User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-Independent
Category: Criminal Justice System
Last updated: Aug 29 2018 02:11 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Hacker whose tools caused chaos must repay 70,000 or face further jail time 26.3.2018 Science / Technology News

A computer hacker who was jailed after setting up a business which caused chaos all over the world must pay back nearly A 70,000 or face another two years behind bars. Adam Mudd was just 16 when he created his Titanium Stresser program, which was used to carry out more than 1.7 million attacks on websites including Minecraft, Xbox Live, and gamers' communications tool TeamSpeak.

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A Call to the Media: Let's Go Beyond "Preserving Democracy" 21.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Image: Lauren Walker / Truthout / Shutterstock ) In the face of Trump's theatrics around "fake news" and "the media," it's easy to forget that mainstream media have themselves long served the forces of state-sanctioned violence and white supremacy in the US by helping to maintain the inequities that make democracy impossible. Moving forward, let's make journalism flourish as a force for dismantling and creating, rather than preserving the old normal. Truthout readers like you made this story possible. Show your support for independent news: Make a tax-deductible donation today! This story is the sixth in Truthout's "Visions of 2018" series, in which activist leaders answer the question: "What would you like to see created, built, imagined or begun this year?" Each piece will focus on a bold idea for transformation, to give us fuel as the year moves forward. In 2004, I attended a daylong "training" session for journalists, led by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The goal, we were told, was to ...
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#MeToo Behind Bars: When the Sexual Assaulter Holds the Keys to Your Cell 18.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Image: ostill, Piyathep / Shutterstock; Edited: JR / TO) As the #MeToo movement grows, it's important to remember that in jails and prisons across the country, incarcerated people -- especially trans and gender nonconforming persons -- are daily subject to sexual harassment, abuse and assault. The abuse, often at the hands of staff who hold the keys to the cells, frequently goes unreported by victims and witnesses for fear of retaliation. (Image: ostill, Piyathep / Shutterstock; Edited: JR / TO) Exposing the wrongdoing of those in power has never been more important. Support Truthout's independent, investigative journalism by making a donation! In January, Strawberry Hampton, a trans woman incarcerated in Illinois, settled a lawsuit about repeated sexual and physical abuse she'd experienced by prison staff in the state's men's prisons. What she endured isn't limited to Illinois prisons, or to men's prisons. Across the country, thousands of incarcerated people face sexual harassment, abuse and assault, ...
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Our society's double standards in the application of due process 9.3.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada We live in a strange era. An era of deep polarization of views. An era of flagrant contradictions. An era of erosion of principles of justice. My husband, Maher Arar, a Canadian citizen born and raised in Syria, faced a public trial in 2002 while he was the victim of extraordinary rendition initiated by U.S. authorities with the complicity of Canadian law enforcement as well as Jordanian and Syrian authorities, official and de facto allies of the U.S. war on terror. When my husband was given a paper in his U.S. cell stating that he had been arrested because of his alleged association with Al-Qaeda, he didn't get a lawyer or day in court. He was transported in the middle of the night to an airport where a private jet, known as a ghost plane, flew him to Amman, Jordan. But many people in Canada believed that the U.S. couldn't be mistaken, people who included politicians, journalists and regular Canadian citizens. When former U.S. president George W. Bush infamously said in 2001, "you are ...
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Killing Children in the Age of Disposability: The Parkland Shooting Was About More Than Gun Violence 4.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
People embrace as students return to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Wednesday February 28, 2018, in Parkland, Florida. A mass shooting on February 14 at the school left 17 people dead. (Photo: Matt McClain / The Washington Post via Getty Images) The current debate about school shootings reveals a neoliberal order that has tipped over into authoritarianism where the highest measure of how a society judges itself ethically and politically is no longer about how it treats and invests in its children. How else to explain the fact that mass shootings of children are now discussed in terms of containing their effects rather than eliminating their causes. People embrace as students return to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Wednesday February 28, 2018 in Parkland, Florida. A mass shooting on February 14 at the school left 17 people dead. (Photo: Matt McClain / The Washington Post via Getty Images) Exposing the wrongdoing of those in power has never been more important. Support Truthout's ...
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Disappeared by the State: What Tuesday's Supreme Court Decision on Indefinite Detention Means for Immigrants 28.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Tuesday's Supreme Court ruling allowing immigrants to be detained indefinitely is a continuation of a political project that was expanding its reach, grinding immigrants and others under its wheels long before Trump. Many of the affected immigrants have an Indigenous connection to this land, which makes their disappearance into the carceral system yet another reflection of the US's origins as a country. Immigrants and supporters march past the Metropolitan Detention Center as undocumented people jailed inside tap on the windows in opposition to the President Trump order end to DACA on September 5, 2017, in Los Angeles, California. (Photo: David McNew / Getty Images) On Tuesday, the Supreme Court ruled that US immigration officials can detain immigrants within the US indefinitely, without offering periodic bond hearings. Immigrants with permanent legal status and those seeking asylum would not be exempt from this policy. In 2015, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that immigrants must be given a bond ...
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"Pro-Immigrant" Liberalism and Capitalist Exploitation: Why Corporate Democrats Do Not Support Immigrant Justice 18.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Rep. Luis Gutierrez and Rep. Kyrsten Sinema pose for photos with immigration reform activists after a discussion on immigration reform October 23, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. With the fate of DACA up in the air, Democrats have been relatively silent on the plight of nearly 10 million other undocumented immigrants. (Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images) The immigration debate, which teeters between racist vitriol from the right-wing and pro-immigrant discourse from corporate liberals and multicultural elites, deliberately ignores the fundamental issue of exploitation under a capitalist system. Immigrant workers are, above all, a means to turn a profit for both those in the detention and deportation business as well as industries that thrive on cheap labor. Rep. Luis Gutierrez and Rep. Kyrsten Sinema pose for photos with immigration reform activists after a discussion on immigration reform October 23, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. With the fate of DACA up in the air, Democrats have been ...
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How We Get Free: An Organizing Story and a Love Letter 15.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Cherelle Baldwin (center), mom Cynthia Long (left) and organizer Mary Shields from California Coalition of Women Prisoners (right) hold a banner prepared by Moms United Against Violence and Incarceration, which lists the names of criminalized survivors. (Photo: Holly Krig) Women and gender non-conforming people of color who defend themselves against domestic violence and sexual assault often end up imprisoned for the "crime." Recent efforts by community organizations to free the wrongfully imprisoned survivors have also challenged us to think about all incarceration as a criminalization of survivors of violence of one form or another -- especially, the violence of poverty -- that should end. Cherelle Baldwin (center), mom Cynthia Long (left) and organizer Mary Shields from California Coalition of Women Prisoners (right) hold a banner prepared by Moms United Against Violence and Incarceration, which lists the names of criminalized survivors. (Photo: Holly Krig) This Truthout original was only possible ...
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Trump's Campaign of Terror Against Immigrants 9.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In these troubling and surreal times, honest journalism is more important than ever. Help us keep real news flowing: Make a donation to Truthout today. The racist extortionist in the White House has issued an ultimatum: either he gets every item on his list of extremist anti-immigrant measures -- or 1.8 million immigrants will suffer. And to show what they'll face, Trump's Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency is stepping up its campaign of anti-immigrant terror across the country -- everything from a newly official policy to hunt down the undocumented at courthouses to a huge operation specifically targeting sanctuary cities in California. Trump even said this week that he would "love" to see another government shutdown if Democrats didn't capitulate to every last demand, including the "great" wall on the border. DREAMer Juan Escalante rightly called this a "racist ransom note" -- the offer of some form of legal status for 1.8 million immigrant youth in return for the border wall, more Border ...
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Who Are the Holy Land Foundation Five? 9.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In 2004 federal agents raided and arrested five Palestinian-American fathers, who had been leaders of a Texas-based charity called the Holy Land Foundation. This resulted in lengthy prison sentences for the men, who the government accused of "supporting terrorism" by donating to charities in Palestine that the US government itself had long worked with. People are seen at Qalandiya military checkpoint, located between Jerusalem and Ramallah on February 9, 2018, in Ramallah, West Bank. (Photo: Issam Rimawi / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images) In July 2004, federal agents raided the homes of five Palestinian-American families, arresting the fathers, who had been leaders of a Texas-based charity called the Holy Land Foundation. Until 9/11, the HLF was the largest Muslim charity in the United States, but in December 2001 the federal government shuttered the organization and seized its assets. The first trial of the HLF-5, held in 2007, ended in a hung jury. The second trial was marked by highly questionable ...
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Bresha Meadows, Teenage Girl Who Killed Her Abusive Father, Finally Freed After 10 Months in Jail 7.2.2018 Truthout.com

In Ohio, a 16-year-old girl who killed her abusive father is finally home from juvenile detention, after her case sparked national outcry over the treatment of domestic violence survivors. The young girl, Bresha Meadows, was just 14 years old when she shot dead her abusive father, Jonathan Meadows, with a bullet to his head as he slept. Only two months earlier, Bresha had run away from home, telling relatives that she was scared for her life "because her father was beating her mother and threatening to kill the whole family." Bresha was sentenced to a year in juvenile detention, with credit for time served, as well as six months at a mental health treatment center. We speak to journalist Victoria Law, who has been closely following the story.

Please check back later for full transcript.

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CBI rules out remission for Abu Salem 6.2.2018 Mumbai – The Indian Express
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Arthur Road Jail: Month after failed suicide bid, prisoner ‘hangs himself’ 6.2.2018 Mumbai – The Indian Express
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There Has Been Absolutely No Movement on Guantánamo at All 30.1.2018 Truthout.com
January 11 marked 16 years since the opening of the military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, specifically designed to be beyond the reach of US law and away from public view. Guantánamo is a monument to the lawlessness and cruelty of the US after September 11, 2001, throwing over civil rights and liberties under the pretense of defending the country.   Razor wire lines the fence of the 'Gitmo' detention center on October 22, 2016 at the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. (Photo: John Moore / Getty Images) In these troubling and surreal times, honest journalism is more important than ever. Help us keep real news flowing: Make a donation to Truthout today. Janine Jackson: , holding only Muslim men and boys, many without charge or trial. Guantánamo is a monument to the lawlessness and cruelty of the US after September 11, 2001, throwing over civil rights and liberties under the pretense of defending the country from those who "hate us for" them. For as long as it's been open, activists, attorneys ...
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The Deportation Machine That Thrives on Terror 22.1.2018 Truthout.com
Jorge Garcia's wife and two teenage children sobbed as he was forced onto a plane bound for Mexico from Detroit on January 15. After more than 30 years living uneventfully in the US, the 39-year-old Garcia was deported. Garcia did everything right -- he paid his taxes, worked as a landscaper to support his family, and never had so much as a parking ticket. But because his efforts -- he spent more than $125,000 in legal fees since 2005 -- to find a way to documented status failed, the US government kicked him out. According to the Detroit Free Press , Garcia was given a deportation order by the courts in 2009, but under the Obama administration, he had received repeated stays of removal. The Trump administration has reversed the longstanding policy of allowing such stays. And because Garcia doesn't qualify for consideration under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program -- he was brought to the US as a child, but DACA doesn't cover people born before 1981 -- the Garcia family have had ...
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Myanmar trial set to begin for 2 Reuters journalists 9.1.2018 World – The Indian Express
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Trashed: Inside the Deadly World of Private Garbage Collection 6.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Private garbage trucks are ubiquitous on New York's streets after dark, yet the human effort involved remains largely invisible to most people. To travel deep into the world of New York's midnight trash collection is to enter a realm where people often toil in grave danger for low pay. Waste removal is one of the most dangerous jobs in the country. On the darkened streets of New York City, it's a race for survival. (Photo: Eden, Janine and Jim ) Shortly before 5 a.m. on a recent November night, a garbage truck with a New York Yankees decal on the side sped through a red light on an empty street in the Bronx. The two workers aboard were running late. Before long, they would start getting calls from their boss. "Where are you on the route? Hurry up, it shouldn't take this long." Theirs was one of 133 garbage trucks owned by Action Carting, the largest waste company in New York City, which picks up the garbage and recycling from 16,700 businesses. Going 20 miles per hour above the city's 25 mph limit, the ...
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How One Mississippi Teen Went 1,266 Days Behind Bars Before Receiving a Mental Evaluation 1.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Michael Gaida ) On Nov. 17, 2012, Tyler Haire was arrested in Vardaman, Mississippi, for attacking his father's girlfriend with a knife. Tyler, 16, had called 911 himself, and when they arrived, the local police found him seated quietly on a tree stump outside the home on County Road 433. The boy alternately said he could remember nothing and that they had the wrong man. Tyler was taken to the county jail in Pittsboro, 12 miles away, where the sheriff, worried that the awkward and overweight boy might hurt himself or be targeted by other inmates, placed him in a cell used for solitary confinement. Tyler had turned 17 by the time, five months later, a grand jury indicted him for aggravated assault, and his case went before a judge. Tyler's defense lawyer, appointed by the court, informed the judge in a court filing that his attempts at speaking with the boy had made it apparent the 17-year-old did not have "sufficient mental capacity" to understand the charge he was facing. The lawyer wanted Tyler ...
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Henry A. Giroux on Developing a Language of Liberation for Radical Transformation 10.12.2017 Truthout.com
At the moment, people in the US are enduring a numbing assault from an authoritarianism brought to full fruition under Donald Trump. However, a galvanizing hope can shape a new vision and activism that will be transformative in the battle against an oppressive capitalism, says author and scholar Henry A. Giroux, who talked to Truthout about his new book, The Public in Peril. Hundreds of University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee students protest a Trump campaign rally on their campus, January 1, 2014. Protests by young people could become illegal in the future, according to Henry A. Giroux. (Image: Joe Brusky / Flickr ) What are the longer-term trends that gave rise to the presidency of Donald Trump? What will be the national and global impacts? And what do we need to do to resist? Henry A. Giroux tackles these questions in The Public in Peril: Trump and the Menace of American Authoritarianism. "This courageous and timely book is the first and best book on Trump's neo-fascism in the making," says Cornel West. ...
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A Dubious Arrest, a Compromised Prosecutor, a Tainted Plea: How One Murder Case Exposes the System 9.12.2017 Truthout.com
Demetrius Smith's troubling ordeal is a road map of nearly every way the justice system breaks down -- and how easily a cascade of bad outcomes can be triggered by one small miscarriage of justice. (Photo:  StefanieKaufmann ) The case of Demetrius Smith reads like a preposterous legal thriller: dubious arrests, two lying sex workers, prosecutorial fouls and a judge who backpedaled out of a deal. It also delivers a primer on why defendants often agree to virtually inescapable plea deals for crimes they didn't commit. ProPublica has spent the past year  exploring wrongful convictions  and the tools prosecutors use to avoid admitting mistakes, including an arcane deal known as an Alford plea that allows defendants to maintain their innocence while still pleading guilty. Earlier this year,  we examined a dozen such cases in Baltimore . Smith's troubling ordeal, Alford plea included, is a road map of nearly every way the justice system breaks down -- and how easily a cascade of bad outcomes can be triggered ...
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