User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-Independent
Category: Indigenous Rights
Last updated: Dec 09 2019 23:28 IST RSS 2.0
 
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This Cherokee congressman is for Trump – and Indian Country 9.12.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Markwayne Mullin, who is hard-right and white-passing, may not seem like an Indigenous lawmaker, but he’s no anomaly.
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Arizona volleyball team faces harassment 25.11.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Native American athletes continue to experience racism.
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How US colonialism affects Indigenous peoples’ stewardship and access to food 9.11.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
From ceremonies to harvesting and food storage, to political leadership, to gender relations, indigenous groups have detailed understandings of how design societal institutions to support resilience. But colonialism changed that.
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A hunt for tribal recognition at the U.S.-Canada border 28.10.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Rick Desautel shot an elk to prove the Arrow Lakes Band — unrecognized as a First Nation in Canada — still exists.
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The U.S. stole generations of Indigenous children to open the West 14.10.2019 Current Issue
Indian boarding schools held Native American youth hostage in exchange for land cessions.
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Extinction Rebellion stages 'bitumen spill' outside prime minister's office 25.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
In response to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's approval of the Trans Mountain tar sands pipeline on June 18, Extinction Rebellion Ottawa organized a "bitumen spill" the following afternoon outside his office in downtown Ottawa. Extinction Rebellion billed the action as "taking the Trans Mountain fight to the prime minister's doorstep." There are many reasons to oppose the 890,000-barrels-per-day tar sands pipeline. It violates Indigenous sovereignty and lacks the free, prior and informed consent of numerous First Nations. There are 133 First Nations on or near the route of the 1,150-kilometre pipeline. Almost 520 kilometres of that route would cross the Secwepemc Nation without their consent. Furthermore, only 43 First Nations have signed "mutual benefit agreements" (which should not be confused with their free, prior and informed consent for the pipeline). The pipeline would emit massive amounts of carbon pollution. It would produce an estimated 26 million tonnes of upstream and 60 million tonnes of ...
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The Cherokee Nation’s next chief will have a big footprint in Indian Country 29.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Saturday’s election in the largest Native American tribe could shape policy and law in tribal communities across the country.
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Public lands top Rep. Debra Haaland’s agenda 24.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
One of the first Native American women elected to Congress is fighting fossil fuel development on ‘the most pristine and beautiful places in our country.’
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Indigenous educators fight for an accurate history of California 29.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
The Golden State is ignoring a history of violence against Native Americans.
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Indian Country can help solve rural America’s decline 22.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Tribal homelands have an edge for luring tourist dollars and retaining communities.
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Arms industry a significant force in the suppression of Indigenous peoples 8.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson The weapons industry plays a significant role in the ongoing oppression of Indigenous peoples. The weapons that are used by the military, para-military groups and police against Indigenous peoples are manufactured, bought, sold, provided as aid and generate profit. They are used to suppress territorial sovereignty and to contain struggles in defence of land and water. Historically, Popular Mechanics has noted, "The U.S. Army used the Gatling [manual machine gun that could fire 200 rounds per minute] extensively throughout the 1870s during its campaigns against Native American tribes in the West." In more recent times, a mine-resistant, ambush-protected (MRAP) armoured vehicle was deployed by police against Indigenous land and water defenders opposed to the Dakota Access Pipeline on their territories in North Dakota. In this country, tanks, Grizzly infantry fighting vehicles, trucks and artillery pieces were deployed in and around Kanehsatà:ke and Kahnawake during the Oka Crisis in 1990. ...
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How ‘pretendians’ undermine the rights of Indigenous people 2.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
We must guard against harmful public discourse about Native identity as much as we guard against harmful policy.
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Bigotry, ignorance and high school basketball in Montana 28.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Oppression of tribal nations denies our shared potential to harness the power of sport.
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Is a new copyright law a ‘colonization of knowledge’? 5.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Indigenous oral histories have often been recorded and sold without permission.
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Federal shutdowns cut deep in Indian Country 12.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
At the annual State of Indian Nations address, tribal leaders called on feds to do their part.
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Harvey Weinstein and a broken promise in Indian Country 7.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Despite an agreement, royalties from ‘Wind River’ haven’t reached the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center.
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Fact check: the Goldwater Institute’s statements about the Indian Child Welfare Act 20.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
The Institute’s claim that ICWA harms Indian children relies on dubious assertions and dog whistles.
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Harnessing the wind to help a sovereign culture thrive 1.11.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
An unprecedented partnership uniting six tribes of the Sioux Nation is poised to leverage one of the country’s strongest wind resources across North and South Dakota, accelerating the shift to clean energy, breaking decades of generational poverty, and creating a long-term path to self-sufficiency for the Cheyenne River, Flandreau Santee, Oglala, Rosebud, Standing Rock and Yankton Sioux Tribes.
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Recognition of Indigenous rights or termination of rights framework? 8.8.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Joyce Green Gina Starblanket The Trudeau government is committed to table legislation on a Recognition of Rights Framework for Indigenous Rights this fall. While not yet finalized, the initial drafts are not encouraging. Beware of federal politicians bearing beads and trinkets. This framework is not emancipatory, and, despite effusive press releases from the prime minister, has nothing to do with reconciliation. The feds are proposing a framework that functions like a cage, containing Indigenous nations and governments within a legal apparatus that assumes all sovereignty and jurisdiction belongs to the federal and provincial governments. The cage provides Indigenous nations with little more than space to administer federally approved governance within legislated boundaries. No land commitments accompany the framework, and its principles fall far below the floor set by Canadian constitutional law, Indigenous laws, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). The third ...
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Assembly of First Nations 2018 election is a battle for sovereignty 19.7.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Assembly of First Nations 2018 election is a battle for sovereignty
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