User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-National
Category: Indigenous Rights
Last updated: Sep 16 2014 01:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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High stakes for tribal casinos in court fight over labor rights 15.9.2014 Yahoo: US National
By Amanda Becker MOUNT PLEASANT Mich. (Reuters) - After the Saginaw Chippewa fired a housekeeper at the Soaring Eagle casino in 2010, the Michigan tribe found itself at the center of a national legal battle over the reach of U.S. labor law and the sovereign rights of Native American tribes. The housekeeper, Susan Lewis, was fired for soliciting union support among workers at the casino in central Michigan. She challenged her dismissal before the U.S. National Labor Relations Board, which ordered the casino to reinstate Lewis. ...
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Whale huddle braces for clash over Japanese hunting 15.9.2014 World
Nations square off in Slovenia this week over the fate of hundreds of whales in the crosshairs of Japanese and Greenland hunters accused of sidestepping a commercial killing ban. The stage is set for fiery debate among International Whaling Commission (IWC) members, touching on issues of national sovereignty, aboriginal rights and the conservation of Earth's bounty. Trigger issues are Tokyo's plans to relaunch its Antarctic whale hunt despite a ruling of the UN's highest court, and a bid for Greenland's subsistence whaling quota to be enlarged. "We are dealing with some contentious issues and the positions of the countries at the meeting remain far apart," Ryan Wulff, deputy United States commissioner to the IWC, told ...
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A Gathering of the Tribes, Unity in the Black Hills 11.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
From the Cowboy Indian Alliance (CIA) to Neil Young touring with a message to Honor the Treaties  we have witnessed an unprecedented wave of indigenous activism. With good reason, First Nations Peoples are building alliances with environmentalists, celebrities, and artists in solidarity with people everywhere to protect sacred land from exploitation by industry. Inspired by the Idle No More Movement and traditional teachings,  The International Treaty to Protect the Sacred  signed January 25, 2013 between the Pawnee Nation, the Ponca Nation, the Ihanktonwan Dakota and the Oglala Lakota planted the seeds for the flowering of tribal solidarity. Unify  supported the call from Chief Arvol Lookinghorse on World Peace and Prayer Day to honor sacred sites (#reclaimthesacred) and thousands of people in countries around the world joined in synchronized prayer and ceremony for the June 21 Solstice Celebration. Why you might ask? Because native issues are all of our issues. Their ancient love, reverence, and ...
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US Slammed For Failure to Fulfill Legal Obligation to Eliminate All Forms of Race Discrimination 5.9.2014 Truthout.com

The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, responsible for monitoring members' compliance with the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, has published a scathing denunciation of US failures to honor its treaty commitments.

 

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New York Daily News Will No Longer Use 'Redskins' Name 4.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW YORK (AP) — One of the nation's largest newspapers says it will no longer use the name Redskins when writing about Washington's NFL team.

The Daily News of New York said Thursday in a lead editorial titled "Sack the Name" that the reference will no longer be part of stories and columns. The name, however, may appear in quotations, reader letters and discussion of the dispute. Also, the logo of a feathered Native American will be dropped, replaced by an image that features team colors. The editorial notes that language changes through the years, and "the time has come to leave the word behind."

Other media outlets have also dropped the name. Last month, CBS analyst Phil Simms, who will handle Washington's Week 4 game, said he likely won't use the nickname.
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Saving Native American Languages 29.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Language and Native Americans are in the news as media outlets around the nation announce that they will no longer use the "R" word in conjunction with Washington's NFL franchise. They join a groundswell of public opinion against the current mascot, ranging from #NotYourMascot activism on Twitter to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office canceling the team's trademarks for being "disparaging to Native Americans." But this isn't the only fight out there with Native American languages at the forefront. Two bipartisan bills are under consideration in Congress: the Native Language Immersion Student Achievement Act (H.R.4214/S.1948) and the Native American Languages Reauthorization Act of 2014 (H.R.726/S.2299). If passed, the bills will profoundly impact on the revitalization of Native American languages and the education of Native American youth. Urgent action is needed. These two bills provide key financial and legislative support for Native American language revitalization. Not a single Native American ...
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Tribe's casino plan roils quaint Martha's Vineyard 25.8.2014 AP National
AQUINNAH, Mass. (AP) -- On the western tip of Martha's Vineyard, bright clay cliffs and a red brick lighthouse draw visitors as they pile out of cars and tour buses and head up to this town's scenic overlook....
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Tribal casino proposal roils Martha's Vineyard, vacation destination for the well-heeled 25.8.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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Tribe's casino plan roils quaint Martha's Vineyard 25.8.2014 Yahoo: US National
AQUINNAH, Mass. (AP) — On the western tip of Martha's Vineyard, bright clay cliffs and a red brick lighthouse draw visitors as they pile out of cars and tour buses and head up to this town's scenic overlook.
Redskins say team name isn't offensive because it's a proper noun 15.8.2014 LA Times: Opinion
The Washington Redskins have been clinging desperately to a team name that has come under increased fire of late as being offensive to Native Americans.
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On Indigenous Peoples Day, Let's Move on to a New View of Native Americans 10.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When most Americans think of Native peoples, if they think of us at all, they think of Thanksgiving and its benign legend of Pilgrims and Native Americas sitting down together to a shared meal long, long ago. Unfortunately, the collective American gestalt places its indigenous peoples in the past, part of a bygone regrettable era. We were the unlucky sacrifice to the pre-ordained rights inherent in the mentality of Manifest Destiny that permitted European takeover of our lands. Sad, yes, but time to move on. It is, indeed, time to move on. Time to move on to a new view of Native Americans and all indigenous peoples. The International Day of the World's Indigenous People, August 9, presents an opportunity to see and celebrate contemporary indigenous peoples, especially here in America. According to the United Nation's website : "Indigenous peoples represent remarkable diversity -- more than 5,000 distinct groups in some 90 countries. They make up more than 5 per cent of the world's population, some 370 ...
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Native energy: From fossil fuels below to renewables above 4.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Native American Nations face hard choices between fossil fuel vs. renewable energy industry. Health, income and ways of life hang in the balance.

Native energy: From fossil fuels below to renewables above
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Proposed Gondola For Grand Canyon's Rim Has Community On Edge 4.8.2014 NPR News
Developers and the Navajo Nation are negotiating to bring a tourist complex — and jobs — to the edge of the Grand Canyon. But some Native Americans say the project would tread on sacred land.
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Affectionate graffiti mars sacred Indian site in Jefferson County 4.8.2014 Seattle Times: Local
Tamanowas Rock, a 43-million-year-old basalt monolith in Jefferson County, is marred by graffiti about 8 feet long, from end to end, in letters roughly 3 feet high.
Graffiti expressing affection for 'Miranda' mars sacred site for Indian tribe in Washington 4.8.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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Affectionate graffiti mars sacred Indian site 4.8.2014 Yahoo: US National
CHIMACUM, Wash. (AP) — Graffiti expressing affection for someone named Miranda has marred one of the most sacred sites for an American Indian tribe in Washington state.
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Affectionate graffiti mars sacred Indian site 4.8.2014 AP Washington
CHIMACUM, Wash. (AP) -- Graffiti expressing affection for someone named Miranda has marred one of the most sacred sites for an American Indian tribe in Washington state....
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Native tribes cataloged in photos 31.7.2014 CNN: Top Stories
In 2012, photographer Matika Wilbur sold everything in her Seattle apartment and hit the road on a cross-country journey.
American Indian Tribe Fights For Removal Of 'Halfbreed' From Montana Place Names 31.7.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Leaders of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians say the time has come to remove the words "halfbreed" and "breed" from the names of creeks, lakes and other places around the state.

Nicholas Vrooman, who works with the tribe, presented a bill draft to that effect during a recent meeting with the State-Tribal Relations Committee. He says the words are racist terms that demean American Indians. The bill would require state and other agencies to identify places with the terms and remove them from maps and signs when age or vandalism calls for an update. It would also create an advisory group to determine replacement names.

Vrooman says 17 places in Montana have the word "halfbreed" or "breed" in the name, including the Halfbreed Lake National Wildlife Refuge.

The bill comes as the Washington Redskins continue to face a barrage of criticism for having a name that is seen as offensive to Native Americans.
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Tribe: Remove 'halfbreed' from Montana place names 31.7.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Leaders of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians say the time has come to remove the words "halfbreed" and "breed" from the names of creeks, lakes and other places around the state.
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