User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-National
Category: Indigenous Rights
Last updated: Mar 25 2017 03:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Disenrollments Place Washington Native American Tribe's Sovereignty In Jeopardy 25.3.2017 NPR: All Things Considered
The sovereignty of a Native American tribe in Washington state is in jeopardy. This comes after the tribe disenrolled about 15 percent of its members — members it says don't belong.
Don't be fooled by Trudeau's First Nations charm offensive 24.3.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
March 24, ...
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Yukon First Nations take territorial government to court 22.3.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Yukon First Nations take territorial government to court
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Op-ed: I'm banking on Zinke keeping our Bears Ears promises to Indians 19.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
I fear we are headed down an old and familiar path at Bears Ears. We promise Indian people that we will honor treaties, that we will recognize their rights to lands they have called home for millennia. We, the United States of America, make promises. Then, we break them. The Bears Ears National Monument proclamation isn’t a treaty, but the president’s words have the weight of law, granting new protections for a swath of public lands “profoundly sacred to many Native American tribes.” And now Ut...
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Norwegian Pension Fund Divests From Companies Behind DAPL 18.3.2017 NPR News
KLP is pulling millions of dollars it has invested in companies building and owning the Dakota Access Pipeline. The decision was reportedly driven by pressure from Norway's indigenous Sami peoples.
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The Native Nations Rise March: Kandi Mossett on How Standing Rock Lives On 16.3.2017 Truthout.com
The mobilization in DC helped people connect with each other beyond Standing Rock and organize to lobby Congress, says Kandi Mossett of the Indigenous Environmental Network. People came away from the march with a renewed sense that the power ultimately lies with them, and they have taken the fight to other pipeline sites, as well. Native Nations Rising encampment in Washington, DC, on March 13, 2017. (Photo: 350.org ) Since election night 2016, the streets of the US have rung with resistance. People all over the country have woken up with the conviction that they must do something to fight inequality in all its forms. But many are wondering what it is they can do. In this ongoing "Interviews for Resistance" series, experienced organizers, troublemakers and thinkers share their insights on what works, what doesn't, what has changed and what is still the same. Today's interview is the 21st in the series. Click here for the most recent interview before this one . Today we bring you a conversation about the ...
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'He Needs To Listen To Us.' Protesters Call On Trump To Respect Native Sovereignty 11.3.2017 NPR News
Demonstrators in Washington, D.C., were urging the Trump administration to meet with tribal leaders, and protesting the construction of the nearly complete Dakota Access Pipeline.
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Interior secretary pledges to work with tribes ‘government to government’ 9.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke said he supports “government-to-government” interactions between the federal government and Native American tribes in decision-making processes, a positive sign for members of indigenous communities advocating for more control over their land.
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American Indians to protest Washington pipeline 7.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
American Indians from across the country are bringing their frustrations with the Trump administration and its approval of the Dakota Access oil pipeline to the nation’s capital Tuesday, kicking off four days of activities that will culminate in a march on the White House. Tribal members and supporters plan to camp each day on the National Mall, with teepees, a ceremonial fire, cultural workshops and speakers. Native American leaders also plan to lobby lawmakers to protect tribal rights. “We are...
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American Indians protesting Trump, pipeline with march 7.3.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Members of American Indian tribes from around the country are gathering in Washington for four days of protests against the Trump administration and the Dakota Access oil pipeline that will culminate with a Friday march on the White House.
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UN official: Tribe not properly heard in pipeline dispute 3.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A United Nations official who visited North Dakota in the wake of months of protests over the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline believes the concerns and rights of Native Americans haven’t been adequately addressed. North Dakota Republican Gov. Doug Burgum says the state has respected legal protests and that it focused […]
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UN official: Tribe not properly heard in pipeline dispute 3.3.2017 AP National
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) -- A United Nations official who visited North Dakota in the wake of months of protests over the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline believes the concerns and rights of Native Americans haven't been adequately addressed....
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How Women of Color Have Broadened and Redefined Reproductive Rights 2.3.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Women of color in the US negotiate their reproductive lives in a system that combines various interlocking forms of oppression. The groups in Undivided Rights created their own definitions of reproductive rights -- definitions that are grounded in the experiences of their different communities and that link oppressions. It is because of these intersections that women of color advance a definition of reproductive rights beyond abortion.   A sonogram of Amanda Ralph's baby is viewed during a visit from Healthy Start, a nationwide, federally funded, nonprofit group now responsible for the most vulnerable pregnant women, at the Ralph home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on October 5, 2011. Nationally, Black babies are twice as likely as white infants to die before age 1, and in Pittsburgh, where the racial disparity is even sharper, health officials face many hurdles. (Photo: Jeff Swensen / The New York Times) For decades, Black, Native, Latina and Asian American women have led the fight to control their own ...
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AP Exclusive: Taxes could flow with Dakota Access pipeline 1.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota stands to gain more than $110 million annually in tax revenue after oil begins coursing through the Dakota Access pipeline. An analysis by The Associated Press shows the potential payoff for a state whose officials have supported the pipeline despite concerns from Native American tribes and other opponents who […]
AP Exclusive: Taxes could flow with Dakota Access pipeline 1.3.2017 AP National
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) -- North Dakota stands to gain more than $110 million annually in tax revenue after oil begins coursing through the Dakota Access pipeline....
Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard to headline Standing Rock benefit 1.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

All proceeds go to the Water Protector Legal Collective.
'We have never ceded our lands': B.C.'s interior First Nations and Kinder Morgan 28.2.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
February 28, ...
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Letter: Bears Ears area used by native peoples 24.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Supporting the initiative to revoke protection over Bears Ears National Monument in order to open up new areas for potential energy extraction or ranching is not as important as protecting tribal interests. The land is already in use. As well as being a sacred site for many different tribes, the land is used regularly for ceremonies and food collection. This land is not empty space, regional tribes tend to the land and find inherent value in its existence. The U.S. government has a shameful his...
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Border wall would cut across land sacred to Native tribe 23.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Tohono O'odham tribe on the U.S.-Mexico border says a wall would desecrate a mountain where they say their creator lives. Still, they want to help Donald Trump keep illegal border crossers out.
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Border Wall Would Cut Across Land Sacred To Native Tribe 23.2.2017 NPR: Morning Edition
The Tohono O'odham tribe on the U.S.-Mexico border says a wall would desecrate a mountain where they say their creator lives. Still, they want help Donald Trump keep illegal border crossers out.
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