User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-Independent
Category: Criminal Justice System
Last updated: Oct 04 2019 23:27 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Will kids who received a life sentence for their crimes get a second chance? 4.10.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Adult punishment for children is still ordered despite research showing that rational decision-making skills develop with age.
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Assange case could deal a major blow to U.S. press freedom 14.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Please chip in to support rabble's election 2019 coverage.  Support  rabble.ca  today for as little as $1 per month! "Congress shall make no law … abridging the freedom of speech or of the press," reads the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Yet, for the first time ever, a publisher is being prosecuted under the First World War-era Espionage Act. Julian Assange, co-founder of the whistleblower website Wikileaks, is facing 170 years in prison if he is extradited to the U.S. from the United Kingdom. The case could deal a monumental blow to the free press in the United States . The U.S. first charged Assange in April with attempting to help a U.S. Army whistleblower break into a military computer system, for which Assange would face up to five years in prison. Then, on May 23, the Justice Department released a superseding indictment, with the additional 17 espionage charges. The new charges, The New York Times editorial board wrote on the day they were announced, "could have a chilling effect on ...
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Ava DuVernay's powerful film re-examines the Central Park Jogger case 6.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics It has been more than 30 years since a rape and attempted murder occurred in New York City that became known as the Central Park Jogger case. The crime itself was indescribably vicious; the miscarriage of justice that followed -- with five African American and Latino boys who became known as the Central Park Five framed for the crime and sent to prison -- remains a blight on the criminal justice system. The five boys spent years behind bars, losing their youth in the process. Eventually, their convictions were vacated after the actual perpetrator confessed in jail. His confession was supported by irrefutable DNA evidence. When the teens were first arrested, Donald Trump, then a New York real estate developer, actively campaigned for the death penalty for the young defendants, taking out full-page ads in all of New York City's major newspapers. To this day, ignoring all evidence, President Trump maintains that they are guilty. These injustices have been poignantly captured in a damning, ...
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How a tiny endangered species put a man in prison 15.4.2019 Current Issue
The Devils Hole pupfish is nothing to mess with.
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Christchurch happens every day in the war of terror 19.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
World As we mourn the victims of the terrorist atrocity in New Zealand -- where at least 50 Muslim worshippers were mowed down by a white supremacist partially "inspired" by Donald Trump -- many are looking for answers to the inevitable questions of why and how. To answer those questions, and explore how we might prevent such terrorist acts, it may be helpful to recognize that what happened at Christchurch -- mass murder produced as the logical result of a long-running political epoch that is almost singularly defined by the dehumanization and demonization of Muslims, Arabs, and anyone perceived as such -- happens every day. As in any war, atrocities are the norm, not the aberration. In the war of terror that has been waged by so-called Western democracies for decades -- long before 9/11 -- governments and militaries, their compliant media partners, the so-called entertainment industry, and a host of others have played the role of initiators, accomplices, and accelerants to a fiery hatred of all things ...
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Justice for Our Stolen Children Camp stands up for Indigenous children 28.8.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Pamela Palmater The violent deaths of Colten Boushie in Saskatchewan and Tina Fontaine in Manitoba hit their families, communities and First Nations pretty hard. These were youths who had their whole lives ahead of them. The fact that deep-seated institutional and societal racism and violence against Indigenous peoples is what led to their deaths is a glaring injustice that we have seen happen many times over to our people. But the other glaring injustice is how institutional and societal racism and violence allows the killers of our people to walk free. The high level of impunity for lethal race-based violence against Indigenous peoples serves only to reinforce the racist idea that Indigenous lives don't matter. Without intervention from federal, provincial and municipal governments, agencies and police forces, our people will continue to be at risk. Canada's failure to act on this crisis means that First Nations must continue to take action to stand against these injustices which are killing our ...
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Members of MOVE 9 remain in prison 40 years after police attack 9.8.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics Forty years ago this week, on Aug. 8, 1978, Philadelphia police launched a massive attack on the house of MOVE, a radical, back-to-nature, anti-police-brutality and largely African-American organization. As MOVE's women and children huddled in the basement, firefighters blasted the house with at least four high-pressure fire hoses, filling the cellar with water. Police used a bulldozer and fired tear gas into the house. One young MOVE member, Delbert Orr Africa (MOVE members assumed the surname "Africa" in honor of the group's founder, John Africa), emerged shirtless from the house, with arms raised. With TV cameras rolling, police mercilessly beat him, kicking him in the ribs and head. Amidst a burst of gunfire that morning, Philadelphia Police Officer James Ramp was killed. While all MOVE members denied using firearms, nine were convicted of third-degree murder for the officer's death, each given 30- to 100-year sentences. They became known as the "MOVE 9." Veteran Philadelphia journalist ...
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The torturers' bargain: Crime and no punishment, but many rewards 6.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada Despite being deeply implicated in some of the worst crimes of the Bush administration's torture regime, Gina Haspel has been promoted to Director of the CIA. Haspel managed the CIA's Site Green detention camp in Thailand, the  blueprint  for the rest of the Agency's "black sites" around the world: a matrix of secret prisons where the captives could be brutalized with impunity. Black site detainees were broken physically and psychologically; kept naked, beaten, hooded, waterboarded, threatened with electric chairs and military dogs, sexually abused (including through medically unnecessary rectal feedings so forceful the effects resembled those of violent rape), locked in boxes filled with insects, and forced to lie in their own excrement. One lost an eye, at least two died, and many hallucinated or begged to be killed. Even more damningly, it turned out that almost one-quarter of the detainees had been sucked into the CIA's system of black holes completely by mistake, according to the ...
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Indian businessman convicted of sexually assaulting woman he met on dating website: report 1.6.2018 World – The Indian Express
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Journalist Manuel Duran's arrest is a blow against press freedom and immigration rights 27.4.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
President Donald Trump's crackdown on immigrants and his dislike for the news media collided in Memphis this month, as a well-known journalist was arrested while covering a protest against immigration detention, then was handed over to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) authorities for deportation. On April 3, Manuel Duran was outside the Shelby County jail in Memphis, reporting on the protest for the Spanish-language news site he runs, Memphis Noticias. Fifteen minutes into his livestream, police told him, "Get out of the street." Duran asked where to go, but before he could comply, one officer ordered other riot police, "Get him, guys." As the police dragged him away, two protesters latched on to Duran in a protective embrace, shouting, "He's a journalist!" Duran was charged with blocking a roadway and disorderly conduct, charges that were promptly dropped. Rather than releasing him, on April 5 the Shelby sheriff handed him over to ICE. He was transported six hours south to the LaSalle ...
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Journalist Manuel Duran's arrest is a blow for press freedom and immigration rights 27.4.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
President Donald Trump's crackdown on immigrants and his dislike for the news media collided in Memphis this month, as a well-known journalist was arrested while covering a protest against immigration detention, then was handed over to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) authorities for deportation. On April 3, Manuel Duran was outside the Shelby County jail in Memphis, reporting on the protest for the Spanish-language news site he runs, Memphis Noticias. Fifteen minutes into his livestream, police told him, "Get out of the street." Duran asked where to go, but before he could comply, one officer ordered other riot police, "Get him, guys." As the police dragged him away, two protesters latched on to Duran in a protective embrace, shouting, "He's a journalist!" Duran was charged with blocking a roadway and disorderly conduct, charges that were promptly dropped. Rather than releasing him, on April 5 the Shelby sheriff handed him over to ICE. He was transported six hours south to the LaSalle ...
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Twenty-Five Years After the Lucasville Uprising, Its Survivors Are Leading a New Prison Resistance Movement 26.4.2018 Truthout.com
This month marks the 25th anniversary of the Lucasville Uprising, the longest prison revolt involving fatalities to occur in the history of the United States. Survivors of this 11-day prison takeover are still fighting for basic human rights behind bars -- and still meeting state repression, now that prison strikes are regularly coordinated beyond any individual prison's walls. Police officers patrol the outer perimeter of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility April 12, 1993, after a prisoner uprising on April 11, 1993. (Photo: Eugene Garcia / AFP / Getty Images) This month marks the 25th anniversary of the Lucasville Uprising, the longest prison revolt involving fatalities to occur in the history of the United States. Survivors of this 11-day prisoner takeover of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility (SOCF) have been active and inspiring participants in the present movement for prisoners' rights, gaining attention that was unavailable to them in 1993. In light of the growing momentum in prisoner ...
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How the CIA's Secret Torture Program Sparked a Citizen-Led Public Reckoning in North Carolina 17.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout will never hide stories like this behind a paywall or subscription fee. Help us continue publishing free and uncensored news by making a donation today! President Donald Trump's nominee for CIA director, Gina Haspel, is  reported to have overseen  a US site in Thailand where torture of a suspected terrorist took place. Later she allegedly helped destroy evidence of torture. Her nomination, pending congressional approval, is viewed by many as further evidence of this administration's  support of torture  and an undoing of Obama-era efforts to end it. Her work was allegedly part of a program the CIA launched after 9/11 called  Rendition, Detention and Interrogation . From 2002 to at least 2006, the CIA orchestrated disappearances, torture and indefinite detention without charge of suspected terrorists. What can a small group of committed citizens who oppose these practices do to push back? A commission against torture in North Carolina may serve as a model for how citizen-led initiatives can ...
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Sentenced to 65 Years for a Cop's Crime 13.4.2018 Truthout.com
A'Donte Washington was 16 years old when an unnamed police officer shot him four times, killing him. A grand jury found the killing "justified," and the officer suffered no consequences. But there is someone who will be spending decades in prison for Washington's murder: his friend Lakeith Smith. This month, Smith was sentenced to 65 years in prison -- 30 years for a felony murder, 15 for burglary and two 10-year sentences for theft. Washington was killed while he and a group of friends were breaking into a house in February 2015. Officials claim Washington pulled a gun on the officer and fired, prompting the officer to shoot. No one denies that it was the police officer, not Lakeith Smith, who killed Washington. But Smith -- who was just 15 at the time of his friend's death -- was tried as an adult and convicted of felony murder after he rejected a plea deal in March that would have sent him to prison for "just" 25 years. The harsh sentence is a result of  Alabama's "accomplice liability" law , which ...
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How Do You Tell the Kids that Grandma Is in Jail for Resisting Nuclear Weapons? 8.4.2018 Truthout.com
"Our grandma is in jail," Madeline tells a woman wrestling a shopping cart at Target. "She went over a war fence and tried to make peace," Seamus adds helpfully. "They arrested her, and she is in jail now." "Where?" the woman asks, looking from them to me in disbelief and maybe pity. "We don't remember," the kids say, suddenly done with their story and ready to make passionate pleas for the colorful items in the dollar section over the woman's shoulder. "Georgia," I say, but I don't have a lot of energy to add detail to my kids' story. They hit all the high points. "There's a lot going on these days," she says. I agree, and we move on into the store and our separate errands. I was happy not to say more at that moment, happy to avoid a sobbing breakdown at Target, happy to wrestle one little bit of normal out of a very abnormal day. My mom, Liz McAlister, who turned 78 in November, had been arrested deep inside the King's Bay Naval Base in St. Mary's, Georgia in the early hours of Wednesday morning. Along ...
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From Stephon Clark to Voter Suppression, the Attack on Black America Intensifies 6.4.2018 Truthout.com
Black Lives Matter protesters march through the streets in response to the police shooting of Stephon Clark in Sacramento, California on March 28, 2018. (Photo: Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images) Republicans have enacted voter ID laws, purged voter rolls, shut polling places and enthusiastically embraced mass incarceration of Black people under different pretexts to deny them voting rights. Both Republicans and Democrats have maintained open season on Black bodies for law enforcement. The message couldn't be clearer: In this country, Black citizenship and Black lives have never mattered. Black Lives Matter protesters march through the streets in response to the police shooting of Stephon Clark in Sacramento, California on March 28, 2018. (Photo: Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images) It's hard to watch. Guns aimed at the dark. Loud yells. Loud salvo. Night drizzle in the tactical lights. Cops mistook his cell phone for a gun. I know already, he's dead. I finished watching the video of Stephon Clark's murder. ...
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ICE Will No Longer Release Pregnant Immigrants From Detention 5.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Once again President Donald Trump has taken a swing at undocumented immigrants living in the United States. This time he announced that Immigration and Customs Enforcement will no longer automatically release detained pregnant women. The new policy for automatic deportation or indefinite detention would reverse previous guidelines to release pregnant people unless they pose a security threat. Huffington Post  reports: Philip Miller, deputy executive associate director for ICE's Enforcement and Removal Operations, told reporters on Thursday that many pregnant women encountered by immigration enforcement are already subject to mandatory detention by law, particularly if they were apprehended at the border and are not deemed eligible to move forward with any claims for relief. Others may be subject to mandatory detention because they committed certain crimes within the US Since the policy went into effect in December, ICE has detained a total of 506 pregnant women, according to ICE, though the agency did ...
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Imprisoned for Offering Oral Sex: Ill-Founded Laws Criminalize People With HIV 31.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Laws remain on the books in more than 30 states making the possible transmission of HIV a criminal act. (Photo: scottmontreal / Flickr ) Despite enormous scientific and medical advances in the treatment of HIV, stigma around the virus continues to persist. Discrimination against those living with HIV remains pervasive in employment, housing and medical care. And in over 30 states, people with HIV are criminalized to the extent that even the possibility of HIV transmission is punishable by fines and incarceration. Laws remain on the books in more than 30 states making the possible transmission of HIV a criminal act. (Photo: scottmontreal / Flickr ) Support from readers provides Truthout with vital funds to keep investigating what mainstream media won't cover. Fund more stories like this by donating now! Eighteen months ago, in September 2017, the  Centers for Disease Control (CDC) finally recognized reality , posting on their website that "suppressing HIV through antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevents ...
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'We need to start pushing back': Chelsea Manning on war, freedom and her political plans 29.3.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics Almost one year has passed since Chelsea Manning was released from the U.S Army prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Manning, the most famous Army whistleblower, served seven years of a 35-year sentence for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified records about the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The day after receiving that sentence in 2014, she released a statement that read in part: "As I transition into this next phase of my life, I want everyone to know the real me. I am Chelsea Manning. I am a female." President Barack Obama commuted her sentence before he left office, and she has not wasted any time, announcing a run for the U.S. Senate seat in Maryland. Appearing on the Democracy Now! news hour, she talked about her newfound freedom: "It's overwhelming. I wake up some days, and I'm not sure that this is actually happening. I'm seeing more and more of the world and how it's become the world I feared a decade ago." A decade ago she was known as Pvt. Bradley Manning, working as ...
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Trump Is Running a War Crime Recycling Program 29.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
US soldiers walk to a rally point to link up with members of the Iraqi army for an operation in Al Muradia village, Iraq, March 12, 2007. (Photo: The US Army ) Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! A barely noticed anniversary slid by on March 20th. It's been 15 years since the United States committed the greatest war crime of the twenty-first century: the unprovoked, aggressive invasion of Iraq. The New York Times, which didn't exactly  cover itself in glory  in the run-up to that invasion, recently  ran  an op-ed by an Iraqi novelist living in the United States entitled "Fifteen Years Ago, America Destroyed My Country," but that was about it. The Washington Post, another publication that (despite the recent portrayal of its Vietnam-era heroism in the movie The Post)  repeatedly   editorialized  in favor of the invasion,  marked  the anniversary with a story about ...
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