User: flenvcenter Topic: Human Rights and Indigenous Rights-Independent
Category: Youth and Children
Last updated: Feb 24 2018 06:07 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Gatherings across the country call for Justice for Tina Fontaine 24.2.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson #JusticeForTinaFontaine gatherings are taking place today in Ottawa , Toronto and Halifax , on February 24 in Victoria , Vancouver , Montreal , Oriliia and Regina , and on February 25 in Guelph , Calgary and London . There is also an ongoing presence of people camped outside the Manitoba Legislature in Winnipeg. Late yesterday, a jury in Winnipeg found 56-year-old Raymond Cormier not guilty of the murder of the 15-year-old girl. The Globe and Mail reports: "The Winnipeg court heard from Thelma Favel that Tina left Sagkeeng, 115 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg, on June 30, 2014, to spend a week with her mother. It was her reward for an exceptional report card from École Powerview, her new, off-reserve school, where she had just finished Grade 9. Ms. Favel had been caring for Tina and her sister Sarah, one year her junior, since they were 3 and 4 in her home in Powerview-Pine Falls, just beyond Sagkeeng's northeast border." APTN adds: "The court heard Tina had a happy childhood raised by a ...
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Chicago's Youth Push Back Against Mayor's Proposed "Cop Academy"; Demand More Investment in Communities 22.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (C) and Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson (R) attend a police academy graduation and promotion ceremony in the Grand Ballroom at Navy Pier on June 15, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Scott Olson / Getty Images) Mayor Rahm Emanuel has manipulated a Department of Justice finding that Chicago Police routinely used excessive force on Black and Latinx people, into a proposal for a police training facility in a perennially disinvested and majority Black neighborhood. But a Black youth-led campaign is pushing back, demanding more investment in schools and communities instead. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (C) and Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson (R) attend a police academy graduation and promotion ceremony in the Grand Ballroom at Navy Pier on June 15, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Scott Olson / Getty Images) Grassroots, not-for-profit news is rare -- and Truthout's very existence depends on donations from readers. Will you help us publish more stories like this one? Make a ...
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Robert Reich: Morality and the Common Good Must Be at Center of Fighting Trump's Economic Agenda 20.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump made a promise to the American people: There would be no cuts to Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. Well, the promise has not been kept. Under his new budget, President Trump proposes a massive increase in Pentagon spending while cutting funding for Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. Trump's budget would also slash or completely eliminate core anti-poverty programs that form the heart of the US social safety net, from childhood nutrition to care for the elderly and job training. This comes after President Trump and Republican lawmakers pushed through a $1.5 trillion tax cut that overwhelmingly favors the richest Americans, including President Trump and his own family. We speak to Robert Reich, who served as labor secretary under President Bill Clinton. He is now a professor at the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book, out today, is titled The Common Good. TRANSCRIPT JUAN GONZÁLEZ: As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump made a ...
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Reclaiming the Radical Critique of Education 10.2.2018 Truthout.com
Whether you read Truthout daily, weekly or even once a month, now's the perfect time to show that you value real journalism. Make a donation to Truthout by clicking here! The left has a long history of critiquing not just the content of schooling, but the very concepts and institutions foundational to formal education. Sometimes incompatible but sometimes complementary, radical arguments have marched along side by side over the centuries. Some claimed that the working classes deserved open access to elite education, others that what schools taught was actually nothing more than indoctrination in service to elites and that schools needed a total overhaul in content, while yet others argued that the concepts of school and teacher were in themselves tools for indoctrination and disempowerment and should be abolished. Sometimes one person would adopt more than one, even all, of the above views, depending on the situation or moment. Sometimes radicals just argued the principles among themselves. But there ...
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Four Ways Trump and GOP Have Launched an All-Out Assault on the US's Poorest 4.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
President Donald J. Trump arrives for the State of the Union address in the chamber of the US House of Representatives, January 30, 2018, in Washington, DC. (Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images) The stories at Truthout equip ordinary people with the facts and resources to create extraordinary change. Support this vital work by making a tax-deductible donation now! During the first year of the Trump administration, the word "unprecedented" has been used so many times it has almost lost its meaning. But there simply is no other word to describe this presidency. First and foremost, there is the unprecedented degree to which the administration has attacked the country's institutions in ways that threaten the foundations of our democracy. But this first year is also unique because of the unforgiving extent to which the Trump administration and the Republican-controlled Congress have leveled legislative assaults against poor people.  1. Attempts to Repeal the Affordable Care Act Perhaps no issue is more ...
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Maharashtra to set up transgender welfare board soon 4.2.2018 Mumbai – The Indian Express
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For Homeless Youth, Statistics and Reality Are Miles Apart 28.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
This article was originally published by TalkPoverty.org. At the headquarters of Covenant House Washington in Southeast DC, a nonprofit serving youth experiencing homelessness, ten twin-sized black canvas cots fill a white-tiled alcove on the main floor. The space serves as an emergency shelter for homeless young people, which Covenant House calls "The Sanctuary." In keeping with its name, the walls are a deep, soothing blue. Five of the cots are for women and five for men, which is far short of the demand. The room is empty now, in mid-afternoon, but by 6:00 p.m., when the shelter opens, young people will be lining up for a chance to snag a few square feet of space for the evening, and maybe a shower and a hot meal. "We turn away at least 8 youth per night," says Madye Henson, Covenant House Washington's chief executive officer. Henson has added extra beds for hypothermia season and is planning a permanent expansion to 20 beds this year. In combination with its other programs, that would bring Covenant ...
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Idaho protects the rights of faith healers. Should it? 9.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
A debate rages over the extent of religious freedom in the face of preventable deaths.
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Overweight Children More Likely to Underestimate Their Size 5.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Overweight children are less accurate in estimating their own body size. And the bigger their body is, the more inaccurate their guesses.
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Aid group projects 48,000 births in crowded Rohingya camps 5.1.2018 World – The Indian Express
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How One Mississippi Teen Went 1,266 Days Behind Bars Before Receiving a Mental Evaluation 1.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Michael Gaida ) On Nov. 17, 2012, Tyler Haire was arrested in Vardaman, Mississippi, for attacking his father's girlfriend with a knife. Tyler, 16, had called 911 himself, and when they arrived, the local police found him seated quietly on a tree stump outside the home on County Road 433. The boy alternately said he could remember nothing and that they had the wrong man. Tyler was taken to the county jail in Pittsboro, 12 miles away, where the sheriff, worried that the awkward and overweight boy might hurt himself or be targeted by other inmates, placed him in a cell used for solitary confinement. Tyler had turned 17 by the time, five months later, a grand jury indicted him for aggravated assault, and his case went before a judge. Tyler's defense lawyer, appointed by the court, informed the judge in a court filing that his attempts at speaking with the boy had made it apparent the 17-year-old did not have "sufficient mental capacity" to understand the charge he was facing. The lawyer wanted Tyler ...
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Severe Complications for Women During Childbirth Are Skyrocketing -- and Could Often Be Prevented 27.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
More than 135 expectant and new mothers a day endure dangerous and even life-threatening complications that often leave them wounded, weakened, traumatized, financially devastated, unable to bear more children or searching in vain for answers about what went wrong. (Photo: Thomas Barwick / Getty Images) Leah Bahrencu's kidneys and liver shut down. Samantha Blackwell spent a month in a coma. Cindel Pena suffered heart failure. Heather Lavender lost her uterus. Rebecca Derohanian bled into her brain. Every year in the US, nearly 4 million women give birth, the vast majority without anything going amiss for themselves or their babies. But more than 135 expectant and new mothers a day -- or more than  50,000  a year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- endure dangerous and even life-threatening complications that often leave them wounded, weakened, traumatized, financially devastated, unable to bear more children or searching in vain for answers about what went wrong. For the past ...
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UK Is on Course for the Longest Fall in Living Standards Since Records Began 23.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
It felt like a long time to go when, in 2012, then-Chancellor George Osborne meekly warned that the economy was "healing" more slowly than anticipated and that austerity may last until 2018. Now 2018 is around the corner and instead of Britain seeing light at the end of the long and painful austerity tunnel, it's clear following the Conservative government's Autumn Budget that the age of austerity is far from over -- and that the inequality gap in the world's sixth richest country is widening. Far from achieving Prime Minister Theresa May's promises to tackle Britain's "burning injustices", several key members of her Social Mobility Commission (SMC) recently resigned in protest over the lack of progress towards "making Britain fairer". Alan Milburn, a Labour politician and chair of the SMC, which monitors the progress of improving social mobility in the UK,  quit the Commission  earlier this month along with his whole team, citing months of "indecision, dysfunctionality and lack of leadership" and ...
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Canada's explosive Christmas gift to the world 21.12.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada A few days before Christmas in 1988, I was dressed as Kris Kringle, sitting in the back of a police squad car, my hands tightly cuffed behind my back, my glasses fogged up, and my beard itching like crazy. Outside, I could hear people asking over and over again: why have they arrested Santa Claus? A few moments earlier, I had been inside a major Toronto toy store resisting the militarization of children, along with five other Santas and two elves, all of whom would also be arrested in a major police takedown that made the holiday-adorned shopping centre look more like a scene out of CSI. We were removing war toys from the store's shelves and placing them in garbage bags. Toy machine guns, missiles, grenades, sniper rifles, and tanks were among the various "fun" things being promoted as the perfect gift during the season of peace and good will to all. The criminalization of Santa came in response to our concerns that war and militarism were being promoted as an inevitable but ...
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Fascism's Return and Trump's War on Youth 16.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Students from numerous area high schools come together in Mariachi Plaza before continuing their march to City Hall to protest the upset election of Republican Donald Trump on November 14, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo: David McNew / Getty Images) We need your help to stay hot on the trail of injustice and corruption. It only takes a moment -- click here to support independent reporting! Fascism is all too often relegated to the history books. The word conjures up a period in which civilized societies treated democracy with contempt, engaged in acts of systemic violence, practised extermination and elimination, supported an "apocalyptic populism," suppressed dissent, promoted a hyper-nationalism, displayed contempt for women, embraced militarism as an absolute ideal and insisted on obedience to a self-proclaimed prophet. But the seeds that produced such fascist horrors have once again sprung to life, returning in new social and political forms. Today, a culture of fear dominates American ...
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Farmers’ children could establish agriculture based industries: CM 16.12.2017 Central Chronicle » Bhopal
Chief Minister Gives Sanction Letters of Bhavantar Amount to 13,281 Farmers Chronicle Reporter, Bhopal Chief... more »
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Food stamp benefits disrupted for thousands as state launches new eligibility system 16.12.2017 Chicago Tribune: Business
Tens of thousands of Illinois households aren’t receiving federal food stamp benefits leading up to the holidays because of problems with a state computer system. In 2013, the state’s Department of Human Services began rolling out a new computer system to administer entitlement benefits, such ...
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For the Cost of the Tax Bill, the US Could Eliminate Child Poverty Twice 14.12.2017 Truthout.com
You'll never see a paywall at Truthout and we'll never artificially restrict your access to the news. Can you pitch in to help keep it that way? We rely on our readers to keep us online, so make a one-time or monthly donation today! This article was originally published at TalkPoverty.org .  Congressional Republicans are rushing to finalize their tax legislation before the holidays. They haven't held a single hearing, in part because their plan is one of the  least popular  pieces of legislation ever. It's easy to see why: The Senate version of the bill would raise taxes on most families making  $75,000 or less  per year by 2027, while tying a big bow on permanent tax cuts for millionaires and large corporations. And after  years of panicking  over the size of the deficit, Republican leaders are now planning to balloon it by a whopping  $1.5 trillion  over the coming decade. That tells you a lot about Congress' priorities -- especially since, for less than the cost of the Republican tax plan, Congress ...
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Henry A. Giroux on Developing a Language of Liberation for Radical Transformation 10.12.2017 Truthout.com
At the moment, people in the US are enduring a numbing assault from an authoritarianism brought to full fruition under Donald Trump. However, a galvanizing hope can shape a new vision and activism that will be transformative in the battle against an oppressive capitalism, says author and scholar Henry A. Giroux, who talked to Truthout about his new book, The Public in Peril. Hundreds of University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee students protest a Trump campaign rally on their campus, January 1, 2014. Protests by young people could become illegal in the future, according to Henry A. Giroux. (Image: Joe Brusky / Flickr ) What are the longer-term trends that gave rise to the presidency of Donald Trump? What will be the national and global impacts? And what do we need to do to resist? Henry A. Giroux tackles these questions in The Public in Peril: Trump and the Menace of American Authoritarianism. "This courageous and timely book is the first and best book on Trump's neo-fascism in the making," says Cornel West. ...
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Keeping US Education Segregated Is a Highly Profitable Business for Some 3.12.2017 Truthout.com
The US has a long history of educating economically vulnerable children in completely different ways than children who are wealthy, says Noliwe Rooks, author of Cutting School. The racial and economic segregation of schools is actually a lucrative business for companies that create these separate and unequal educational experiments with taxpayer funds and very little oversight, she explains. Protesters demonstrate as Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum on "A Conversation On Empowering Parents" on September 28, 2017, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. DeVos was met by protesters both outside the venue and inside during her remarks. (Photo: Paul Marotta / Getty Images) Why are schools in the United States more segregated than they have been since the mid-20th century? In Cutting School, a book that Naomi Klein calls "astounding" and Bill Ayers calls "smart" and "wise," Noliwe Rooks delivers a timely indictment of the corporate takeover and dismantling of ...
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