User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-Independent
Category: Gender Issues
Last updated: Sep 10 2019 03:24 IST RSS 2.0
 
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'Inauthentic activity' on social media, abuse of progressive women in politics … is there a common thread? 9.9.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Is there a common thread running between reports Friday that a spike in "inauthentic activity" on social media just before the Alberta provincial election came from unidentified backers of the United Conservative Party and news stories Saturday about harassment of federal Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna? It would be impossible to make an evidentiary link between the use of disinformation bots on social media by supporters of conservative political parties and violent threats directed at women candidates and activists. Still, there's something more than timing that suggests the stream of false stories designed to rile up the conservative base , often reposted by high-profile conservatives, and the toxic abuse that sometimes threatens to overwhelm women candidates and office holders -- liberal ones in particular -- both have their roots in the role social media plays in the ecosystem of conservative activism. The analysis of the Alberta election by Rapid ...
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Lawmakers can address the MMIW crisis. Will they? 18.6.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Canada is taking major steps to stop the murder of Indigenous women and girls. The U.S. needs to do the same.
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Art gives powerful expression to issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women 12.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Krystalline Kraus Please chip in to support rabble's election 2019 coverage.  Support  rabble.ca  today for as little as $1 per month! A red dress has become the symbolic art-based representation of the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women. It’s a simple, beautiful and powerful symbol representing both women (the dress) and spirit (the colour red). Jamie Black is a Metis artist who is using the red dress in her work to draw attention to the issue of murdered and missing Indigenous women. She has collected over 600 red dresses, which have been displayed in places like Winnipeg as part of the REDress project, a play on the word "redress," defined as a remedy or the setting right of past indiscretions. Art has always been used as a language, especially to discuss difficult topics such as the genocide of Indigenous women. Estimates vary but the number of women and girls who have gone missing over the generations could be as high as 3,000. From 2001 to 2015, the homicide rate for Indigenous women in ...
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Western states work to shore up abortion access 31.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
‘State laws might become the law of the land.’
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Beware pro-choice memes normalizing Islamophobia 22.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada When a group of white, male, fundamentalist Christian Alabama legislators passed the most restrictive women's reproductive health law in the country last week, many seemingly progressive people immediately reacted in the logical fashion of a society in which Islamophobia is the default: they blamed Muslims. Indeed, you may have found yourself liking the memes that said "Sharia Law Arrives in Alabama" or "Meet the American Taliban." Maybe you were one of those who posted the inflammatory meme that posited a scenario in which an "Iranian court" ruled that an 11-year-old girl who'd been raped had to carry the baby to term, followed by the interruption that this is in fact a scenario being played out by Ohio Republicans. Part of the illogic of racism is that white people can never see themselves as capable of producing such outrageous injustices without first being perniciously infected with some kind of foreign ideological agent. While everything from flash floods to teen promiscuity was ...
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The war on women is still on 17.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
On Wednesday, in the wake of the majority vote by 25 white Republican men in the senate of one of the most impoverished states in the U.S., #AlabamaAbortionBan was trending both south and north of the Canadian border. Also trending, #Talabama. That's because the Alabama abortion ban is one of the most draconian revocations of women's rights since women won the vote, a ban that would force even 11-year-old victims of rape and incest to carry to term. These forced birthers want to take down Roe v. Wade, the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision that rendered abortion bans unconstitutional. And why not try to reverse it now, what with Donald Trump and his Republican-controlled Senate packing the bench with conservative judges? If successful, Alabama would bar "abortion and attempted abortion" by women "known" to be pregnant, whatever that means. The only exception is to "prevent a serious health risk to the unborn child's mother." As for doctors performing the procedure, they are looking at up to 99 years in ...
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Freedom of expression is central to our democracy 2.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Harold Shuster Sid Frankel Freedom of expression and the right to hold diverse opinions are central to our liberal democracy. The state has no right to intervene in events like "Sorry Not Sorry: Unapologetically Working for Social Justice," the panel discussion held by the Social Planning Council of Winnipeg and the Canadian Muslim Women's Institute, unless there is strong evidence that hate speech will occur. Otherwise, the state needs to take a hands-off approach.  Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman took a shoot-the-messenger stance recently when he declared that Linda Sarsour, a Palestinian-American community activist who has raised legitimate criticisms of the State of Israel, was too controversial and not welcome in Winnipeg simply because he finds some of her comments personally offensive. Bowman seems to have forgotten that he is the mayor and not a private citizen expressing his personal prejudices. Sarsour was invited to Winnipeg to speak about building effective progressive movements across cultures ...
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With Trump's support, campaign to criminalize abortion ramps up 25.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics Before he became president, Donald Trump described himself as pro-choice. Now, he can't do enough to deny women control of their own bodies. Marching in lockstep with Vice President Mike Pence and some of the most anti-choice members of his right-wing coalition, Trump has gone global in his crusade, watering down a United Nations Security Council resolution aimed at stopping rape and sexual violence in war. His acting UN ambassador threatened to veto any resolution containing language referring to "reproductive health." The goal of the demand, most observers agree, is to ensure that women who are raped in war should not receive any help terminating pregnancies. This episode is just the most recent in the accelerating and increasingly successful campaign to criminalize abortion, waged by a vocal, well-funded minority in this country. For close to half a century, the right to a safe, legal abortion has been guaranteed by the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Roe v. Wade decision. For many years, ...
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Why the queer Mormon policy reversal is not enough 25.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Mormon suicide has deeper roots — and demands more change — than the church’s reversal of its exclusion policy.
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Bigotry, ignorance and high school basketball in Montana 28.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Oppression of tribal nations denies our shared potential to harness the power of sport.
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Liberal budget leaves behind Indigenous women and children -- again 21.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Pamela Palmater As expected, the Assembly of First Nations was first out of the gate offering glowing praise for this Liberal government's federal budget, followed shortly thereafter by the Metis National Council and Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami -- the three male-dominated national Aboriginal organizations. Their organizations have seen substantial increases in funding for their political organizations in recent years. Meanwhile, the Native Women's Association of Canada -- the only political organization representing Indigenous women at the national level -- issued its own press release criticizing the government for failing Indigenous women. They accused the federal government of, once again, ignoring the pressing needs of Indigenous women and in so doing, not only hampering reconciliation but breaching their core human rights. NWAC is especially aggrieved about this lack of funding for Indigenous women and families, given the urgent need to address murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls. The ...
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Canadian media not connecting the dots on femicide 8.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Media Matters Last month, shortly before midnight, hundreds of thousands of Ontarians were jolted awake by blaring sounds coming from their smart phones or interruptions in their regularly scheduled TV programming. A little girl, spending the afternoon with her father, had not been returned home on time. Her mother had reason to fear the worst. And, tragically, she had cause. The Amber Alert for Riya Rajkumar, murdered by her father on her 11th birthday, inspired mainly three reactions. Many people complained on emergency lines and social media about having been disturbed from their slumber. Many other people scolded them for beefing when a little girl's life was at stake. And many others showed up at candlelight vigils for a child clearly caught between warring parents. Riya's father, injured when arrested, would, within days, die in hospital -- just another murder-suicide statistic in the sad annals of domestic violence. Unsurprisingly, after the floral and teddy bear tributes were buried under the ...
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A partial list of attacks on women's rights under Doug Ford 7.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tina Beier Since June, Doug Ford's government has taken steps to systematically undermine women's rights. On their own, the funding cuts to the Ontario College of Midwives, clawbacks to raises for early childhood educators, and the reversion to the 1996 sex-ed, would not seem as insidious. But taken together, Ford's government is demonstrating it has an anti-women agenda. The most obvious attack is the cutting of funding towards the Ontario College of Midwives . On November 8, 2018, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care advised the College that the government would no longer provide it with operational grants, which encompass over one-third of the College's budget. The College is instrumental in providing midwives with patient safety training. Midwives are a predominantly women-identifying workforce, compared to other primary healthcare providers who also provide low-risk pregnancy, delivery, and post-birth care to women. In 2018, the Association of Ontario Midwives won a landmark pay equity case , ...
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Racist policing plagues Portland’s nightclubs 18.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A reckoning is coming for Oregon’s white supremacist past.
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How Indigenous reporters are elevating true crime 2.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In the podcasts “Finding Cleo” and “Thunder Bay,” First Nations reporters reinvent a common formula. Can they find even bigger audiences?
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Senate hears stories of Indian Country’s missing and murdered 13.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Data gaps, understaffing and lax investigations have deepened the crisis.
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What the Violence Against Women Act could do in Indian Country — and one major flaw 11.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Women from 228 tribes in Alaska and four in Maine still aren’t protected by the act.
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U.S. Senator Jeff Flake's elevator confrontation shows the power of women 4.10.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics As U.S. President Donald Trump's nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court seemed to be reaching a controversial conclusion last week, a remarkable encounter took place on live television. Two women confronted a senator and changed the course of history. Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake had just put out a statement that he intended to vote for Kavanaugh, who stands accused of multiple counts of sexual assault. Ana Maria Archila and Maria Gallagher, who were in a Senate office building as part of a massive mobilization opposed to Kavanaugh's nomination, noticed Flake rushing to a "senators only" elevator. As he got in, they held the elevator door, challenging Flake, explaining that they were survivors of sexual assault. Shortly after, Flake cast his "yes" vote in the Senate Judiciary Committee, but conditioned his support, saying, "It would be proper to delay the floor vote for one week for an FBI investigation." When the history of this moment is written, it cannot be about a ...
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'Bombs not homes' defines Trudeau's feminist foreign policy 28.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada As Canada's three main political parties prepare for the 2019 election, there is one issue on which they will all agree: there will be no challenge to Canada's bloated war economy. While right-wing parties will rail against government waste and improper spending (an attack they usually aim at social programs that on the whole function well and would perform even better if properly funded), the federal War Department receives no such criticism, even when its fiscal mismanagement is well documented . So infused is the myth of Canadian benevolence on the world stage that no one from the NDP, Liberals or Conservatives will raise a scintilla of dissent regarding the already enormous $20-billion annual investment in an organization that regularly produces questionable financial audits, continues to cover up its role in war crimes such as the torture of Afghan detainees, and treats its veterans with a degree of disrespect that is beyond reprehensible. To date, no one sitting in Parliament has ...
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Justice for Our Stolen Children Camp stands up for Indigenous children 28.8.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Pamela Palmater The violent deaths of Colten Boushie in Saskatchewan and Tina Fontaine in Manitoba hit their families, communities and First Nations pretty hard. These were youths who had their whole lives ahead of them. The fact that deep-seated institutional and societal racism and violence against Indigenous peoples is what led to their deaths is a glaring injustice that we have seen happen many times over to our people. But the other glaring injustice is how institutional and societal racism and violence allows the killers of our people to walk free. The high level of impunity for lethal race-based violence against Indigenous peoples serves only to reinforce the racist idea that Indigenous lives don't matter. Without intervention from federal, provincial and municipal governments, agencies and police forces, our people will continue to be at risk. Canada's failure to act on this crisis means that First Nations must continue to take action to stand against these injustices which are killing our ...
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