at the forefront of the Indigenous logging initiative. He also co-chaired the Assembly of First Nations Delgamuukw Implementation Strategic Committee (DISC) that was mandated to develop a national strategy to compel the federal government to respect the historic Supreme Court decision on Aboriginal title and ...
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The Rights of Nature: Indigenous Philosophies Reframing Law 15.1.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Indigenous battles to defend nature have taken to the streets, leading to powerful mobilizations like the gathering at Standing Rock. They have also taken to the courts, through the development of innovative legal ways of protecting nature. In Ecuador, Bolivia and New Zealand, indigenous activism has helped spur the creation of a novel legal phenomenon -- the idea that nature itself can have rights. Cofan Indigenous leader Emergildo Criollo looks over an oil contaminated river near his home in northern Ecuador. (Photo: Caroline Bennett / Rainforest Action Network (flickr) ) Indigenous battles to defend nature have taken to the streets, leading to powerful mobilizations like the gathering at Standing Rock. They have also taken to the courts, through the development of innovative legal ways of protecting nature. In Ecuador, Bolivia and New Zealand, indigenous activism has helped spur the creation of a novel legal  phenomenon -- the idea that nature itself can have rights. The 2008  constitution of Ecuador ...
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Letter: Read the Bears Ears Proclamation 14.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Gov. Gary Herbert, State Auditor John Dougall, Attorney General Sean Reyes and Utah’s congressional delegation should read the Bears Ears National Monument proclamation before they make public and printed statements. If they read it they would know all present uses will be maintained, including grazing, mining, hunting, hiking, Native Americans gathering firewood, sacred and medicinal plants and access to sacred sites. Five tribes came together to make this national monument happen. The major...
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