User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-National
Category: Indigenous Rights
Last updated: Oct 22 2020 21:31 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Pollution Is a Racial Justice Issue. Let’s Fight it that Way. 22.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print Nangsao Witlawan, a resident of Thailand's Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate, where pollution contaminates nearby wells with mercury and other toxins. Photo by Laura Villadiego Around the world, communities of color and marginalized groups disproportionately feel the effects of pollution and other environmental impacts. Whether it’s residents living along the polluted Cooum River in Chennai, India ; Louisiana’s petrochemical-dense Cancer Alley ; Thailand’s toxic hot spot Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate ; or children living near a battery recycling factory in Naucalpan De Juárez, Mexico , environmental racism has long exposed poor people and people of color to dangerously high levels of lead, contaminated water and bad air . These communities suffer from high incidences of related ailments, such as cancer and asthma. Many have also witnessed the desecration of cultural landmarks . A Natural Resources Defense Council report issued last year, Watered Down Justice,  found that race is the factor that bears ...
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Blackhawks statue outside United Center covered in graffiti and red paint on Indigenous Peoples Day, police say 14.10.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
According to social media posts, the statue appeared to be the Blackhawk statue at the United Center. The vandalism occurred as many celebrated Indigenous Peoples Day, a day meant to reframe Columbus Day and honor Native American history and culture.
A Native Nation’s Impossible Fight to Stop Trump’s Wall From Dividing Its Land 9.10.2020 Mother Jones
In the remote California desert about 50 miles east of San Diego, five protesters gather around a backhoe parked at the US-Mexico border. The sun owns the cloudless sky, and dust coats everyone’s skin. A construction worker flips through a set of keys, preparing to dig a trench for a new stretch of President Trump’s […]
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Tribal lawsuit reveals San Diego County sheriff threatened to block access to reservations 9.9.2020 LA Times: Health

Lawsuit also sheds light on how quickly COVID-19 began affecting San Diego County casinos

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How Feds and States Make It Impossible for Tribal Epidemiologists to Do Their Jobs 25.8.2020 Mother Jones
When the H1N1 pandemic struck in 2009, epidemiologist Aurimar Ayala was working at the Maricopa County Public Health Department in Arizona. The department serves millions of people in the greater Phoenix area and handles about 80,000 reports of communicable disease infections per year. Each time someone in the county tested positive for the virus, Ayala’s team […]
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We Need More Indigenous Doctors, Stat. This Physician Has a Plan. 17.8.2020 Mother Jones
As the world grapples with the devastation of the coronavirus, one thing is clear: The United States simply wasn’t prepared. Despite repeated warnings from infectious disease experts over the years, we lacked essential beds, equipment, and medication; public health advice was confusing; and our leadership offered no clear direction while sidelining credible health professionals and institutions. Infectious […]
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How Native Tribes Started Winning at the Supreme Court 5.8.2020 Mother Jones
On a September morning in 2001, Native American leaders from across the country convened in a ballroom at the Grand Hyatt in Washington, DC to talk strategy. The Supreme Court was escalating a destructive war on tribal sovereignty, weakening the power of Indigenous nations to protect their people and lands. As the meeting opened, Sen. […]
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A Judge Just Handed the Standing Rock Tribe a Big Win in Their Dakota Access Pipeline Fight 6.7.2020 Mother Jones
After four years locked in legal struggle over the construction of the controversial 1,172 mile-long, Dakota Access Pipeline, the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes won a major victory on Monday when a federal court ordered the pipeline to cease its operations by August 5. Judge James E. Boasberg, from the US District Court […]
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Tribal Nations Enter Negotiations Over Colorado River Water 15.3.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in High Country News and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. The Colorado River Basin is the setting for some of the most drawn-out and complex water issues in the Western US. In 2019, the Colorado River Drought Contingency Plan—a water-conservation agreement between states, tribal nations and the […]
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California casinos asked to make changes as some card rooms close due to coronavirus outbreak 15.3.2020 LA Times: Health

Casinos, which often bring elderly people together in close proximity, present particular health challenges especially during the coronavirus outbreak.

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Louise Erdrich's grandfather inspired her new novel, 'The Night Watchman' 29.2.2020 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Louise Erdrich's new novel, set in the 1950s, follows a Native American tribe fighting for their rights as the U.S. Congress prepares to terminate their nation-to-nation treaties and land ownership rights.
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Thanks to Trump, Keystone XL Is Back. The Anti-Pipeline Movement Is Ready. 7.2.2020 Mother Jones
You may remember the Keystone XL pipeline from 2015, when a movement galvanized by the growing threat of climate change successfully pushed President Obama to reject the project. But Keystone XL, which would pump some of Canada’s most dangerous oil products over nearly 1,200 miles of US land and Indigenous territories largely for export to […]
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Marvin Manypenny, Minnesota American Indian activist, dies 28.1.2020 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Manypenny is being remembered as a dedicated fighter for tribal sovereignty. He and other activists argued for their cause across the country, testifying about the theft of White Earth Nation lands before a U.S. Senate committee in 1985.
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Munduruku tribe denounces illegal mining in Brazil 27.11.2019 Survival International
Munduruku people protest in front of the Ministry of Justice in Brazil, 2018 © Marcelo Camargo/Agência Brasil Leaders and representatives of the Munduruku tribe have denounced goldminers operating illegally in their territory in the Brazilian Amazon, and vowed they will not stop fighting until their problems are solved. The area around the Tapajós river is home to many Munduruku communities. It is one of the most heavily invaded indigenous territories, having been targeted by goldminers for some years. The tribe is angry and concerned about the increasing social and environmental impacts of the invasion. Brandishing a bottle of cloudy water from the Tapajos, Alessandra Munduruku said this week in the capital Brasília: “This dirty water is bringing death and disease to our people and our fish are full of mercury.” Last month the Munduruku blocked one of the roads in the region to protest against the mining invasion and released several statements to the pariwat (non-indigenous people) warning: “You are ...
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How US colonialism affects Indigenous peoples’ stewardship and access to food 9.11.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
From ceremonies to harvesting and food storage, to political leadership, to gender relations, indigenous groups have detailed understandings of how design societal institutions to support resilience. But colonialism changed that.
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Uprooted: The 1950's plan to erase Indian Country 4.11.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: News
In the 1950s, the United States government came up with a plan to solve what it called the "Indian problem." It would assimilate Native Americans by moving them to cities and eliminating reservations. The 20-year campaign failed to destroy Native cultures and tribal sovereignty, but its impact is still felt today.
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Washington tribe saves Snoqualmie Falls land, held sacred, from development 3.11.2019 LA Times: Nation

The Snoqualmie tribe is buying acreage around the majestic falls shown in the "Twin Peaks" TV series to prevent development on sacred land east of Seattle. The controversy has a lower profile than protests elsewhere, but the deal is a win for a Native American cause.

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Hydro company proposes to dam Little Colorado River east of Grand Canyon 9.10.2019 LA Times: Environment

A recently formed Phoenix-based company wants to construct dams for power generation on a tributary of the Colorado River beloved by rafters and canyon adventurers.

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Police Looking for Couple Who Scrawled Graffiti at Ancient Native American Gathering Place, Posted Photo on Instagram: 'They Seemed Pretty Proud of It' 4.9.2019 Newsweek Top Stories
Images posted onto social media show alleged grafitti over Labor Day at Illinois' Starved Rock Park.
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Cherokee Nation names first delegate to Congress 3.9.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Cherokee Nation is appointing former Obama advisor Kimberly Teehee as the tribe's first-ever delegate to the U.S. House. The position is outlined in an 1835 treaty but has never been filled.
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